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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:博士雷南 大小:CcKEd2w240256KB 下载:ea8IktbH50856次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:WqY9feNN50019条
日期:2020-08-03 09:57:19
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Thus did they converse, and presently the swineherds came up withthe pigs, which were then shut up for the night in their sties, anda tremendous squealing they made as they were being driven intothem. But Eumaeus called to his men and said, "Bring in the best pigyou have, that I may sacrifice for this stranger, and we will taketoll of him ourselves. We have had trouble enough this long timefeeding pigs, while others reap the fruit of our labour."
2.  "Offer a prayer, sir," said he, "to King Neptune, for it is hisfeast that you are joining; when you have duly prayed and made yourdrink-offering, pass the cup to your friend that he may do so also.I doubt not that he too lifts his hands in prayer, for man cannot livewithout God in the world. Still he is younger than you are, and ismuch of an age with myself, so I he handed I will give you theprecedence."
3.  "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."
4.  Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."
5.  "So be it, old friend," answered Telemachus, "but I am come nowbecause I want to see you, and to learn whether my mother is stillat her old home or whether some one else has married her, so thatthe bed of Ulysses is without bedding and covered with cobwebs."
6.  "When they reached Circe's house they found it built of cutstones, on a site that could be seen from far, in the middle of theforest. There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all roundit- poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantmentsand drugged into subjection. They did not attack my men, but waggedtheir great tails, fawned upon them, and rubbed their noses lovinglyagainst them. As hounds crowd round their master when they see himcoming from dinner- for they know he will bring them something- evenso did these wolves and lions with their great claws fawn upon my men,but the men were terribly frightened at seeing such strange creatures.Presently they reached the gates of the goddess's house, and as theystood there they could hear Circe within, singing most beautifullyas she worked at her loom, making a web so fine, so soft, and ofsuch dazzling colours as no one but a goddess could weave. On thisPolites, whom I valued and trusted more than any other of my men,said, 'There is some one inside working at a loom and singing mostbeautifully; the whole place resounds with it, let us call her and seewhether she is woman or goddess.'

计划指导

1.  "Hear me, O King, whoever you may be, and save me from the angerof the sea-god Neptune, for I approach you prayerfully. Any one whohas lost his way has at all times a claim even upon the gods,wherefore in my distress I draw near to your stream, and cling tothe knees of your riverhood. Have mercy upon me, O king, for I declaremyself your suppliant."
2.  As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.
3.  So saying she bound on her glittering golden sandals,imperishable, with which she can fly like the wind over land or sea;she grasped the redoubtable bronze-shod spear, so stout and sturdy andstrong, wherewith she quells the ranks of heroes who have displeasedher, and down she darted from the topmost summits of Olympus,whereon forthwith she was in Ithaca, at the gateway of Ulysses' house,disguised as a visitor, Mentes, chief of the Taphians, and she helda bronze spear in her hand. There she found the lordly suitorsseated on hides of the oxen which they had killed and eaten, andplaying draughts in front of the house. Men-servants and pages werebustling about to wait upon them, some mixing wine with water in themixing-bowls, some cleaning down the tables with wet sponges andlaying them out again, and some cutting up great quantities of meat.
4.  "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.
5.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.
6.  "Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what youwere a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and yourcolour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods thatlive in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you duesacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."

推荐功能

1.  At this moment the bow was in the hands of Eurymachus, who waswarming it by the fire, but even so he could not string it, and he wasgreatly grieved. He heaved a deep sigh and said, "I grieve formyself and for us all; I grieve that I shall have to forgo themarriage, but I do not care nearly so much about this, for there areplenty of other women in Ithaca and elsewhere; what I feel most is thefact of our being so inferior to Ulysses in strength that we cannotstring his bow. This will disgrace us in the eyes of those who are yetunborn."
2.  As he said this he crept from under his bush, and broke off abough covered with thick leaves to hide his nakedness. He lookedlike some lion of the wilderness that stalks about exulting in hisstrength and defying both wind and rain; his eyes glare as he prowlsin quest of oxen, sheep, or deer, for he is famished, and will darebreak even into a well-fenced homestead, trying to get at the sheep-even such did Ulysses seem to the young women, as he drew near to themall naked as he was, for he was in great want. On seeing one sounkempt and so begrimed with salt water, the others scampered offalong the spits that jutted out into the sea, but the daughter ofAlcinous stood firm, for Minerva put courage into her heart and tookaway all fear from her. She stood right in front of Ulysses, and hedoubted whether he should go up to her, throw himself at her feet, andembrace her knees as a suppliant, or stay where he was and entreat herto give him some clothes and show him the way to the town. In theend he deemed it best to entreat her from a distance in case thegirl should take offence at his coming near enough to clasp her knees,so he addressed her in honeyed and persuasive language.
3.  Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."
4.  As they were thus talking, a dog that had been lying asleep raisedhis head and pricked up his ears. This was Argos, whom Ulysses hadbred before setting out for Troy, but he had never had any work out ofhim. In the old days he used to be taken out by the young men whenthey went hunting wild goats, or deer, or hares, but now that hismaster was gone he was lying neglected on the heaps of mule and cowdung that lay in front of the stable doors till the men should comeand draw it away to manure the great close; and he was full offleas. As soon as he saw Ulysses standing there, he dropped his earsand wagged his tail, but he could not get close up to his master. WhenUlysses saw the dog on the other side of the yard, dashed a tearfrom his eyes without Eumaeus seeing it, and said:
5.   Ulysses, therefore, went to Parnassus to get the presents fromAutolycus, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave himwelcome. His grandmother Amphithea threw her arms about him, andkissed his head, and both his beautiful eyes, while Autolycusdesired his sons to get dinner ready, and they did as he told them.They brought in a five year old bull, flayed it, made it ready anddivided it into joints; these they then cut carefully up intosmaller pieces and spitted them; they roasted them sufficiently andserved the portions round. Thus through the livelong day to thegoing down of the sun they feasted, and every man had his full shareso that all were satisfied; but when the sun set and it came ondark, they went to bed and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
6.  "When at last we got to the island where we had left the rest of ourships, we found our comrades lamenting us, and anxiously awaitingour return. We ran our vessel upon the sands and got out of her onto the sea shore; we also landed the Cyclops' sheep, and dividedthem equitably amongst us so that none might have reason tocomplain. As for the ram, my companions agreed that I should have itas an extra share; so I sacrificed it on the sea shore, and burned itsthigh bones to Jove, who is the lord of all. But he heeded not mysacrifice, and only thought how he might destroy my ships and mycomrades.

应用

1.  "Hence I was carried along for nine days till on the tenth night thegods stranded me on the Ogygian island, where dwells the great andpowerful goddess Calypso. She took me in and was kind to me, but Ineed say no more about this, for I told you and your noble wife allabout it yesterday, and I hate saying the same thing over and overagain."
2.  To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."
3.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."
4、  Then he threw his dirty old wallet, all tattered and torn, overhis shoulder with the cord by which it hung, and went back to sit downupon the threshold; but the suitors went within the cloisters,laughing and saluting him, "May Jove, and all the other gods," saidthey, 'grant you whatever you want for having put an end to theimportunity of this insatiable tramp. We will take him over to themainland presently, to king Echetus, who kills every one that comesnear him."
5、  On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeuscould not see him.

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网友评论(4myH527Q49477))

  • 蒋建明 08-02

      "'You dare-devil,' replied the goddess, you are always wanting tofight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beateneven by the immortals. For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she issavage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible. There is no help forit; your best chance will be to get by her as fast as ever you can,for if you dawdle about her rock while you are putting on your armour,she may catch you with a second cast of her six heads, and snap upanother half dozen of your men; so drive your ship past her at fullspeed, and roar out lustily to Crataiis who is Scylla's dam, badluck to her; she will then stop her from making a second raid uponyou.

  • 瞿弦和 08-02

      On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.

  • 甘道夫 08-02

       Thus said the suitors, but Antinous paid them no heed. MeanwhileTelemachus was furious about the blow that had been given to hisfather, and though no tear fell from him, he shook his head in silenceand brooded on his revenge.

  • 王玺玉 08-02

      THEN, when we had got down to the sea shore we drew our ship intothe water and got her mast and sails into her; we also put the sheepon board and took our places, weeping and in great distress of mind.Circe, that great and cunning goddess, sent us a fair wind that blewdead aft and stayed steadily with us keeping our sails all the timewell filled; so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear andlet her go as the wind and helmsman headed her. All day long her sailswere full as she held her course over the sea, but when the sun wentdown and darkness was over all the earth, we got into the deepwaters of the river Oceanus, where lie the land and city of theCimmerians who live enshrouded in mist and darkness which the raysof the sun never pierce neither at his rising nor as he goes downagain out of the heavens, but the poor wretches live in one longmelancholy night. When we got there we beached the ship, took thesheep out of her, and went along by the waters of Oceanus till we cameto the place of which Circe had told us.

  • 王青儿 08-01

    {  Euryclea did as she was told and closed the doors of the women'sapartments.

  • 彭所兴 07-31

      "Son of Atreus," it said, "we used to say that Jove had loved youbetter from first to last than any other hero, for you were captainover many and brave men, when we were all fighting together beforeTroy; yet the hand of death, which no mortal can escape, was laid uponyou all too early. Better for you had you fallen at Troy in thehey-day of your renown, for the Achaeans would have built a mound overyour ashes, and your son would have been heir to your good name,whereas it has now been your lot to come to a most miserable end."}

  • 徐志刚 07-31

      Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.

  • 吕浦 07-31

      And the ghost of Amphimedon answered, "Agamemnon, son of Atreus,king of men, I remember everything that you have said, and will tellyou fully and accurately about the way in which our end was broughtabout. Ulysses had been long gone, and we were courting his wife,who did not say point blank that she would not marry, nor yet bringmatters to an end, for she meant to compass our destruction: this,then, was the trick she played us. She set up a great tambour frame inher room and began to work on an enormous piece of fine needlework.'Sweethearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeed dead, still, do notpress me to marry again immediately; wait- for I would not have myskill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I have completed a pallfor the hero Laertes, against the time when death shall take him. Heis very rich, and the women of the place will talk if he is laid outwithout a pall.' This is what she said, and we assented; whereuponwe could see her working upon her great web all day long, but at nightshe would unpick the stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us inthis way for three years without our finding it out, but as timewore on and she was now in her fourth year, in the waning of moons andmany days had been accomplished, one of her maids who knew what shewas doing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work,so she had to finish it whether she would or no; and when she showedus the robe she had made, after she had had it washed, its splendourwas as that of the sun or moon.

  • 乌鲁木齐-郑州 07-30

       "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'

  • 黄辉冯 07-28

    {  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."

  • 王跃 07-28

      Minerva answered, "Never mind about him, I sent him that he might bewell spoken of for having gone. He is in no sort of difficulty, but isstaying quite comfortably with Menelaus, and is surrounded withabundance of every kind. The suitors have put out to sea and are lyingin wait for him, for they mean to kill him before he can get home. Ido not much think they will succeed, but rather that some of those whoare now eating up your estate will first find a grave themselves."

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