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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:萨尔瓦·基尔·马亚尔迪特 大小:IzrTJxvF25207KB 下载:jCfijQS293444次
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日期:2020-08-03 23:25:04
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Having thus spoken, he arose againe; granting leave to the rest,to recreate themselves till supper time. The Garden was very faire andspacious, affoording, large limits for their severall walkes; theSun being already so low descended, that it could not be offensiveto any one, the Connies, Kids, and young Hindes skipping every whereabout them, to their no meane, pleasure and contentment, Dioneus andFiammetta, sate singing together, of Messire Guiglielmo, and theLady of Vertur. Philomena and Pamphilus playing at the Chesse, allsporting themselves as best they pleased. But the houre of Supperbeing come, and the Tables covered about the faire fountaine, theysate downe and supt in most loving manner. Then Philostratus, not toswerve from the course which had beene observed by the Queenesbefore him, so soone as the Tables were taken away, gave commaund thatMadam Lauretta should beginne the dance, and likewise to sing aSong. My gracious Lord (quoth she) I can skill of no other Songs,but onely a peece of mine owne, which I have already learned by heart,and may well beseeme this assembly: if you please to allow of that,I am ready to performe it with all obedience. Lady, replyed theKing, you your selfe being so faire and lovely, so needs must bewhatsoever commeth from you, therefore let us heare such as youhave. Madam Lauretta, giving enstruction to the Chorus prepared, andbegan in this manner.
2.  Be of good cheere neighbour Calandrino, replyed Doctor Simon, I willprovide an excellent distilled drinke for you, marveilously pleasingin taste, and of soveraigne vertue, which will resolve all in threemornings, making you as whole and as sound as a Fish newly spawned.But you must have an especiall care afterward, being providently wise,least you fall into the like follies againe. Concerning thepreparation of this precious drinke, halfe a dozen of Capons, the veryfairest and fattest, I must make use of in the distillation: whatother things shall bee imployed beside, you may deliver forty Florinesto one of these your honest friends, to see all the necessaries boughtand sent me home to my house. Concerning my businesse, make you nodoubt thereof, for I will have all distilled against to morrow, andthen doe you drinke a great Glasse full every morning, fresh andfasting next your heart. Calandrino was highly pleased with his words,returning master Doctor infinite thankes, and referring all to hisdisposing. And having given forty Florines to Bruno, with othermoney beside, to buy the halfe dozen of Capons: he thought himselfegreatly beholding to them all, and protested to requite theirkindenesse.
3.  The Pope, who was of a magnanimious spirit, and one that highlyaffected men of vertue, hearing the commendable motion made by theAbbot; returned answere, that he was as willing to grant it, as theother desired it, sending Letters of safe conduct for his commingthither. Ghinotto receiving such assurance from the Court of Rome,came thither immediatly, to the great joy of the Lord Abbot: and thePope finding him to be a man of valor and worth, uponreconciliation, remitted all former errors, creating him knight, andLord Prior of the very chiefest Hospitall in Rome. In which Officehe lived long time after, as a loyall servant to the Church, and anhonest thankefull friend to the Lord Abbot of Clugny.
4.  Now began day-light to appeare, when he (having the rich Ring on hisfinger) wandred on hee knew not whether: till comming to the Sea side,he found the way directing to his Inne, where al his company were withhis Host, who had bene verie carefull for him.
5.  After that Madame Fiammetta had given over speaking, and all theAuditory had sufficiently applauded the Schollers honest revenge,the Queene enjoyned Philostratus, to proceede on next with his Novell,which caused him to begin thus. Beleeve me Ladies, it is anexcellent and most commendable thing, to speak well, and to allpurposes: but I hold it a matter of much greater worth, to know how todo it, and when necessity doth most require it. Which a Gentlewoman(of whom I am now to speake) was so well enstructed in, as not onelyit yeelded the hearers mirthfull contentment, but likewise deliveredher from the danger of death, as (in few words) you shal hearerelated.
6.  from his very youngest yeares, brought up to this instant in myCourt; wherein thou hast given me much affliction of minde, and sooverthrowne my senses, as I cannot well imagine how I should dealewith thee. For him, whom I have this night caused to be surprized,even as he came forth of your close contrived conveyance, anddetaine as my prisoner, I have resolved how to proceed with him: butconcerning thy selfe, mine oppressions are so many and violent, as Iknow not what to say of thee. e. way, thou hast meerly murthered theunfeigned affection I bare thee, as never any father could expressemore to his childe: and then againe, thou hast kindled a most justindignation in me, by thine immodest and wilfull folly, and whereasNature pleadeth pardon for the one, yet justice standeth up againstthe other, and urgeth cruell severity against thee: neverthelesse,before I will determine upon any resolution, I come purposely first toheare thee speake, and what thou canst say for thy selfe, in a badcase, so desperate and dangerous.

计划指导

1.  IMPORTUNATE SUITERS, BY SUBTILE AND INGENIOUS MEANES,
2.  My Lord Judge, you are welcome hither, and to answer you breefelyvery true it is, that I have a yong Gentlewoman in my house, whom Ineither know to be your wife, or any other mans else whatsoever: for Iam ignorant both of you and her, albeit she hath remained a while herewith me. If you be her husband, as you seeme to avouch, I will bringher to you, for you appeare to be a worthy Gentleman, and(questionlesse) she cannot chuse but know you perfectly. If she doconfirme that which you have saide, and be willing to depart hencewith you: I shal rest well satisfied, and will have no otherrecompence for her ransome (in regard of your grave and reverendyeeres) but what your selfe shall please to give me. But if it fallout other then you have affirmed, you shal offer me great wrong, inseeking to get her from me; because I am a young man, and can aswell maintaine so faire a wife as you, or any man else that I know.Beleeve it certainly, replyed the judge, that she is my wife, and ifyou please to bring me where she is, you shall soone perceive it:for she will presently cast her armes about my necke, and I durstadventure the utter losse of her, if she deny to do it in yourpresence. Come on then, saide Pagamino, and let us delay the time nolonger.
3.  Panuccio, yawning and stretching out his limbes, with unusuallgroanes and respirations, such as (better) could bee hardlydissembled: seemed to wake as out of a traunce, and calling his friendAdriano, said.
4.  In his riding towards France, as he passed by Naples, heeovertooke another yong Gentleman, a native of Antioch, and namedGiosefo, whose journey lay the same way as the others did. Havingridden in company some few dayes together, as it is a custome commonlyobserved among Travellers, to understand one anothers Countrey andcondition, as also to what part his occasions call him: so happened itwith them, Giosefo directly telling him, that he journyed, towards thewise King Salomon, to desire his advise what meanes he shouldobserve in the reclaiming of a wilfull wife, the most froward andselfe-willed woman that ever lived; whom neither faire perswasions,nor gentle courtesies could in any manner prevaile withall.Afterward he demaunded of Melisso, to know the occasion of histravell, and whither.
5.  With men it is not so, they are borne apt for a thousandoccasions, as well for the present purpose wee talke of, as infiniteother beside; yea, and many of them are more esteemed being aged, thenwhen they were young. But women serve onely for mens contentation, andto bring Children; and therefore are they generally beloved, whichif they faile of, either it is by unfortunate marriage, or someimperfection depending on nature, not through want of good will inthemselves. Wee have nothing in this World but what is given us, inwhich regard, wee are to make use of our time, and employ it thebetter while wee have it. For, when wee grow to bee old, our Husbands,yea, our very dearest and nearest Friends, will scarsely looke onus. Wee are then fit for nothing, but to sit by the fire in theKitchin, telling tales to the Cat, or counting the Pots and Panneson the shelves. Nay, which is worse, Rimes and Songs is made of us,even in meere contempt of our age, and commendation of such as areyoung, the daintiest morsels are fittest for them, and wee referred tofeed on the scrappes from their Trenchers, or such reversion as theycan spare us. I tell thee Daughter, thou couldst not make choyce ofa meeter woman in all the City, to whom thou mightest safely openthy minde, and knowes better to advise thee then I doe. But rememberwithall, that I am poore, and it is your part not to suffer poverty tobee unsupplyed. I will make thee partaker of all these blessedpardons, at every Altar I will say a Pater Noster, and an Ave Maria,that thou maist prosper in thy hearts desires, and be defended fromfoule sinne and shame, and so she ended her Motherly counsell.
6.  Lords, Ladies, and you the rest of my worthy Auditors: You are tounderstand, that I (being then very young) was sent by my Superiour,into those parts, where the Sun appeareth at his first rising. And Ihad received charge by expresse command, that I should seeke for (somuch as consisted in my power to do) the especiall vertues andpriviledges belonging to Porcellane, which although the boylingthereof bee worth but little, yet it is very profitable to any but us.In regard whereof, being upon my journey, and departing from Venice,passing along the Borgo de Grecia, I proceeded thence (on horseback)through the Realme of Garbo, so to Baldacca, till I came to Parione;from whence, not without great extremity of thirst, I arrived inSardignia.

推荐功能

1.  Justly deserve by death to be controld.
2.  THE MANIFOLD MUTABILITIES OF FORTUNE
3.  Jeronimo, you are now growne to an indifferent stature, and (almost)able to take government of your selfe. It cannot then seeme any wayinconvenient, to acquaint you with your deceased Fathers affaires, andby what good courses he came to such wealth. You are his onely sonneand heire, to whom he hath bequeathed his rich possessions (yourMothers moity evermore remembred) and travaile would now seeme fittingfor you, as well to gaine experience in Trafficke and Merchandize,as also to let you see the worlds occurrences. Your Mother therefore(and we have thought it expedient) that you should journey fromhence to Paris, there to continue for some such fitting time, as maygrant you full and free opportunity, to survey what stocke of wealthis there employed for you, and to make you understand, how yourFactors are furtherous to your affaires. Beside, this is the way tomake you a man of more solid apprehension, and perfect instructionin civill courses of life; rather then by continuing here to seenone but Lords, Barons, and Gentlemen, whereof we have too great anumber. When you are sufficiently qualified there, and have learnedwhat belongeth to a worthy Marchant, such as was Leonardo Sighieroyour famous Father; you may returne home againe at your owne pleasure.
4.  Cast an heedfull eye then (good Father) upon all your Gentlemen, andadvisedly examine their vertues, conditions, and manner ofbehaviour. On the other side, observe those parts remaining inGuiscardo: and then if you will Judge truly, and without affection,you will confesse him to be most Noble, and that all your Gentlemen(in respect of him) are but base Groomes and villaines. His vertuesand excelling perfections, I never credited from the report orjudgement of any person; but onely by your speeches, and mine owneeyes as true witnesses. Who did ever more commend Guiscardo, extollingall those singularities in him, most requisite to be in an honestvertuous man; then you your selfe have done? Nor neede you to besorry, or ashamed of your good opinion concerning him: for if mineeyes have not deceived my judgement, you never gave him the least partof praise, but I have knowne much more in him, then ever your wordswere able to expresse: wherefore, if I have beene any way deceived,truly the deceit proceeded onely from you. How wil you then maintaine,that I have throwne my liking on a man of base condition? In troth(Sir) you cannot. Perhaps you will alledge, that he is but meane andpoore; I confesse it, and surely it is to your shame, that you havenot bestowne place of more preferment, on a man so honest and welldeserving, and having bene so long a time your servant.Neverthelesse poverty impayreth not any part of noble Nature, butwealth hurries into horrible confusions. Many Kings and greatPrinces have heeretofore beene poore, when divers of them that havedelved into the earth, and kept Flockes in the field, have beeneadvanced to riches, and exceeded the other in wealth.
5.   The Monke, though his delight with the Damosell was extraordinary,yet feare and suspition followed upon it; for, in the very height ofall his wantonnesse, he heard a soft treading about the doore. Andprying thorow a small crevice in the same dore, perceived apparantly,that the Abbot himselfe stood listening there, and could not beignorant but that the Maide was with him in the Chamber. As afterpleasure ensueth paine, for the veniall Monke knew well enough (thoughwanton heate would not let him heede it before) that most greevouspunishment must bee inflicted on him, which made him sad beyond allmeasure: Neverthelesse, without disclosing his dismay to the yongMaiden, he began to consider with himselfe on many meanes, wherebyto find out one that might best fit his turne. And suddenlyconceited an apt stratagem, which sorted to such effect as he wouldhave it: whereupon, seeming satisfied for that season, he tolde theDamosell, that (being carefull of her credit) as hee had brought herin unseene of any, so he would free her from thence againe, desiringher to tarrie there (without making any noyse at all) untill such timeas he returned to her.
6.  IN SOME EVIDENT DANGER

应用

1.  WHEREBY MAY BEE OBSERVED, THAT SUCH AS WILL SPEAKE CONTEMPTIBLY OF
2.  The Ladie seeing her desire disappointed, and her fond expectationutterly frustrated: grew instantly forgetfull of her intemperate love,and falling into extremity of rage, converted her former gentle andloving speeches, into this harsh and ruder language. Villaine (quothshe) shall the longing comforts of my life, be abridged by thy baseand scornefull deniall? Shall my destruction be wrought by thy mostcurrish unkindenesse, and all my hoped joyes be defeated in amoment? Know Slave, that I did not so earnestly desire thy sweeteembracements before, but now as deadly I hate and despise them;which either thy death or banishment shall deerely pay for. Nosooner had she thus spoken, but tearing her haire, and renting hergarments in peeces, she ranne about like a distracted Woman, cryingout alowd; Helpe, helpe, the Count D'Angiers will forcibly dishonourmee, the lustfull Count will violate mine honour.
3.  It is no long time since, that there lived in Genes or Geneway, aGentleman named Signior Herminio de Grimaldo, who (as every one welknew) was more rich in inheritances, and ready summes of currant moneythen any other knowne Citizen in Italy. And as hee surpassed other menin wealth, so did he likewise excell them in wretched Avarice, beingso miserably greedy and covetous, as no man in the world could be morewicked that way; because, not onely he kept his purse lockt up frompleasuring any, but denied needfull things to himselfe, enduringmany miseries onely to avoid expences, contrary to the Genewayesgenerall custom, who alwayes delighted to be decently cloathed, and tohave their dyet of the best. By reason of which most miserablebasenesse, they tooke away from him the Sirname of Grimaldi, whereofhe was in right descended, and called him master Herminio the covetousMizer, a nickname very notably agreeing with his gripple nature.
4、  Ricciardo durst not speake one word, but still expressed his affablebehaviour towards her, bestowing infinite embraces and kisses onher: which so much the more augmented her rage and anger, continuingon her chiding thus. If by these flatteries and idle follies, thouhopest to comfort or pacifie me, thou runnest quite by as from thyreckoning; for I shall never imagine my selfe halfe satisfied,untill in the presence of my parents, friends, and neighbours, Ihave revealed thy base behaviour. Tell mee, treacherous man, am notI as faire, as the wife of Ricciardo? Am I not as good a Gentlewomanborne, as shee is? What canst thou more respect in her, then is inmee? Villaine, monster, why doest thou not answere mee? I will send toRicciardo, who loveth mee beyond all other women in Naples, and yetcould never vaunt, that I gave him so much as a friendly looke: heshall know, what a dishonour thou hadst intended towards him; whichboth he and his friends will revenge soundly upon thee. Theexclamations of the Lady were so tedious and irksome, that Ricciardoperceiving, if shee continued longer in these complaints, worsewould ensue thereon, then could bee easily remedied: resolved tomake himselfe knowne unto her, to reclaime her out of this violentextasie, and holding her somewhat strictly, to prevent her escapingfrom him, he said. Madam, afflict your selfe no further, for, what Icould not obtaine by simply loving you, subtilty hath better taughtme, and I am your Ricciardo: which she hearing, and perfectlyknowing him by his voyce; shee would have leapt out of the Bath, butshee could not, and to avoyde her crying out, he layde his hand on hermouth, saying. Lady, what is done, cannot now be undone, albeit youcried out all your life time. If you exclaime, or make this knowneopenly by any meanes; two unavoydable dangers must needes ensuethereon. The one (which you ought more carefully to respect) is thewounding of your good renowne and honour, because, when you shall say,that by treacherie I drew you hither: I will boldly maintaine thecontrary, avouching, that having corrupted you with gold, and notgiving you so much as covetously you desired; you grew offended, andthereon made the outcry, and you are not to learne, that the worldis more easily induced to beleeve the worst, then any goodnesse, be itnever so manifest. Next unto this, mortall hatred must arisebetweene your husband and mee, and (perhaps) I shall as soone killhim, as he me; whereby you can hardly, live in any true contentmentafter. Wherefore, joy of my life, doe not in one moment, both shameyour selfe, and cause such perill betweene your husband and me: foryou are not the first, neither can be the last, that shall bedeceived. I have not beguiled you, to take any honour from you, butonely declared, the faithfull affection I beare you, and so shalldoe for ever, as being your bounden and most obedient servant; andas it is a long time agoe, since I dedicated my selfe and all mineto your service, so hence-forth must I remaine for ever. You arewise enough (I know) in all other things: then shew your selfe notto be silly or simple in this.
5、  I cannot tell what was that rare delight,

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  • 丁家云 08-02

      THE THIRD DAY, THE EIGHT NOVELL

  • 阿克伦 08-02

      When night was come, the Provoste also came according toappointment, even when two brethren were in their lodging, they easilyheard his entrance, as Piccarda (being present with them) had informedthem. In went the Provoste without any candle, or making the leastnoise to be heard, and being in Piccardaes Chamber, went to bed:Ciutazza tarrying not long from him, but (as her Mistresse hadinstructed her) she went to bed likewise, not speaking any word atall, and the Provoste, imagining to have her there, whom he sohighly affected, fell to imbracing and kissing Ciutazza, who was asforward in the same manner to him, and there for a while I intend toleave them.

  • 陈灵 08-02

       Thus the innocent Count, by his overhasty and sodaine flight, madehimselfe guilty of this foule imputation: and arriving at Callice withhis children, their poore and homely habites, hid them from beingknowne, and thence they crossed over into England, staying no whereuntill hee came to London. Before he would enter into the City, hegave divers good advertisements to his children, but especially twoprecepts above all the rest. First, with patient soules to support thepoore condition, whereto Fortune (without any offence in him orthem) had thus dejected them. Next, that they should have mostheedfull care, at no time to disclose from whence they came, orwhose children they were, because it extended to the perill of theirlives. His Sonne, being named Lewes, and now about nine yeares old,his Daughter called Violenta, and aged seaven yeares, did both observetheir fathers direction, as afterward it did sufficiently appeare. Andbecause they might live in the safer securitie, hee thought it for thebest to change their names, calling his Sonne Perotto, and hisDaughter Gianetta, for thus they might best escape unknowne.

  • 林铁刚 08-02

      It is not unknowne to you, partly by intelligence from ourreverend predecessours, as also some understanding of your owne,that many time have resorted to our City of Florence, Potestates andOfficers, belonging to the Marquesate of Anconia; who commonly weremen of lowe spirit, and their lives so wretched and penurious, as theyrather deserved to be tearmed Misers, then men. And in regard ofthis their naturall covetousnesse and misery, the Judges would bringalso in their company, such Scribes or Notaries, as being paraleldewith their Masters: they all seemed like Swaines come from the Plough,or bred up in some Coblers quality, rather then Schollers, or Studentsof Law.

  • 金寨 08-01

    {  As the rest, so did Madam Beritola goe on shore in the Iland,where having found a separate and solitary place, fit for her silentand sad meditations, secretly by her selfe, shee sorrowed for theabsence of her husband. Resorting daily to this her sad exercise,and continuing there her complaints, unseene by any of theMarriners, or whosoever else: there arrived suddenly a Galley ofPyrates, who seazing on the small Barke, carried it and all the restin it away with them. When Beritola had finished het wofullcomplaints, as daily shee was accustomed to doe, shee returned backeto her children againe; but find no person there remayning, whereatshe wondered not a little: immediately (suspecting what had happenedindeede) she lent her lookes on the Sea, and saw the Galley, whichas yet had not gone farre, drawing the smaller vessell after her.Hereby plainly she perceyved, that now she had lost her children, asformerly shee had done her husband; being left there poore,forsaken, and miserable, not knowing when, where, or how to findeany of them againe; and calling for her Husband and Children, sheefell downe in a swound uppon the shore.

  • 阿米格 07-31

      Being come home to her owne house, away shee sent the olde Pandresseabout other businesse, which might hold her time long enough ofemployment, and hinder her returning to Andrea according to promise,purposing, not to trust her in this serious piece of service.Calling a young crafty Girle to her, whom she had well tutoured in thelike ambassages, when evening drew on, she sent her to Andreaslodging, where (by good fortune) she found him sitting alone at thedoore, and demanding of him, if he knew an honest Gentleman lodgingthere, whose name was Signior Andrea de Piero; he made her answere,that himselfe was the man. Then taking him aside, she said. Sir, thereis a worthy Gentlewoman of this Citie, that would gladly speake withyou, if you pleased to vouchsafe her so much favour.}

  • 肖恩-巴蒂尔 07-31

      Confession being thus ended, and she receiving such pennance ashee appointed, she arose on her feete, and went to heare Masse;while our jealous Woodcocke (testily puffing and blowing) put offhis Religious habite, returning home presently to his house, beatinghis braines al the way as he went, what meanes he might best devise,for the taking of his wife and the Friar together, whereby to havethem both severely punished. His wife being come home from theChappell, discerned by her Husbands lookes, that he was like tokeepe but a sory Christmasse: yet he used his utmost industry, toconceale what he had done, and which she knew as well as himself.And he having fully resolved, to watch his own street doore the nextnight ensuing in person, in expectation of the Friars comming, saideto his Wife. I have occasion both to suppe and lodge out of my housethis night, wherefore see you the streete doore to be surely made faston the inside, and the doore at the middest of the staires, as alsoyour own Chamber doore, and then (in Gods name) get you to bed.Whereto she answered, that all should be done as hee had appointed.

  • 约翰·博纳 07-31

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL

  • 陈启松 07-30

       THE SEVENTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

  • 卡翁达 07-28

    {  Reynard being thus embraced for Madam Agnesiaes Gossip, and thisproving the onely colourable meanes, for his safer permission ofspeech with her, to let her now understand by word of mouth, what longbefore she collected by his lookes and behaviour: it fell out no waybeneficiall to him, albeit Agnesia seemed not nice or scrupulous inhearing, yet she had a more precious care of her honor. It came topasse, within a while after (whether by seeing his labour vainlyspent, or some other urgent occasion moving him thereto, I know not)Reynard would needs enter into Religion, and whatsoever strictnesse orausteritie hee found to be in that kinde of life, yet he determined topersevere therein, whether it were for his good or ill. And althoughwithin a short space, after he was thus become a Religious Monke,hee seemed to forget the former love which he bare to his gossipAgnesia, and divers other enormous vanities beside: yet let me tellyou, successe of time tutord him in them again(!; and, without anyrespect to his poore ho habite, but rather in contempt thereof (asit were) he tooke an especiall delight, in wearing garments of muchricher esteeme, yet favoured by the same Monasticall profession,appearing (in all respects) like a Court-Minion or Favourite, of asprightly and Poeticall disposition, for composing Verses, Sonnets,and Canzons, singing them to sundry excellent instruments, and yet notgreatly curious of his company, so they were some of the best, andMadame Agnesia one, his former Gossip.

  • 樊虹壹 07-28

      WHEREIN IS APPROVED, THAT HE WHICH OFFERETH SHAME AND DISGRACE TO

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