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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:潘江东 大小:5FxQSoZh64268KB 下载:SBeVyE2g32397次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:u7NYi4lR79620条
日期:2020-08-05 22:20:12
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张东健

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter, and made a vision inthe likeness of Penelope's sister Iphthime daughter of Icarius who hadmarried Eumelus and lived in Pherae. She told the vision to go tothe house of Ulysses, and to make Penelope leave off crying, so itcame into her room by the hole through which the thong went forpulling the door to, and hovered over her head, saying,
2.  Meanwhile the bard began to sing the loves of Mars and Venus, andhow they first began their intrigue in the house of Vulcan. Marsmade Venus many presents, and defiled King Vulcan's marriage bed, sothe sun, who saw what they were about, told Vulcan. Vulcan was veryangry when he heard such dreadful news, so he went to his smithybrooding mischief, got his great anvil into its place, and began toforge some chains which none could either unloose or break, so thatthey might stay there in that place. When he had finished his snare hewent into his bedroom and festooned the bed-posts all over with chainslike cobwebs; he also let many hang down from the great beam of theceiling. Not even a god could see them, so fine and subtle werethey. As soon as he had spread the chains all over the bed, he made asthough he were setting out for the fair state of Lemnos, which ofall places in the world was the one he was most fond of. But Mars keptno blind look out, and as soon as he saw him start, hurried off to hishouse, burning with love for Venus.
3.  "Alas! I shall either be always feeble and of no prowess, or I amtoo young, and have not yet reached my full strength so as to beable to hold my own if any one attacks me. You others, therefore,who are stronger than I, make trial of the bow and get this contestsettled."
4.  "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."
5.  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"
6.  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:

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1.  "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."
2.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.
3.  "The men were in despair at this, and Eurylochus at once gave mean insolent answer. 'Ulysses,' said he, 'you are cruel; you are verystrong yourself and never get worn out; you seem to be made of iron,and now, though your men are exhausted with toil and want of sleep,you will not let them land and cook themselves a good supper upon thisisland, but bid them put out to sea and go faring fruitlessly onthrough the watches of the flying night. It is by night that the windsblow hardest and do so much damage; how can we escape should one ofthose sudden squalls spring up from South West or West, which so oftenwreck a vessel when our lords the gods are unpropitious? Now,therefore, let us obey the of night and prepare our supper here hardby the ship; to-morrow morning we will go on board again and put outto sea.'
4.  "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'
5.  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:
6.  "What do you mean, Telemachus," replied Antinous, "by thisswaggering talk? If all the suitors were to give him as much as Iwill, he would not come here again for another three months."

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1.  "May heaven," answered Ulysses, "requite to them the wickedness withwhich they deal high-handedly in another man's house without any senseof shame."
2.  She heeded her son's words, washed her face, changed her dress,and vowed full and sufficient hecatombs to all the gods if theywould only vouchsafe her revenge upon the suitors.
3.  Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land.
4.  Telemachus went through, and out of, the cloisters spear in hand-not alone, for his two fleet dogs went with him. Minerva endowed himwith a presence of such divine comeliness that all marvelled at him ashe went by, and the suitors gathered round him with fair words intheir mouths and malice in their hearts; but he avoided them, and wentto sit with Mentor, Antiphus, and Halitherses, old friends of hisfather's house, and they made him tell them all that had happened tohim. Then Piraeus came up with Theoclymenus, whom he had escortedthrough the town to the place of assembly, whereon Telemachus atonce joined them. Piraeus was first to speak: "Telemachus," said he,"I wish you would send some of your women to my house to take awathe presents Menelaus gave you."
5.   Thus did she talk with her maids as she sat in her own room, andin the meantime Ulysses was getting his dinner. Then she called forthe swineherd and said, "Eumaeus, go and tell the stranger to comehere, I want to see him and ask him some questions. He seems to havetravelled much, and he may have seen or heard something of myunhappy husband."
6.  Outside the gate of the outer court there is a large garden of aboutfour acres with a wall all round it. It is full of beautiful trees-pears, pomegranates, and the most delicious apples. There are lusciousfigs also, and olives in full growth. The fruits never rot nor failall the year round, neither winter nor summer, for the air is sosoft that a new crop ripens before the old has dropped. Pear growson pear, apple on apple, and fig on fig, and so also with thegrapes, for there is an excellent vineyard: on the level ground of apart of this, the grapes are being made into raisins; in anotherpart they are being gathered; some are being trodden in the wine tubs,others further on have shed their blossom and are beginning to showfruit, others again are just changing colour. In the furthest partof the ground there are beautifully arranged beds of flowers thatare in bloom all the year round. Two streams go through it, the oneturned in ducts throughout the whole garden, while the other iscarried under the ground of the outer court to the house itself, andthe town's people draw water from it. Such, then, were thesplendours with which the gods had endowed the house of king Alcinous.

应用

1.  Then Arete told her maids to set a large tripod upon the fire asfast as they could, whereon they set a tripod full of bath water on toa clear fire; they threw on sticks to make it blaze, and the waterbecame hot as the flame played about the belly of the tripod.Meanwhile Arete brought a magnificent chest her own room, and insideit she packed all the beautiful presents of gold and raiment which thePhaeacians had brought. Lastly she added a cloak and a good shirt fromAlcinous, and said to Ulysses:
2.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
3.  "All that you have said is true," answered Euryclea, "but let mebring you some clean clothes- a shirt and cloak. Do not keep theserags on your back any longer. It is not right."
4、  "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."
5、  Telemachus saw Eumaeus long before any one else did, and beckonedhim to come and sit beside him; so he looked about and saw a seatlying near where the carver sat serving out their portions to thesuitors; he picked it up, brought it to Telemachus's table, and satdown opposite him. Then the servant brought him his portion, andgave him bread from the bread-basket.

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  • 徐国栋 08-04

      "This dream, Madam," replied Ulysses, "can admit but of oneinterpretation, for had not Ulysses himself told you how it shall befulfilled? The death of the suitors is portended, and not one singleone of them will escape."

  • 邵辉 08-04

      A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewerand poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, andshe drew a clean table beside them. An upper servant brought thembread, and offered them many good things of what there was in thehouse, the carver fetched them plates of all manner of meats and setcups of gold by their side, and a man-servant brought them wine andpoured it out for them.

  • 孙思 08-04

       On this the maids left off running away and began calling oneanother back. They made Ulysses sit down in the shelter as Nausicaahad told them, and brought him a shirt and cloak. They also broughthim the little golden cruse of oil, and told him to go wash in thestream. But Ulysses said, "Young women, please to stand a little onone side that I may wash the brine from my shoulders and anoint myselfwith oil, for it is long enough since my skin has had a drop of oilupon it. I cannot wash as long as you all keep standing there. I amashamed to strip before a number of good-looking young women."

  • 聂咏梅 08-04

      This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."

  • 徐莹 08-03

    {  As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.

  • 段菁菁 08-02

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."}

  • 马长林 08-02

      At this moment the bow was in the hands of Eurymachus, who waswarming it by the fire, but even so he could not string it, and he wasgreatly grieved. He heaved a deep sigh and said, "I grieve formyself and for us all; I grieve that I shall have to forgo themarriage, but I do not care nearly so much about this, for there areplenty of other women in Ithaca and elsewhere; what I feel most is thefact of our being so inferior to Ulysses in strength that we cannotstring his bow. This will disgrace us in the eyes of those who are yetunborn."

  • 酒井省一 08-02

      "But why," said Ulysses, "did you not tell him, for you knew allabout it? Did you want him too to go sailing about amid all kinds ofhardship while others are eating up his estate?"

  • 廖鹏 08-01

       "King Alcinous, you said your people were the nimblest dancers inthe world, and indeed they have proved themselves to be so. I wasastonished as I saw them."

  • 比布拉德-皮特 07-30

    {  When she had thus spoken, she flew away in the form of an eagle, andall marvelled as they beheld it. Nestor was astonished, and tookTelemachus by the hand. "My friend," said he, "I see that you aregoing to be a great hero some day, since the gods wait upon you thuswhile you are still so young. This can have been none other of thosewho dwell in heaven than Jove's redoubtable daughter, theTrito-born, who showed such favour towards your brave father among theArgives." "Holy queen," he continued, "vouchsafe to send down thygrace upon myself, my good wife, and my children. In return, I willoffer you in sacrifice a broad-browed heifer of a year old,unbroken, and never yet brought by man under the yoke. I will gild herhorns, and will offer her up to you in sacrifice."

  • 江煜琼 07-30

      "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."

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