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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陈宝玉 大小:FmvVBtsc84609KB 下载:Yo8sG5mk33074次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:7rT27vbl79295条
日期:2020-08-09 02:56:06
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Falling from one discourse to another, they beganne to talke of suchprayers, as men (in journey) use to salute God withall; and one of theTheeves (they being three in number) spake thus to Rinaldo. Sir, letit be no offence to you, that I desire to know, what prayer you mostuse when thus you travell on the way? Whereto Rinaldo replyed inthis manner. To tell you true Sir, I am a man grosse enough in suchDivine matters, as medling more with Merchandize, then I do withBookes. Neverthelesse, at all times when I am thus in journey, inthe morning before I depart my Chamber, I say a Pater noster, and anAve Maria for the soules of the father and mother of Saint Julian; andafter that, I pray God and S. Julian to send me a good lodging atnight. And let me tell you Sir, that very oftentimes heeretofore, Ihave met with many great dangers upon the way, from all which Istill escaped, and evermore (when night drew on) I came to anexceeding good Lodging. Which makes mee firmely beleeve, that SaintJulian (in honour of whom I speake it) hath beggd of God such greatgrace for me; and mee thinkes, that if any day I should faile ofthis prayer in the morning: I cannot travaile securely, nor come toa good lodging. No doubt then Sir (quoth the other) but you have saidethat prayer this morning? I would be sory else, said Rinaldo, suchan especiall matter is not to be neglected.
2.  Sonne thou art happily returned, yet there is not any man in ourCitie, but doth verily beleeve thee to bee dead, and therefore doe notmuch wonder at our feare. Moreover, I dare assure thee, that thyWife Adalietta, being conquered by the controuling command, andthreatnings of her kinred (but much against her owne minde) is thisvery morning to be married to a new husband, and the marriage feast issolemnly prepared, in honour of this second nuptialls.
3.  Sometime (Honourable Ladies) there lived in the City of Imola, a manof most lewd and wicked life; named, Bertho de la messa, whoseshamelesse deedes were so well knowne to all the Citizens, and wonsuch respect among them; as all his lies could not compasse anybeleefe, no, not when he delivered a matter of sound truth. Wherefore,perceiving that his lewdnesse allowed him no longer dwelling there;like a desperate adventurer, he transported himselfe thence to Venice,the receptacle of all foule sinne and abhomination, intending there toexercise his wonted bad behaviour, and live as wickedly as ever he haddone before. It came to passe, that some remorse of conscience tookehold of him, for the former passages of his dissolute life, and hepretended to be surprized with very great devotion, becomming muchmore Catholike then any other man, taking on him the profession of aFranciscane coldelier, and calling himselfe, Fryar Albert of Imola.
4.  The night being over-past with infinite feares and afrights, andbright day saluting the world againe, with the expence of ninehoures and more, she fell to her former fruitlesse travailes. Beingsomewhat sharply bitten with hunger, because the former day andnight shee had not tasted any foode: shee made therefore a benefitof necessity, and fed on the greene hearbes so well as she could,not without any piercing afflictions, what should become of her inthis extraordinary misery. As shee walked in these pensivemeditations, she saw a Goate enter into a Cave, and (within a whileafter) come forth againe, wandring along thorow the woods. Whereuponshe stayed, and entred where she saw the beast issue foorth, where shefound two young Kids, yeaned (as it seemed) the selfesame day, whichsight was very pleasing to her, and nothing in that distresse couldmore content her.
5.  Hereupon, Saladine embracing him, and kissing his forehead, said.All my Gods goe with you, and guard you from any perill, departingso out of the Chamber weeping, and his Baschaes (having likewise takentheir leave of Thorello) followed Saladine into the Hall, whereasthe Bedde stood readily prepared? Because it waxed very late, andthe Magitian also there attending for his dispatch: the Phisitian wentwith the potion to Thorello, and perswading him, in the way offriendship, that it was onely to strengthen him after his greatweaknes: he drank it off, being thereby immediately entraunced, and sopresently sleeping, was (by Saladines command,) laid on thesumptuous and costly Bed, whereon stood an Imperiall Crowne ofinfinite value, appearing (by a description engraven on it) thatSaladine sent it to Madame Adalietta, the wife of Thorello. On hisfinger also hee put a Ring, wherein was enchased an admirableCarbuncle, which seemed like a flaming Torche, the value thereof notto bee estimated. By him likewise hee laid a rich sword, with thegirdle, hangers, and other furniture, such as seldome can be seene thelike. Then hee laid a jewell on the Pillow by him, so sumptuouslieembelished with Pearles and precious Stones, as might have beseemedthe greatest Monarch in the World to weare. Last of all, on eitherside of them, hee set two great Basons of pure Gold, full of doubleducates, many cords of Orient Pearles, Rings, Girdles, and othercostly jewells (over-tedious to bee recounted) and kissing him oncemore as hee lay in the bedde, commanded the Magitian to dispatch andbe gone.
6.  Ghinotto di Tacco; tooke the Lord Abbot of Clugni as his prisoner,and cured him of a grievous disease, which he had in his stomacke, andafterwards set him at libert. The same Lord Abbot when hee returnedfrom the Court Rome, reconciled Ghinotto to Pope Boniface; who madehim a Knight, and Lord Prior of a goodly Hospitall.

计划指导

1.  Ghinotto di Tacco, being advertised of his comming, spred abouthis scouts and nettes, and without missing so much as one Page, shutup the Abbot, with all his traine and baggage, in a place of narrowrestraint, out of which he could by no meanes escape. When this wasdone, he sent one of his most sufficient attendants (well accompanyed)to the Lord Abbot, who said to him in his Masters name, that if hisLordship were so pleased, hee might come and visite Ghinotto at hisCastle. Which the Abbot hearing, answered chollerickly, that hewould not come thither, because hee had nothing to say to Ghinotto:but meant to proceed on in his journy, and would faine see, whodurst presume to hinder his passe. To which rough words, the messengerthus mildely answered. My Lord (quoth he) you are arrived in such aplace, where we feare no other force, but the all-controlling power ofheaven, clearely exempted from the Popes thunder-cracks, ofmaledictions, interdictions, excommunications, or whatsoever else: andtherefore it would bee much better for you, if you pleased to do asGhinotto adviseth you.
2.  The harsh and uncivill usage in her, grew very distastefull toAnastasio, and so unsufferable, that after a long time of fruitlesseservice, requited still with nothing but coy disdaine; desperateresolutions entred into his brain, and often he was minded to killhimselfe. But better thoughts supplanting those furious passions, heabstained from any such violent act; and governed by more manlyconsideration, determined, that as shee hated him, he would requiteher with the like, if he could: wherein he became altogether deceived,because as his hopes grew to a dayly decaying, yet his love enlargedit selfe more and more.
3.  TO MAKE THEM REQUITALL IN THE SELFESAME KINDE
4.  Having thus spoken, she fell to weeping, and then thus beganagain. Poore wretched woman as I am, in an unfortunate houre was Iborne, and in a much worse, when I was made thy Wife. I could have hada proper, handsome yong man; one, that would have maintained mee braveand gallantly: but, beast as I was, to forgoe my good, and cast myselfe away on such a beggar as thou art, and whom none wold havehad, but such an Asse as I. Other women live at hearts ease, and injollity, have their amorous friends and loving Paramours, yea, one,two, three at once, making their husbands looke like a Moone cressent,wheron they shine Sun-like, with amiable lookes, because they know nothow to helpe it: when I (poore foole) live heere at home a miserablelife, not daring once to dreame of such follies, an innocent soule,heartlesse and harmelesse.
5.  Having done so, then repaire to Rinuccio Palermini, and say. MyMistresse Francesca is ready to make acceptance of your love;provided, that you will do one thing for her sake. Namely, thisensuing night, in the midst and stillest season thereof, to go tothe grave where Scannadio was this morning buried, and (without makingany noise) or speaking one word, whatsoever you shall heare or see: totake him forth of the grave, and bring him home to her house, wher youshal know the reason of this strange businesse, and enjoy her freelyas your owne for ever. But if he refuse to do it, then I commaund him,never hereafter to see me, or move further suite unto mee, by anymeanes whatsoever.
6.  Thy happy thrall to bee.

推荐功能

1.  I crie you mercie Sir, replyed Striguario, I bargained with yourWife for this brewing Fat, which I finde to be whole and sound: onlyit is uncleane within, hard crusted with some dry soile upon it, whichI know not well how to get off, if you will be the meanes of making itcleane, I have the money heere ready for it. For that Sir (quothPeronella) take you no care, although no match at all had beenemade, what serves my Husband for, but to make it cleane? Yesforsooth Sir, answered sily Lazaro, you shall have it neate and cleanebefore you pay the mony.
2.  No doubt, but that these were strange newes to Alessandro, andseemed meerely as a miracle to him. What shee was, he knew not, but inregard of her traine and company, hee reputed her to be both noble andrich, as also she was wonderfull faire and beautifull. His ownefortunes stood out of future expectation by his kinsmens overthrow,and his great losses in England; wherefore, upon an opportunity sofairely offered, he held it no wisedome to returne refusall, butaccepted her gracious motion, and referred all to her disposing.Shee arising out of her bed, called him to a little Table standing by,where hung a faire Crucifixe upon the wall; before which, andcalling him to witnesse, that suffered such bitter and cruell tormentson his Crosse, putting a Ring upon his finger, there she faithfullyespoused him, refusing all the world, to be onely his: which beingon either side confirmed solemnly, by an holy Vow, and chastekisses; shee commanded him backe to his Chamber, and she returned toher bed againe, sufficiently satisfied with her Loves acceptation, andso they journied on till they came to Rome.
3.  WHEREON, UNDER THE GOVERNMENT OF PAMPHILUS, THE SEVERALL
4.  It fortuned within few dayes after that Madam Lisetta being incompany with one of her Gossips, and their conference (as commonlyit falleth out to be) concerning other women of the City; theirbeauty, behaviour, amorous suters and servants, and generall opinionconceived of their worth, and merit; wherein Lisetta was over-muchconceyted of her selfe, not admitting any other to be her equall.Among other speeches, savouring of an unseasoned braine: Gossip (quothshe) if you knew what account is made of my beauty, and who holdesit in no meane estimation, you would then freely confesse, that Ideserve to be preferred before any other. As women are ambitious intheir owne opinions, so commonly are they covetous of one anotherssecrets, especially in matter of emulation, whereupon the Gossipthus replyed. Beleeve me Madam, I make no doubt but your speechesmay be true, in regard of your admired beauty, and many otherperfections beside; yet let me tell you, priviledges, how great andsingular soever they be, without they are knowen to others, besidesuch as do particularly enjoy them; they carry no more account, thenthings of ordinary estimation. Whereas on the contrary, when anyLady or Gentlewoman hath some eminent and peculiar favour, which fewor none other can reach unto, and it is made famous by generallnotion; then do all women else admire and honor her, as the glory oftheir kinde, and a miracle of Nature.
5.   Supposing there to finde a solemne peace:
6.  At these wordes the Pilgrime sighed, and then proceeded on againethus. Surely Madame, this one onely sin, may justly torment you,because I know for a certainty, that Theobaldo never offered you anyin many, the day hee first became enamoured of you; and what graceor favour you affoorded him, was your owne voluntary gift, and (ashe tooke it) no more then in modesty might well become you; for heeloving you first, you had beene most cruell and unkinde, if you shouldnot have requited him with the like affection. If then he continued sojust and loyall to you, as (of mine owne knowledge) I am able to sayhe did; what should move you to repulse him so rudely? Such mattersought well to bee considered on before hand; for if you did imagine,that you should repent it as an action ill done, yet you could not doeit, because as hee became yours, so were you likewise onely his; andhe being yours, you might dispose of him at your pleasure, as beingtruely obliged to none but you. How could you then with-draw yourselfe from him, being onely his, and not commit most manifest theft, afarre unfitting thing for you to doe, except you had gone with hisconsent.

应用

1.  Among my other miseries and misfortunes, which hath halfe brokenmy heart in the meere repetition, beside the sad and afflictingsufferance; two things there are, which if I cannot compasse tohave, all hope is quite frustrate for ever, of gaining the grace of myLord and Husband. Yet these two things may I obtaine by your helpe, ifall be true which I have heard, and you can therein best resolvemee. Since my comming to this City, it hath credibly bene told me,that the Count my husband, is deeply in love with your daughter. Ifthe Count (quoth the Ladie) love my daughter, and have a wife of hisowne, he must thinke, and so shall surely finde it, that hisgreatnesse is no priviledge for him, whereby to worke dishonour uponher poverty. But indeede, some apparances there are, and such a matteras you speake of, may be so presumed; yet so farre from a very thoughtof entertaining in her or me; as whatsoever I am able to doe, to yeeldyou any comfort and content, you shall find me therein both willingand ready: for I prize my daughters spotlesse poverty at as high arate, as he can doe the pride of his honour.
2.  In the end of all when I was come home into mine owne house, thisdivellish and accursed woman, being aloft uppon my stayres head, bymuch misfortune chanced to see me; in regard (as it is not unknowne toyou) that women cause all things to lose their vertue. In whichrespect, I that could have stild my selfe the onely happy man inFlorence, am now made most miserable. And therefore did I justly beateher, so long as she was able to stand against mee, and I know noreason to the contrary, why I should not yet teare her in a thousandpeeces: for I may well curse the day of our mariage, to hinder andbereave me of such an invisible blessednesse.
3.  But now mine error I do plainly see:
4、  I heard a Nimph that sate alone,
5、  But now concerning the third matter to be adventured, it drove herto a much more serious consideration, then those two which shee hadalready so well and exactly performed. Notwithstanding, like a Ladieof unconquerable spirit, and (in whom) Love enlarged his power moreand more: she sodainly conceited, what course was best to bee keptin this case, forming her attempt in this manner. Upon Nicostratuswayted two young Gentlemen, as Pages of his Chamber, whose Fathers hadgiven them to his service, to learne the manners of honourableCourtship, and those qualities necessarily required in Gentlemen.One of them, when Nicostratus sate downe to dinner or supper, stood inOffice of his Carver, delivering him all the meats whereon he fed. Theother (as Taster) attended on his Cup, and he dranke no otherdrinke, but what hee brought him, and they both were highly pleasingunto him.

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网友评论(MR17tDFe50067))

  • 张越 08-08

      For truth lives not in men,

  • 戴梦 08-08

      Lovely Companions, although that Madam Pampinea, more in her ownecourtesie, then any matter of merit remaining in me, hath made me yourQueene: I am not determined, to alter the forme of our intendedlife, nor to be guided by mine owne judgement, but to associate thesame with your assistance. And because you may know what I intend todo, and so (consequently) adde or diminish at your pleasure; in veryfew words, you shall plainly understand my meaning. If you have wellconsidered on the course, which this day hath bene kept by MadamPampinea, me thinkes it hath bene very pleasing and commendable; inwhich regard, untill by over-tedious continuation, or otheroccasions of irkesome offence, it shall seeme injurious, I am of theminde, not to alter it. Holding on the order then as we have begunto doe, we will depart from hence to recreate our selves a while,and when the Sun groweth towards setting, we will sup in the fresh andopen ayre; afterward, with Canzonets and other pastimes, we willout-weare the houres till bed time. To morrow morning, in the freshand gentle breath thereof, we will rise and walke to such places, asevery one shall finde fittest for them, even as already this day wehave done; untill due time shall summon us hither againe, tocontinue our discoursive Tales, wherein (me thinkes) consisteth bothpleasure and profit, especially by discreete observation.

  • 李文启 08-08

       WHEREIN IS DECLARED, OF WHAT WORTH IT IS TO CONFESSE

  • 齐达内 08-08

      A querry of the Stable, belonging to Agilulffo, King of theLombardes, found the meanes of accesse to the Queenes bed, without anyknowledge or consent in her. This being secretly discovered by theKing, and the party known, he gave him a marke, by shearing thehaire of his head. Whereupon, he that was so shorne, shearedlikewise the heads of all his fellowes in the lodging, and soescaped the punishment intended towards him.

  • 张小国 08-07

    {  THAT TRUELY KNOW HOW TO USE THEM

  • 彭定 08-06

      To cheare my long dismay:}

  • 蔡依伯 08-06

      The Provoste gaining no other grace at this time, would not sogive over for this first repulse, but pursuing her still withunbeseeming importunity; many private meanes he used to her byLetters, tokens, and insinuating ambassages; yea, whensoever shee cameto the Church, he never ceased his wearisome solicitings. Whereatshe growing greatly offended, and perceyving no likelyhood of hisdesisting; became so tyred with his tedious suite, that she consideredwith her selfe, how she might dispatch him as he deserved, because shesaw no other remedy. Yet shee would not attempte anie thing in thiscase, without acquainting her Bretheren first therwith. And havingtolde them, how much shee was importuned by the Provost, and also whatcourse she meant to take (wherin they both counselled and encouragedher:) within a few daies after, shee went to Church as she was wont todo; where so soone as the Provost espyed her: forthwith he came toher, and according to his continued course, he fell into his amorouscourting. She looking upon him with a smiling countenance, and walkingaside with him out of any hearing: after he had spent many impertinentspeeches, shee (venting foorth manie a vehement sighe) at lengthreturned him this answer.

  • 拉贝 08-06

      Thorello (whom the Soldane called by no other name, then theChristian, neyther of them knowing the other) sadly now remembredhis departure from Pavia, devising and practising many times, how hemight escape thence, but could not compasse it by any possible meanes.Wherefore, certaine Ambassadours beeing sent by the Genewayes, toredeeme divers Cittizens of theirs, there detained as prisoners, andbeing ready to returne home againe: he purposed to write to hisWife, that he was living, and wold repaire to her so soone as hecould, desiring the still continued rememberance of her limitedtime. By close and cunning meanes hee wrote the Letter, earnestlyintreating one of the Ambassadors (who knew him perfectly, but made nooutward apparance thereof) to deale in such sort for him, that theLetter might be delivered to the handes of the Abbot Di San Pietroin Ciel d'Oro, who was (indeede) his Unckle.

  • 顿·沃 08-05

       And not in justice punish it

  • 高冈早纪 08-03

    {  Scarcely were these words concluded, but she felt the custome ofwomen to come upon her, with the paines and throwes incident tochilding: wherefore, with helpe of the aged Lady, Mother to SigniorGentile, it was not long before her deliverance of a goodly Sonne,which greatly augmented the joy of her and Gentile, who tooke order,that all things belonging to a woman in such a case, were not wanting,but she was as carefully respected, even as if she had been his owneWife. Secretly he repaired to Modena, where having given direction forhis place of authority; he returned back againe to Bologna, andthere made preparation for a great and solemne feast, appointing whoshould be his invited guests, the very chiefest persons in Bologna,and (among them) Signior Nicoluccio Caccianimico the especiall man.

  • 华怀特 08-03

      True it is Wife (quoth he) that little credit should bee given todreames: neverthelesse, when they deliver advertisement of harmes toensue, there is nothing lost by shunning and avoiding them. Shefleering in his face, and shaking her head at him, replyed. Suchharmes as thou wishest, such thou dreamest of. Thou pretendest muchpittie and care of me, but all to no other end: but what mischeefesthou dreamest happening unto mee, so wouldest thou see them effectedon me. Wherefore, I will well enough looke to my selfe, both this day,and at all times else: because thou shalt never make thy selfemerry, with any such misfortune as thou wishest unto me.

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