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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:翟海雷 大小:9da6WFji14395KB 下载:Z5bdiZD569301次
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日期:2020-08-09 17:48:04
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Oh, How can mighty Love permit,
2.  Gisippus hearing this discourse, and seeing how Titus bitterly wept,in agonies of most moving afflictions: sat an indifferent while sadand pensive, as being wounded with affection to Sophronia, but yetin a well-governed and temperate manner without any long delaying, heeconcluded with himselfe; that the life of his friend ought to beaccounted much more deare, then any love hee could beare untoSophronia: And in this resolution, the teares of Titus forcing hiseyes to flow forth like two Fountaines, thus he replyed.
3.  For truth lives not in men:
4.  My honourable and gracious Lord, dispose of me, as you thinkebest, for your owne dignity and contentment, for I shall therewithbe well pleased: as she that knowes her selfe, farre inferiour tothe meanest of your people, much lesse worthy of the honour, wheretoyou liked to advance me.
5.  Massetto, who was not far off from them all this while, but seemedseriously busied about sweeping and making cleane the Court, heard allthese speeches; and being not a little joyfull of them; said tohimselfe. If once I come to worke in your Garden, let the proofe yeeldpraise of my skill and knowledge. When the Fac-totum perceived, thathe knew perfectly how to undergo his businesse, and had questioned himby signes, concerning his willingnesse to serve there still, andreceived the like answere also, of his dutifull readinesse thereto; hegave him order to worke in the Garden, because the season did nowrequire it; and to leave all other affayres for the Monastery,attending now onely the Gardens preparation.
6.  The poore forsaken new married Countesse, could scarsely bepleased with such dishonourable unkindnesse, yet governing herimpatience with no meane discretion, and hoping by her vertuouscarriage, to compasse the meanes of his recall: home she rode toRoussillion, where all the people received her very lovingly. Now,by reason of the Counts so long absence, all things were there farreout of order; mutinies, quarrels, and civill dissentions, havingprocured many dissolute irruptions, to the expence of much blood inmany places. But she, like a jolly stirring Lady, very wise andprovident in such disturbances, reduced all occasions to such civilityagaine, that the people admired her rare behaviour, and condemnedthe Count for his unkindnesse towards her.

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1.  Jeronimo, you are now growne to an indifferent stature, and (almost)able to take government of your selfe. It cannot then seeme any wayinconvenient, to acquaint you with your deceased Fathers affaires, andby what good courses he came to such wealth. You are his onely sonneand heire, to whom he hath bequeathed his rich possessions (yourMothers moity evermore remembred) and travaile would now seeme fittingfor you, as well to gaine experience in Trafficke and Merchandize,as also to let you see the worlds occurrences. Your Mother therefore(and we have thought it expedient) that you should journey fromhence to Paris, there to continue for some such fitting time, as maygrant you full and free opportunity, to survey what stocke of wealthis there employed for you, and to make you understand, how yourFactors are furtherous to your affaires. Beside, this is the way tomake you a man of more solid apprehension, and perfect instructionin civill courses of life; rather then by continuing here to seenone but Lords, Barons, and Gentlemen, whereof we have too great anumber. When you are sufficiently qualified there, and have learnedwhat belongeth to a worthy Marchant, such as was Leonardo Sighieroyour famous Father; you may returne home againe at your owne pleasure.
2.  While this love continued in equall fervency, it chanced upon afaire Summers day, that Restituta walked alone upon the Sea-shore,going from Rocke to Rocke, having a naked knife in her hand, wherewithshe opened such Oysters as shee found among the stones, seeking forsmall pearles enclosed in their shelles. Her walke was very solitaryand shady, with a faire Spring or Well adjoyning to it, and thither(at that very instant time) certaine Sicilian young Gentlemen, whichcame from Naples, had made their retreate. They perceiving theGentlewoman to be very beautifull (she as yet not having any sightof them) and in such a silent place alone by her selfe: concludedtogether, to make a purchase of her, and carry her thence away withthem; as indeed they did, notwithstanding all her out cryes andexclaimes, bearing her perforce aboard their Barke.
3.  The two Brothers, whose pass exceeded their best means forsupport, perceiving some hope how to enjoy their loves; desired nolong time of deliberation, or greatly disputed with their thoughtswhat was best to be done: but readily replyed, that let happen anydanger whatsoever, they would joyne with him in this determination,and he should partake with them in their wealthiest fortunes. AfterRestagnone had heard their answer, within some few dayes following, hewent to confer with Ninetta, which was no easie matter for him tocompasse. Neverthelesse, opportunity proved so favourable to him, thatmeeting with her at a private place appointed, he discoursed at large,what had passed betweene him and the other two young Gentlemen,maintaining the same with many good reasons, to have her like andallow of the enterprize. Which although (for a while) he could veryhardly doe; yet, in regard shee had more desire then power, withoutsuspition to be daily in his company, she thus answered. My heartschosen friend, I cannot any way mislike your advice, and will takesuch order with my Sisters, that they shal agree to our resolution.Let it therefore be your charge, that you and the rest make everything ready, to depart from hence so soone, as with best convenientmeanes we may be enabled.
4.  Madame Oretta, being a Lady of unequalled ingenuitie, admirable injudgement, and most delicate in her speech, was afflicted in soule,beyond all measure; overcome with many colde sweates, and passionateheart-aking qualmes, to see a Foole thus in a Pinne-fold, and unableto get out, albeit the doore stood wide open to him, whereby sheebecame so sicke; that, converting her distaste to a kinde ofpleasing acceptation, merrily thus she spake. Beleeve me Sir, yourhorse trots so hard, and travels so uneasily; that I entreate you tolet me walke on foot againe.
5.  I know no Lady living,
6.  In this honourable order (observed as his estated custom) hepersevered so long a while, as not onely the East parts, but alsothose in the west, were every where acquainted with his fame andrenown. Being already well stept into yeares, but yet not wearie(therefore) of his great charge and liberality: it fortuned, thatthe rumor of his noble Hospitality, came to the eare of anothergallant Gentleman, named Mithridanes, living in a Countrey not farreoff from the other.

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1.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED THAT GOOD MEN DOE SOMETIMES FALL INTO BAD
2.  After some indifferent respite of time, it chanced that the youngDamosel (who was named Iphigenia) awaked before any of the otherwith her, and lifted up her head, with her eyes wide open, she sawChynon standing before her, leaning still on his staffe; whereatmarvailing not a little, she saide unto him: Chynon, whither wanderestthou, or what dost thou seeke for in this wood? Chynon, who notonely by his countenance but likewise his folly, Nobility of birth,and wealthy possessions of his father, was generally knowne throughoutthe Countrey, made no answere at all to the demand of Iphigenia: butso soone as he beheld her eyes open, he began to observe them with aconstant regard, and being perswaded in his soule, that from themflowed such an unutterable singularity, as he had never felt tillthen. Which the young Gentlewoman well noting, she began to waxfearefull, least these stedfast lookes of his, should incite hisrusticity to some attempt, which might redound to her dishonour:wherefore awaking her women and servants, and they all being risen,she saide. Farewell Chynon, I leave thee to thine owne good Fortune;whereto hee presently replyed, saying: I will go with you. Now,although the Gentlewoman refused his company, as dreading some acte ofincivility from him: yet could she not devise any way to be rid ofhim, till he had brought her to her owne dwelling, where takingleave mannerly of her, he went directly home to his Fathers house,saying: Nothing should compell him to live any longer in the muddyCountry. And albeit his Father was much offended hereat, and all therest of his kindred and friends: (yet not knowing how to helpe it)they suffered him to continue there still, expecting the cause of thishis so sodaine alteration, from the course of life, which contentedhim so highly before.
3.  But, as we see it oftentimes come to passe, that by how much thelower hope declineth, so much the higher love ascendeth; even sofell it out with this poore Querry; for, most irkesome was it tohim, to endure the heavy waight of his continuall oppressions, nothaving any hope at all of the very least mitigation. And being utterlyunable to relinquish his love divers times he resolved on somedesperate conclusion, which might yet give the world an evidenttestimony, that he dyed for the love he bare to the Queene. And uponthis determination, hee grounded the successe of his future fortune,to dye in compassing some part of his desire, without eitherspeaking to the Queene, or sending any missive of his love; for tospeake or write, were meerely in vaine, and drew on a worserconsequence then death, which he could bestow on himselfe more easily,and when he listed.
4.  Calandrino stood scratching his head an indifferent while, andthen sodainly replyed thus. Now trust me Bruno, it is to beedoubted, because he called her at his Window, and she immediatlywent up to his Chamber. But what doe I care if it be so? Have notthe Gods themselves bene beguiled of their Wenches, who were bettermen then ever Phillippo can be, and shall I stand in feare of him?Bruno replied: Be patient Calandrino, I will enquire what Woman sheis, and if she be not the wife or friend to our young masterPhillippo, with faire perswasions I can over-rule the matter,because shee is a familiar acquaintance of mine. But how shall weedoe, that Buffalmaco may not know heereof? I can never speake toher, if hee be in my company. For Buffalmaco (quoth Calandrino) I haveno feare at all, but rather of Nello, because he is a neer Kinsmanto my wife, and he is able to undo me quite, if once it should come tohis hearing. Thou saist well, replyed Bruno, therefore the matter hathneede to be very cleanly carried.
5.   Adriano (on the other side) perceiving how wisely the womanexcused her owne shame and her daughters; to backe her in abusinesse so cunningly begun, he called to Panuccio, saying. Havenot I tolde thee an hundred times, that thou art not fit to lye anywhere, out of thine owne lodging? What a shame is this baseimperfection to thee, by rising and walking thus in the night-time,according as thy dreames doe wantonly delude thee, and cause thee toforsake thy bed, telling nothing but lies and fables, yet avouchingthem for manifest truthes? Assuredly this will procure no meane perillunto thee: Come hither, and keepe in thine owne bedde for meere shame.
6.  CONTAINING AN EXCELLENT ADMONITION, THAT SUCH AS COVET TO HAVE

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1.  Gracious company, there is no defect in this Banquet, or more debarsit of the honour it might else have, but onely the presence ofTheobaldo, who having bin continually in your company, it seemes youare not willing to take knowledge of him, and therefore I meane myselfe to shew him. So, uncasing himselfe out of his Pilgrimes clothes,and standing in his Hose and Doublet, to their no little admiration,they all knew him, yet doubted whether it were he, or no. Which heperceiving, he repeated his brethrens and absent kindreds names, andwhat occurrences hapned betweene them from time to time, beside therelation of his owne passed fortunes, inciting teares in the eyes ofhis brethren, and all else there present, every one hugging andembracing him, yea, many beside, who were no kin at all to him.Hermelina onely excepted: which when Aldobrandino saw, he said untoher; How now Hermelina? Why doest thou not welcome home Theobaldo,so kindly as the rest have done?
2.  When Sir Roger had received the royall reward, for thus surrenderingthe Count and his Sonne, the Count calling him to him, saide. Takethat Princely remuneration of my soveraigne Lord and King, andcommending me to your unkinde Father, tell him that your Childrenare no beggars brats, neither basely borne by their Mothers side.Sir Roger returning home with his bountifull reward, soone afterbrought his Wife and Mother to Paris, and so did Perotto his Wifewhere in great joy and triumph, they continued with while with thenoble Count; who had all his goods and honours restored to him, infarre greater measure then ever they were before: his Sonnes in Lawreturning home with their Wives into England, left the Count withthe King at Paris, where he spent the rest of his dayes in greathonour and felicity.
3.  COURTESIE, OF A TRUE AND CONSTANT LOVER: AS ALSO THE
4、  Poore Simonida, sighing and sorrowing for her deere loves losse, and(perhappes) not meanly terrified, with the strict infliction oftorment so severely urged and followed by Strambo and the reststanding dumb still, without answering so much as one word; by tastingof the same Sage, fell downe dead by the bed, even by the likeaccident Pasquino formerly did, to the admirable astonishment of allthere present.
5、  With Chaplets of Flowers,

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网友评论(7kWvmQFi77156))

  • 王金辉 08-08

      WHEREBY PLAINLY APPEARETH, THAT A SODAINE WITTY AND MERRY ANSWER,

  • 华严岗 08-08

      Overcome with excesse of joy, which made the teares to trickle downehis cheekes, he proffered to embrace and kisse the Maide: but sherefusing his kindnesse, because (as yet) she knew no reason for it,hee turned himselfe to Jacomino, saying. My deare brother andfriend, this Maide is my Daughter, and my House was the same whichGuidotto spoyled, in the generall havocke of our City, and thence hecarried this childe of mine, forgotten (in the fury) by my Wife herMother. But happy was the houre of his becomming her Father, andcarrying her away with him; for else she had perished in the fire,because the House was instantly burnt downe to the ground. TheMayden hearing his words, observing him also to be a man of yeeres andgravity: she beleeved what he saide, and humbly submitted her selfe tohis kisses and embraces, even as instructed thereto by instinct ofnature. Bernardino instantly sent for his wife, her owne Mother, hisdaughters, sonnes, and kindred, who being acquainted with thisadmirable accident, gave her most gracious and kinde welcome, hereceiving her from Jacomino as his childe, and the legacies whichGuidotto had left her.

  • 黎斌 08-08

       Our worthy wise Doctor, whose best skill scarsely extended so farre,as to cure the itch in Children; gave such sound beleefe to therelation of Bruno, as any man could doe, to the most certaine truth ofife or death: having his desire immeasurably enflamed, to bee made amember of this straunge Societie, which hee more coveted, then anything in the world beside, accounting it a felicity farre beyond allother.

  • 刘桦 08-08

      RESPECTIVELY ON THEIR OWNE IMPERFECTIONS

  • 谭利华 08-07

    {  It came to passe, that two other young Gallants, the one namedFolco, and the other Hugnetto, (who had attained to incredible wealth,by the decease of their Father) were also as far in love, the one withMagdalena, and the other with Bertella. When Restagnone hadintelligence thereof, by the meanes of his faire friend Ninetta, hepurposed to releeve his poverty, by friendly furthering both theirlove, and his owne: and growing into familiarity with them, onewhile he would walke abroad with Folco, and then againe with Hugnetto,but oftner with them both together, to visite their Mistresses, andcontinue worthy friendship. On a day, when hee saw the time suteableto his intent, and that hee had invited the two Gentlemen home untohis House, he fell into this like Conference with them.

  • 肖雨 08-06

      I durst not moove, to speake I was affrayde.}

  • 亨特 08-06

      THE EIGHT DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL

  • 阿布拉莫维奇 08-06

      Eighteene yeeres were now fully overpast, since the CountD'Angiers fled from Paris, having suffered (in miserable sort) manyhard and lamentable adversities; and seeing himselfe now to begrowne aged, hee was desirous to leave Ireland, and to know (if heemight) what was become of both his Children. Heereupon, perceiving hiswonted forme to be so altered, that such as formerly had conversedmost with him, could now not take any knowledge of him, and feelinghis body (through long labour and exercise endured in service) morelustie then in his idle youthfull yeeres, especially when he leftthe Court of France, hee purposed to proceede in his determination.Being verie poore and simple in apparrel, he departed from the IrishEarle his Master, with whom he had continued long in service, to noadvantage or advancement, and crossing over into England, travayled tothe place in Wales, where he left Perotto, and where he found him tobe Lord Marshall and President of the country, lusty and in goodhealth, a man of goodly feature, and most honorably respected andreverenced of the people.

  • 林德志 08-05

       This lost kinde of life in him, was no meane burthen of greefeunto his Noble Father, and all hope being already spent, of any futurehappy recovery, he gave command (because he would not alwaies havesuch a sorrow in his sight) that he should live at a Farme of his ownein a Country Village, among his Peazants and Plough-Swaines. Which wasnot any way distastefull to Chynon, but well agreed with his ownenaturall disposition; for their rurall qualities, and grosse behaviourpleased him beyond the Cities civility. Chynon living thus at hisFathers Countrey Village, exercising nothing else but ruralldemeanour, such as then delighted him above all other: it chanced upona day about the houre of noone, as hee was walking over the fields,with a long staffe on his necke, which commonly he used to carry; heentred in to a small thicket, reputed the goodliest in all thosequarters, and by reason it was then the month of May, the Trees hadtheir leaves fairely shot forth.

  • 蒋浩 08-03

    {  The Queene, knowing him to be a man full of mirth and matter,began to consider very advisedly, that he would not have mooved thisrequest, but onely to the end, that if the company grew wearied by anyof the Tales re-counted, hee would shut up the dayes disport with somemirthfull accident. Wherefore willingly, and with consent of all therest he had his suite granted. So, arising all, they walked to aChristall river, descending downe a little hill into a valley,graciously shaded with goodly Trees; where washing both their handsand feete, much pretty pleasure passed among them; till supper timedrawing neere, made them returne home to the Palace. When supper wasended, and bookes and instruments being laide before them, theQueene commanded a dance, and that Madam Aemilia, assisted by MadamLauretta and Dioneus, should sing a sweet ditty. At which command,Lauretta undertooke the dance, and led it, Aemilia singing this songensuing.

  • 方历娇 08-03

      The Abbot pretending great admiration at this accident, called hisMonkes about him, all labouring by rubbing his temples, throwingcold water and vinegar in his face, to revive him againe; alleagingthat some fume or vapour in the stomacke, had thus over-awed hisunderstanding faculties, and quite deprived him of life indeede. Atlength, when by tasting the pulse, and all their best employed paines,they saw that their labour was spent in vaine; the Abbot used suchperswasions to the Monkes, that they all beleeved him to be dead:whereupon they sent for his wife and friends, who crediting as much asthe rest did, were very sad and sorrowfull for him.

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