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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:达特福德 大小:tn2328Ck64249KB 下载:OVebbgm038219次
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日期:2020-08-08 20:14:47
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Telemachus saw Eumaeus long before any one else did, and beckonedhim to come and sit beside him; so he looked about and saw a seatlying near where the carver sat serving out their portions to thesuitors; he picked it up, brought it to Telemachus's table, and satdown opposite him. Then the servant brought him his portion, andgave him bread from the bread-basket.
2.  When Laodamas heard this he made his way into the middle of thecrowd and said to Ulysses, "I hope, Sir, that you will enteryourself for some one or other of our competitions if you areskilled in any of them- and you must have gone in for many a onebefore now. There is nothing that does any one so much credit allhis life long as the showing himself a proper man with his hands andfeet. Have a try therefore at something, and banish all sorrow fromyour mind. Your return home will not be long delayed, for the shipis already drawn into the water, and the crew is found."
3.  MINERVA now put it in Penelope's mind to make the suitors trytheir skill with the bow and with the iron axes, in contest amongthemselves, as a means of bringing about their destruction. She wentupstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze andhad a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the storeroom at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold,bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, andthe quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friendwhom he had met in Lacedaemon- Iphitus the son of Eurytus. The twofell in with one another in Messene at the house of Ortilochus,where Ulysses was staying in order to recover a debt that was owingfrom the whole people; for the Messenians had carried off threehundred sheep from Ithaca, and had sailed away with them and withtheir shepherds. In quest of these Ulysses took a long journey whilestill quite young, for his father and the other chieftains sent him ona mission to recover them. Iphitus had gone there also to try andget back twelve brood mares that he had lost, and the mule foalsthat were running with them. These mares were the death of him inthe end, for when he went to the house of Jove's son, mighty Hercules,who performed such prodigies of valour, Hercules to his shame killedhim, though he was his guest, for he feared not heaven's vengeance,nor yet respected his own table which he had set before Iphitus, butkilled him in spite of everything, and kept the mares himself. Itwas when claiming these that Iphitus met Ulysses, and gave him the bowwhich mighty Eurytus had been used to carry, and which on his deathhad been left by him to his son. Ulysses gave him in return a swordand a spear, and this was the beginning of a fast friendship, althoughthey never visited at one another's houses, for Jove's son Herculeskilled Iphitus ere they could do so. This bow, then, given him byIphitus, had not been taken with him by Ulysses when he sailed forTroy; he had used it so long as he had been at home, but had left itbehind as having been a keepsake from a valued friend.
4.  Irus began to be very uneasy as he heard them, but the servantsgirded him by force, and brought him [into the open part of the court]in such a fright that his limbs were all of a tremble. Antinousscolded him and said, "You swaggering bully, you ought never to havebeen born at all if you are afraid of such an old broken-down creatureas this tramp is. I say, therefore- and it shall surely be- if hebeats you and proves himself the better man, I shall pack you off onboard ship to the mainland and send you to king Echetus, who killsevery one that comes near him. He will cut off your nose and ears, anddraw out your entrails for the dogs to eat."
5.  "My dear," answered Penelope, "I have no wish to set myself up,nor to depreciate you; but I am not struck by your appearance, for Ivery well remember what kind of a man you were when you set sailfrom Ithaca. Nevertheless, Euryclea, take his bed outside the bedchamber that he himself built. Bring the bed outside this room, andput bedding upon it with fleeces, good coverlets, and blankets."
6.  She did not say a word about her own wedding, for she did not liketo, but her father knew and said, "You shall have the mules, mylove, and whatever else you have a mind for. Be off with you, andthe men shall get you a good strong waggon with a body to it that willhold all your clothes."

计划指导

1.  "But there! It rests with heaven to determine whether he is toreturn, and take his revenge in his own house or no; I would, however,urge you to set about trying to get rid of these suitors at once. Takemy advice, call the Achaean heroes in assembly to-morrow -lay yourcase before them, and call heaven to bear you witness. Bid the suitorstake themselves off, each to his own place, and if your mother'smind is set on marrying again, let her go back to her father, who willfind her a husband and provide her with all the marriage gifts that sodear a daughter may expect. As for yourself, let me prevail upon youto take the best ship you can get, with a crew of twenty men, and goin quest of your father who has so long been missing. Some one maytell you something, or (and people often hear things in this way) someheaven-sent message may direct you. First go to Pylos and askNestor; thence go on to Sparta and visit Menelaus, for he got homelast of all the Achaeans; if you hear that your father is alive and onhis way home, you can put up with the waste these suitors will makefor yet another twelve months. If on the other hand you hear of hisdeath, come home at once, celebrate his funeral rites with all duepomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make your mother marryagain. Then, having done all this, think it well over in your mindhow, by fair means or foul, you may kill these suitors in your ownhouse. You are too old to plead infancy any longer; have you not heardhow people are singing Orestes' praises for having killed his father'smurderer Aegisthus? You are a fine, smart looking fellow; show yourmettle, then, and make yourself a name in story. Now, however, Imust go back to my ship and to my crew, who will be impatient if Ikeep them waiting longer; think the matter over for yourself, andremember what I have said to you."
2.  "I spoke as movingly as I could, but they said nothing, till theirfather answered, 'Vilest of mankind, get you gone at once out of theisland; him whom heaven hates will I in no wise help. Be off, foryou come here as one abhorred of heaven. "And with these words he sentme sorrowing from his door.
3.  "Having so said she dived under the waves, whereon I turned backto the place where my ships were ranged upon the shore; and my heartwas clouded with care as I went along. When I reached my ship we gotsupper ready, for night was falling, and camped down upon the beach.
4.  Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."
5.  "Alas," he exclaimed, "among what manner of people am I fallen?Are they savage and uncivilized or hospitable and humane? Whereshall I put all this treasure, and which way shall I go? I wish Ihad stayed over there with the Phaeacians; or I could have gone tosome other great chief who would have been good to me and given mean escort. As it is I do not know where to put my treasure, and Icannot leave it here for fear somebody else should get hold of it.In good truth the chiefs and rulers of the Phaeacians have not beendealing fairly by me, and have left me in the wrong country; they saidthey would take me back to Ithaca and they have not done so: mayJove the protector of suppliants chastise them, for he watches overeverybody and punishes those who do wrong. Still, I suppose I mustcount my goods and see if the crew have gone off with any of them."
6.  "Thus she both was, and still is, respected beyond measure by herchildren, by Alcinous himself, and by the whole people, who lookupon her as a goddess, and greet her whenever she goes about the city,for she is a thoroughly good woman both in head and heart, and whenany women are friends of hers, she will help their husbands also tosettle their disputes. If you can gain her good will, you may haveevery hope of seeing your friends again, and getting safely back toyour home and country."

推荐功能

1.  "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"
2.  "There it was that I heard news of Ulysses, for the king told mehe had entertained him, and shown him much hospitality while he was onhis homeward journey. He showed me also the treasure of gold, andwrought iron that Ulysses had got together. There was enough to keephis family for ten generations, so much had he left in the house ofking Pheidon. But the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the god's high oak tree, and know whetherafter so long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly, or insecret. Moreover the king swore in my presence, making drink-offeringsin his own house as he did so, that the ship was by the water side,and the crew found, that should take him to his own country. He sentme off however before Ulysses returned, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,and he told those in charge of her to be sure and take me safely toKing Acastus.
3.  "And I saw Tityus son of Gaia stretched upon the plain andcovering some nine acres of ground. Two vultures on either side of himwere digging their beaks into his liver, and he kept on trying to beatthem off with his hands, but could not; for he had violated Jove'smistress Leto as she was going through Panopeus on her way to Pytho.
4.  "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?
5.   "My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."
6.  "They all swore as she told them, and when they had completedtheir oath the woman said, 'Hush; and if any of your men meets me inthe street or at the well, do not let him speak to me, for fear someone should go and tell my master, in which case he would suspectsomething. He would put me in prison, and would have all of youmurdered; keep your own counsel therefore; buy your merchandise asfast as you can, and send me word when you have done loading. I willbring as much gold as I can lay my hands on, and there is somethingelse also that I can do towards paying my fare. I am nurse to theson of the good man of the house, a funny little fellow just able torun about. I will carry him off in your ship, and you will get a greatdeal of money for him if you take him and sell him in foreign parts.'

应用

1.  Calypso knew him at once- for the gods all know each other, nomatter how far they live from one another- but Ulysses was not within;he was on the sea-shore as usual, looking out upon the barren oceanwith tears in his eyes, groaning and breaking his heart for sorrow.Calypso gave Mercury a seat and said: "Why have you come to see me,Mercury- honoured, and ever welcome- for you do not visit me often?Say what you want; I will do it for be you at once if I can, and if itcan be done at all; but come inside, and let me set refreshment beforeyou.
2.  Then Telemachus went out of the court to the place where theAchaeans were meeting in assembly; he had his spear in his hand, andhe was not alone, for his two dogs went with him. But Eurycleacalled the maids and said, "Come, wake up; set about sweeping thecloisters and sprinkling them with water to lay the dust; put thecovers on the seats; wipe down the tables, some of you, with a wetsponge; clean out the mixing-jugs and the cups, and for water from thefountain at once; the suitors will be here directly; they will be hereearly, for it is a feast day."
3.  "Menelaus," replied Telemachus, "I want to go home at once, for whenI came away I left my property without protection, and fear that whilelooking for my father I shall come to ruin myself, or find thatsomething valuable has been stolen during my absence."
4、  While he was thus in two minds a wave caught him and took him withsuch force against the rocks that he would have been smashed andtorn to pieces if Minerva had not shown him what to do. He caught holdof the rock with both hands and clung to it groaning with pain tillthe wave retired, so he was saved that time; but presently the wavecame on again and carried him back with it far into the sea-tearinghis hands as the suckers of a polypus are torn when some one plucks itfrom its bed, and the stones come up along with it even so did therocks tear the skin from his strong hands, and then the wave drewhim deep down under the water.
5、  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, the sons ofAutolycus went out with their hounds hunting, and Ulysses went too.They climbed the wooded slopes of Parnassus and soon reached itsbreezy upland valleys; but as the sun was beginning to beat upon thefields, fresh-risen from the slow still currents of Oceanus, they cameto a mountain dell. The dogs were in front searching for the tracks ofthe beast they were chasing, and after them came the sons ofAutolycus, among whom was Ulysses, close behind the dogs, and he had along spear in his hand. Here was the lair of a huge boar among somethick brushwood, so dense that the wind and rain could not get throughit, nor could the sun's rays pierce it, and the ground underneathlay thick with fallen leaves. The boar heard the noise of the men'sfeet, and the hounds baying on every side as the huntsmen came up tohim, so rushed from his lair, raised the bristles on his neck, andstood at bay with fire flashing from his eyes. Ulysses was the firstto raise his spear and try to drive it into the brute, but the boarwas too quick for him, and charged him sideways, ripping him above theknee with a gash that tore deep though it did not reach the bone. Asfor the boar, Ulysses hit him on the right shoulder, and the pointof the spear went right through him, so that he fell groaning in thedust until the life went out of him. The sons of Autolycus busiedthemselves with the carcass of the boar, and bound Ulysses' wound;then, after saying a spell to stop the bleeding, they went home asfast as they could. But when Autolycus and his sons had thoroughlyhealed Ulysses, they made him some splendid presents, and sent himback to Ithaca with much mutual good will. When he got back, hisfather and mother were rejoiced to see him, and asked him all aboutit, and how he had hurt himself to get the scar; so he told them howthe boar had ripped him when he was out hunting with Autolycus and hissons on Mount Parnassus.

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  • 弗朗西斯·奥 08-07

      "Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try tothrow the blame upon us suitors? It is your mother's fault not ours,for she is a very artful woman. This three years past, and close onfour, she has been driving us out of our minds, by encouraging eachone of us, and sending him messages without meaning one word of whatshe says. And then there was that other trick she played us. She setup a great tambour frame in her room, and began to work on an enormouspiece of fine needlework. 'Sweet hearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeeddead, still do not press me to marry again immediately, wait- for Iwould not have skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havecompleted a pall for the hero Laertes, to be in readiness againstthe time when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the womenof the place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.'

  • 林佑春 08-07

      Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. She took his shape,and went round the town to each one of the crew, telling them tomeet at the ship by sundown. She went also to Noemon son ofPhronius, and asked him to let her have a ship- which he was veryready to do. When the sun had set and darkness was over all theland, she got the ship into the water, put all the tackle on board herthat ships generally carry, and stationed her at the end of theharbour. Presently the crew came up, and the goddess spokeencouragingly to each of them.

  • 杰弗里·普尔 08-07

       "When at last we got to the island where we had left the rest of ourships, we found our comrades lamenting us, and anxiously awaitingour return. We ran our vessel upon the sands and got out of her onto the sea shore; we also landed the Cyclops' sheep, and dividedthem equitably amongst us so that none might have reason tocomplain. As for the ram, my companions agreed that I should have itas an extra share; so I sacrificed it on the sea shore, and burned itsthigh bones to Jove, who is the lord of all. But he heeded not mysacrifice, and only thought how he might destroy my ships and mycomrades.

  • 陈冬明 08-07

      "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."

  • 夏野萍 08-06

    {  On this he took his leave, and Calypso went out to look for Ulysses,for she had heard Jove's message. She found him sitting upon the beachwith his eyes ever filled with tears, and dying of sheerhome-sickness; for he had got tired of Calypso, and though he wasforced to sleep with her in the cave by night, it was she, not he,that would have it so. As for the day time, he spent it on the rocksand on the sea-shore, weeping, crying aloud for his despair, andalways looking out upon the sea. Calypso then went close up to himsaid:

  • 林森 08-05

      "I spoke comfortingly to them and said, 'We must draw our ship on tothe land, and hide the ship's gear with all our property in some cave;then come with me all of you as fast as you can to Circe's house,where you will find your comrades eating and drinking in the midstof great abundance.'}

  • 蔡国斌 08-05

      This was how they talked, but they knew nothing about it; andAlcinous said, "I remember now the old prophecy of my father. Hesaid that Neptune would be angry with us for taking every one sosafely over the sea, and would one day wreck a Phaeacian ship as itwas returning from an escort, and bury our city under a high mountain.This was what my old father used to say, and now it is all comingtrue. Now therefore let us all do as I say; in the first place we mustleave off giving people escorts when they come here, and in the nextlet us sacrifice twelve picked bulls to Neptune that he may have mercyupon us, and not bury our city under the high mountain." When thepeople heard this they were afraid and got ready the bulls.

  • 田开宝 08-05

      "Wife," said he, turning to Queen Arete, "Go, fetch the best chestwe have, and put a clean cloak and shirt in it. Also, set a copperon the fire and heat some water; our guest will take a warm bath;see also to the careful packing of the presents that the noblePhaeacians have made him; he will thus better enjoy both his supperand the singing that will follow. I shall myself give him thisgolden goblet- which is of exquisite workmanship- that he may bereminded of me for the rest of his life whenever he makes adrink-offering to Jove, or to any of the gods."

  • 俞俭 08-04

       As he was speaking a bird flew by upon his right hand- a hawk,Apollo's messenger. It held a dove in its talons, and the feathers, asit tore them off, fell to the ground midway between Telemachus and theship. On this Theoclymenus called him apart and caught him by thehand. "Telemachus," said he, "that bird did not fly on your right handwithout having been sent there by some god. As soon as I saw it I knewit was an omen; it means that you will remain powerful and thatthere will be no house in Ithaca more royal than your own."

  • 章伯钧 08-02

    {  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."

  • 陆辉任 08-02

      Calypso knew him at once- for the gods all know each other, nomatter how far they live from one another- but Ulysses was not within;he was on the sea-shore as usual, looking out upon the barren oceanwith tears in his eyes, groaning and breaking his heart for sorrow.Calypso gave Mercury a seat and said: "Why have you come to see me,Mercury- honoured, and ever welcome- for you do not visit me often?Say what you want; I will do it for be you at once if I can, and if itcan be done at all; but come inside, and let me set refreshment beforeyou.

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