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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:洪智敏 大小:2sf8Z8dt15097KB 下载:bwR8dRhJ72920次
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日期:2020-08-09 23:42:28
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刑玉瑞

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Weeping and lamenting is now laid aside, and all hope in them of hislives restoring: onely to rid his body but of the house, that nowrequires their care and cunning: whereupon the Maide thus began.Mistresse (quoth she) this evening, although it was very late, atour next Neighbours doore (who you know is a joyner by his trade) Isaw a great Chest stand; and, as it seemeth, for a publike sale,because two or three nights together, it hath not bene thence removed:and if the owner have not lockt it, all invention else cannotfurnish us with the like helpe. For therein will we lay his body,whereon I will bestow two or three wounds with my Knife, and leavinghim so, our house can be no more suspected concerning his beinghere, then any other in the streete beside; nay rather farre lesse, inregard of your husbands credite and authority. Moreover, hereof I amcertaine, that he being of such bad and disordered qualities: itwill the more likely be imagined, that he was slaine by some of hisown loose companions, being with them about some pilfering busines,and afterward hid his body in the chest, it standing so fitly forthe purpose, and darke night also favouring the deed.
2.  By this time, the kindred and friends to the dead man (uppon noiseof his death bruited abroad) were likewise come to the Pallace, yea,most of the men and women dwelling in the Cittie, the bodie ofGabriello being laide in the midst of the Court, upon the whiteDamaske shrowd given by Andreana, with infinite Roses and othersweet Flowers lying theron: and such was the peoples love to him, thatnever was any mans death, more to be bemoaned and lamented. Beingdelivered out of the Court, it was carried to buriall, not like aBurgesse or ordinary Citizen, but with such pompe as beseemed a LordBaron, and on the shoulders of very noble Gentlemen, with greathonor and reverence.
3.  All the Starres were departed out of East, but onely that, whichcommonly cal bright Lucifer, the Day-Star, gracing the morning verygloriously: when the Master of the household, being risen, went withall the provision, to the Valley of Ladies, to make everie thing indue and decent readines, according as his Lord over-night hadcommanded him. After which departure of his, it was not long beforethe King arose, beeing awaked with the noise which the carriages made;and when he was up, the other two Gentlemen and the Ladies werequickly readie soone after.
4.  Hitherto I have lived with the losse of time, which yet (in somemeasure) may be releeved and recompenced: For, though Fortune weremine enemy in Mariage, by such a disproportion of our conditions:yet she may befriend in another nature, and kindely redeeme the injurydone me. Wherefore Lesca, to be as compleate in this case, as I amin all the rest beside; I have resolved upon a private Friend, and onemore worthy then any other, Namely, my Servant Pyrrhus, whose youthcarieth some correspondency with mine; and so constantly have I setledmy love to him, as I am not well, but when I thinke on him, or seehim: and (indeede) shall dye, except the sooner I may enjoy him. Andtherefore, if my life and well-fare be respected by thee, let himunderstand the integrity of mine affection, by such good means as thoufindest it most expedient to be done: entreating him from me, that Imay have some conference with him, when he shall thereto besolicited by me.
5.  By a fountaines side:
6.  Lisana being now in perfect health, the King consulted with hisQueene, what meete recompence he should gratifie her withall, forloving and affecting him in such fervent manner. Upon a daydetermined, the King mounting on horsebacke, accompanied with manyof his cheefest Lords and Barons, he rode to the Apothecaries house,where walking in his beautifull Garden, hee called for Bernardo andhis daughter Lisana. In the meane space, the Queene also came thither,Royally attended on by her Ladies, and Lisana being admitted intotheir company, they expressed themselves very gracious to her. Sooneafter, the King and the Queene cald Lisana, and the King spake in thismanner to her.

计划指导

1.  quoth Egano, Yes Wife, he came, but deerely to my cost: for heeverily taking me for thee, hath beaten me most extreamly, calling mean hundred Whores and Strumpets, reputing thee to bee the wickedstWoman living. In good sadnesse Beatrix, I wondred not a little at him,that he would give thee any such vile speeches, with intent to wrongmee in mine honour. Questionlesse, because hee saw thee to bejoviall spirited, gracious and affable towardes all men; therefore heeintended to make triall of thine honest carriage. Well Sir (saydeshee) twas happy that hee tempted mee with words, and let you tastethe proofe of them by deeds: and let him thinke, that I brooke thosewords as distastably, as you do or can, his ill deeds. But seeing heis so just, faithfull, and loyall to you, you may love him the better,and respect him as you finde occasion.
2.  Presently he tooke her by the hand, so led her forth of the poorehomely house, and in the presence of all his company, with his ownehands, he took off her meane wearing garments, smocke and all, andcloathed her with those Robes of State which he had purposelybrought thither for her, and plaiting her haire over her shoulders,hee placed a Crowne of gold on her head, whereat every one standing asamazed, and wondring not a little, hee said: Grizelda, wilt thouhave me to thy husband? Modestly blushing, and kneeling on the ground,she answered. Yes my gracious Lord, if you will accept so poore amaiden to be your wife. Yes Grizelda, quoth hee, with this holy kisse,I confirme thee for my wife; and so espoused her before them all. Thenmounting her on a milke-white Palfray, brought thither for her, sheewas thus honourably conducted to her Pallace.
3.  The woman perceiving that it was her husband that quarrelled, anddistinguishing the voyce of Adriano from his: knew presently whereshee was, and with whom; wherefore having wit at will, and desirous tocloude an error unadvisedly committed, and with no willing consentof her selfe: without returning any more words, presently she rose,and taking the Cradle with the child in it, removed it the to herdaughters bed side, although shee had no light to helpe her, andafterward went to bed to her, where (as if she were but newlyawaked) she called her Husband, to understand what angry speecheshad past betweene him and Panuccio. The Hoste replyed, saying. Didstthou not heare him wife, brag and boast, how he hath lyen this nightwith our daughter Nicholetta? Husband (quoth she) he is no honestGentleman; if hee should say so, and beleeve me it is a manifestlye, for I am in bed with her my selfe, and never yet closed mine eyestogether, since the first houre I laid me downe: it is unmannerly doneof him to speake it, and you are little lesse then a logger-head, ifyou doe beleeve it. This proceedeth from your bibbing and swillingyesternight, which (as it seemeth) maketh you to walke about the roomein your sleepe, dreaming of wonders in the night season: it were nogreat sinne if you brake your neck, to teach you keepe a fairerquarter; and how commeth it to passe, that Signior Panuccio couldnot keepe himselfe in his owne bed?
4.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED THAT GOOD MEN DOE SOMETIMES FALL INTO BAD
5.  The Woman having her eyes fixed on the ground, knew not well howshee should denie him; and yet in plaine words, to say shee consented,shee held it to be overbase and immodest, and ill agreeing with herformer reputation: when the Abbot had well noted this attention inher, and how silent shee stood without returning any answere; heaccounted the conquest to be more then halfe his owne: so thatcontinuing on his former perswasions, hee never ceased, but alluredher still to beleeve whatsoever he saide. And much ashamed of hisimportunity, but more of her owne flexible yeelding weaknesse, madeanswere, that shee would willingly accomplish his request; which yetshee did not absolutely grant, untill Ferando were first sent intoPurgatory. And till then (quoth the Abbot) I will not urge any more,because I purpose his speedy sending thither: but yet, so farre lendme your assistance, that either to morrow, or else the next day, hemay come hither once more to converse with me. So putting a faire goldRing on her finger, they parted till the next meeting.
6.  Of those delights, which kind contentment bring?

推荐功能

1.  When notice heereof was given to the Potestate, he arose; and sheebeing brought foorth into the Hall before him, he questioned with her,how and by what meanes this accident happened. Beside, he sent fordivers Physitians, to be informed by them, whether the Gentlemanwere poysoned, or otherwise murthered? All of them affirmed thecontrarie, avouching rather, that some Impostumation had engenderedneere his heart, which sodainly breaking, occasioned his as sodainedeath. The Potestate hearing this, and perceiving that Andreana waslittle or nothing at all faulty in the matter, her beauty and goodcarriage, kindled a vitlanous and lustful desire in him towards her,provoking him to the immodest motion, that upon granting hisrequest, he would release her. But when he saw, that all hisperswasions were to no purpose, hee sought to compasse his will byviolence; which like a vertuous and valiant Virago, shee worthilywithstood, defending her honour Nobly, and reprooving him with manyinjurious speeches, such as a lustfull Letcher Justlie deserved.
2.  When the feasting dayes were finished, the garments of sadmourning were quite laid aside, and those (becomming so generall ajoy) put on, to make their hearts and habites suteable. Now,concerning the man slaine, and supposed to be Theobaldo, hee wasone, that in all parts of body, and truenesse of complexion so neerelyresembled him, as Theobaldoes owne brethren could not distinguishthe one from the other: but hee was of Lunigiana, named Fatinolo,and not Theobaldo, whom the two Brethren Inne-keepers maliced, aboutsome idle suspition conceived, and having slaine him, layde his bodyat the doore of Aldobrandino, where by reason of Theobaldoesabsence, it was generally reputed to be hee, and Aldobrandinocharged to doe the deede, by vehement perswasion of the brethren,knowing what love had passed betweene him and his daughterHermelina. But happy was the Pilgrims returne, first to heare thosewords in the Inne, the meanes to bring the murther to light, andthen the discreet carriage of the Pilgrime, untill he plainly approvedhimselfe, to bee truely Theobaldo.
3.  Calandrino being very mistrustfull, scratched his head, yet felte heno grievance at all; and going still on; Buffalmaco sodainelyencountred him, upon his departure from Nello, and after salutationspassing betweene them; in a manner of admiration, demanded what heayled?
4.  When they had dined, to their own liking and contentment, they began(in continuation of their former order) to exercise divers dances, andafterward voyces to their instruments, and many pretty Madrigals andRoundelayes. Upon the finishing of these delights, the Queene gavethem leave to take their rest, when such as were so minded, went tosleep, others solaced themselves in the Garden. But after midday wasoverpast, they met (according to their wonted manner) and as theQueene had commanded, at the faire Fountaine; where she being placedin her seate royall, and casting her eye upon Pamphilus, she bad himbegin the dayes discourses, of happy successe in love, afterdisastrous and troublesome accidents; who yeelding thereto with humblereverence, thus began.
5.   Madam, I doe not remember, that ever I sustained any losse orhinderance by you, but rather so much good, as if I was worth anything, it proceeded from your great deservings, and by the servicein which I did stand engaged to you. But my present happinesse canno way be equalled, derived from your super-abounding gracious favour,and more then common course of kindnesse, vouchsafing (of your owneliberall nature) to come and visit so poore a servant. Oh that I hadas much to spend againe, as heretofore riotously I have runnethorow: what a welcome would your poore Host bestow upon you, forgracing; this homely house with your divine presence? With thesewordes, he conducted her into his house, and then into his simpleGarden, where having no convenient company for her, he said. Madam,the poverty of this place is such, that it affoordeth none fit foryour conversation: this poore woman, wife to an honest Husbandman willattend on you, while I (with some speede) shall make ready dinner.
6.  When he had ended these words, hee turned to Lisana, saying: Heeredoe I freely give over all further fruits of your affection towardsme, thanking you for your former love: so taking her head betweene hishands he kissed her faire forhead, which was the usuall custome inthose times. Perdicano, the Father and Mother of Lisana, and she herselfe likewise, extraordinarily joyfull for this so fortunate amarriage, returned humble and hearty thankes both to the King andQueene, and (as many credible Authors doe affirme) the King kept hispromise made to Lisana, because (so long as he lived) he alwalestermed himselfe by the name of her Knight, and in al actions ofChivalry by him undertaken, he never carried any other devise, butsuch as he received still from her.

应用

1.  Already had the bright Sunne renewed the day every where with hissplendant beames, and the Birds sate merrily singing on the bloomingbranches, yeelding testimony thereof to the eares of all hearers; whenthe seven Ladies, and the three Gentlemen (after they were risen)entered the Gardens, and there spent some time in walking, as alsomaking of Nose-gayes and Chaplets of Flowers. And even as they haddone the day before, so did they now follow the same course; for,after they had dined, in a coole and pleasing aire they fell todancing, and then went to sleepe a while, from which being awaked,they tooke their places (according as it pleased the Queene toappoint) in the same faire Meadow about her. And she, being a goodlycreature, and highly pleasing to behold, having put on her Crowne ofLawrell, and giving a gracious countenance to the whole company;commanded Madam Neiphila that her Tale should begin this daiesdelight. Whereupon she, without returning any excuse or deniall, beganin this manner.
2.  Not long since, there lived in the City of Trevers, an Almaine orGermaine, named Arriguo, who being a poore man, served as a Porter, orburden-bearer for money, when any man pleased to employ him. Andyet, notwithstanding his poore and meane condition, he was generallyreputed, to be of good and sanctified life. In which regard (whetherit were true or no, I know not) it happened, that when he died (atleast as the men of Trevers themselves affirmed) in the very instanthoure of his departing, all the Belles in the great Church of Trevers,(not being pulled by the helpe of any hand) beganne to ring: whichbeing accounted for a miracle, every one saide; that this Arriguohad bene, and was a Saint. And presently all the people of the Cityran to the house where the dead body lay, and carried it (as asanctified body) into the great Church, where people, halt, lame,and blind, or troubled with any other diseases, were brought about it,even as if every one should forth-with be holpen, onely by theirtouching the body.
3.  Honourable Ladies, if with advised judgement, we do duly considerthe order of all things, we shall very easily perceyve, That the wholeuniversall multiplicitie of Women, by Nature, custome, and lawes,are and ought to be subject to men, yea, and to be governd by theirdiscretion. Because every one desiring to enjoy peace, repose andcomfort with them, under whose charge they are; ought to be humble,patient and obedient, over and beside her spotlesse honesty, whichis the crowne and honour of every good woman. And although thoselawes, which respect the common good of all things, or rather useand custome (as our wonted saying is) the powers wherof are verygreat, and worthy to be reverenced, should not make us wise in thiscase. Yet Nature hath given us a sufficient demonstration, in creatingour bodies more soft and delicate, yea, and our hearts timorous,fearefull, benigne and compassionable, our strength feeble, our voycespleasing, and the motion of our members sweetly plyant: all whichare apparant testimonies, that wee have neede of others government.
4、  When the Captaine of the City (being a very wise and worthyGentleman) heard these tydings, and knowing that Giovanni, then hisprisoner, was the Son to Bernardino, and naturall Brother to the newlyrecovered Maide: he bethought himselfe, how best he might qualifie thefault committed by him. And entring into the Hall among them,handled the matter so discreetly, that a loving league of peace wasconfirmed betweene Giovanni and Menghino, to whom (with free andfull consent on all sides) the faire Maide, named Agatha, was given inmarriage, with a more honourable enlargement of her dowry, andGrinello, with the rest, delivered out of prison, which for theirtumultuous riot they had justly deserved. Menghino and Agatha hadtheir wedding worthily solemnized, with all due honours belongingthereto; and long time after they had lived in Faenza, highly beloved,and graciously esteemed.
5、  They were not bred to prey so base and low,

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网友评论(PdIeIU7D69644))

  • 刘绍 08-08

      IS, THE OCCASION OF MANY GREAT AND WORTHY COURTESIES

  • 戴安 08-08

      No sooner were the Tables withdrawne, and all risen: but they fetchta few turnings about the vally, because the Sunne was not (as yet)quite set. Then in the coole evening, according to the Queenesappointment: in a soft and gentle pace, they walked homeward: devisingon a thousand occasions, as well those which the dayes discourseshad yeelded, as others of their owne inventing beside. It was almostdarke night, before they arrived at the Pallace; where, with varietyof choice Wines, and abounding plenty of rare Banquetting, they outwore the little toile and wearinesse, which the long walke had chargedthem withall. Afterward, according to their wonted order, theInstruments being brought and played on, they fell to dancing aboutthe faire Fountaine; Tindaro intruding (now and then) the sound of hisBagpipe, to make the musicke seeme more melodious. But in the end, theQueene commanded Madame Philomena to sing; whereupon the Instrumentsbeing tuned fit for the purpose, thus she began.

  • 栗永 08-08

       Not long after, they finding the Citie, and behaviour of thepeople sufficiently pleasing to them; they resolved on theircontinuance heere, entering into a league of love and friendshippewith divers, never regarding, whether they were Gentlemen, or no, ordistinguishing the poore from the rich: but only in being conformeto their complexions, sociable and fit for friendship.

  • 庞峻 08-08

      So soone as I heard, that it was your gracious pleasure to dine withme, having regard to your excellency, and what (by merit) is justlydue unto you: I thought it a part of my bounden duty, to entertaineyou with such exquisite viands, as my poore power could any waycompasse, and farre beyond respect or welcome, to other common andordinary persons. Whereupon, remembring my Faulcon, which now you askefor; and her goodnesse, excelling all other of her kinde; Isupposed, that she would make a dainty dish for your dyet, andhaving drest her, so well as I could devise to do: you have fedheartily on her, and I am proud that I have so well bestowne her.But perceiving now, that you would have her for your sicke Sonne; itis no meane affliction to me, that I am disabled of yeelding youcontentment, which all my life time I have desired to doe.

  • 骆倩雯 08-07

    {  Her Chamber being on the streete side, and somewhat juttying overit, she observed the disposition of her Husband, that every night itwas long before he fell asleepe: but beeing once falne into it, nonoyse whatsoever, could easily wake him. This his solemne and soundsleeping, emboldned her so farre, as to meete with Roberto at thestreete doore, which (while her Husband slept) softly she would opento him, and therein private converse with him.

  • 王二妮 08-06

      You are to understand then, that Coppo di Borghese Domenichi, whowas of our owne City, and perhaps (as yet) his name remaineth in greatand reverend authority, now in these dayes of ours, as welldeserving eternall memory; yet more for his vertues and commendablequalities, then any boast of Nobility from his predecessors. This man,being well entred into yeares, and drawing towards the finishing ofhis dayes; it was his only delight and felicity, in conversation amonghis neighbours, to talke of matters concerning antiquity, and someother things within compasse of his owne knowledge: which he woulddeliver in such singular order (having an absolute memory) and withthe best Language, as very few or none could do the like. Among themultiplicity of his queint discourses, I remember he told us, thatsometime there lived in Florence a yong Gentleman, named Frederigo,Sonne to Signior Phillippo Alberigo, who was held and reputed, bothfor Armes, and all other actions beseeming a Gentleman, hardly to havehis equall through all Tuscany.}

  • 奇奥瓦 08-06

      But honourable Sir Roger, perceiving what delight his Children tookein the poore mans company; albeit he was offended at his Fathers harshwords, by holding his wife in such base respect: yet favoured thepoore Count so much the more, and seeing him weepe, did greatlycompassionate his case, saying to the poore man, that if he wouldaccept of his service, he willingly would entertaine him. Wheretothe Count replyed, that very gladly he would embrace his kindeoffer: but he was capeable of no other service, save onely to be anhorsekeeper, wherein he had imployed the most part of his time.Heereupon, more for pleasure and pitty then any necessity of hisservice, he was appointed to the keeping of an Horse, which wasonely for his Daughters saddle, and daily after he had done hisdiligence about the Horse, he did nothing else but play with thechildren. While Fortune pleased thus to dally with the poore CountD'Angiers, and his children, it came to passe, that the King of France(after divers leagues of truces passed betweene him and the Germaines)died, and next after him, his Son the Dolphin was crowned King, and itwas his wife that wrongfully caused the Counts banishment. Afterexpiration of the last league with the Germains, the warres began togrow much more fierce and sharpe, and the King of England, (uponrequest made to him by his new brother of France) sent him veryhonourable supplies of his people, under the conduct of Perotto, hislately elected President of Wales, and Sir Roger Mandevile, Son to hisother Lord high Marshall; with whom also the poore Count went, andcontinued a long while in the Campe as a common Souldier, where yetlike a valiant Gentleman (as indeed he was no lesse) both in adviceand actions; he accomplished many more notable matters, then wasexpected to come from him.

  • 罗德尼·金 08-06

      Among my other miseries and misfortunes, which hath halfe brokenmy heart in the meere repetition, beside the sad and afflictingsufferance; two things there are, which if I cannot compasse tohave, all hope is quite frustrate for ever, of gaining the grace of myLord and Husband. Yet these two things may I obtaine by your helpe, ifall be true which I have heard, and you can therein best resolvemee. Since my comming to this City, it hath credibly bene told me,that the Count my husband, is deeply in love with your daughter. Ifthe Count (quoth the Ladie) love my daughter, and have a wife of hisowne, he must thinke, and so shall surely finde it, that hisgreatnesse is no priviledge for him, whereby to worke dishonour uponher poverty. But indeede, some apparances there are, and such a matteras you speake of, may be so presumed; yet so farre from a very thoughtof entertaining in her or me; as whatsoever I am able to doe, to yeeldyou any comfort and content, you shall find me therein both willingand ready: for I prize my daughters spotlesse poverty at as high arate, as he can doe the pride of his honour.

  • 王颀 08-05

       Not long since, there lived in Naples, an honest meane man, whodid take to Wife, a fayre and lustie young Woman, being namedPeronella.-He professing the Trade of a Mason, and shee Carding andSpinning, maintained themselves in a reasonable condition, abating andabounding as their Fortunes served. It came to passe, that acertayne young man, well observing the beauty and good parts ofPeronella, became much addicted in affection towardes her: and byhis often and secret sollicitations, which he found not to beunkindely entertayned; his successe proved answerable to his hope,no unindifferencie appearing in their purposes, but where her estateseemed weakest, his supplies made an addition of more strength.

  • 孝勇 08-03

    {  The King was much amazed at so many strange accidents, and sendingfor Constance to come before him; from her owne mouth he heard thewhole relation of her continued affection to Martuccio, whereuponhee saide. Now trust me faire Damosell, thou hast dearely deserved himto be thy husband. Then sending for very costly Jewels, and richpresents, the one halfe of them he gave to her, and the other toMartuccio, graunting them license withall, to marry according to theirowne mindes.

  • 吕国栋 08-03

      Gracious Ladies, if I faile not in understanding your generallintention, we are purposely assembled heere to tell Tales; andespecially such as may please our selves. In which respect, becausenothing shold be done disorderly, I hold it lawfull for every one(as our Queene decreed before her Dignity) to relate such aNoveltie, as in their owne judgement may cause most contentment.Wherefore having heard that by the good admonitions of Jehannot deChevigny, Abraham the Jew was advised to the salvation of his soule,and Melchisedech (by his witty understanding) defended his riches fromthe traines of Saladine: I now purpose to tell you in a few plainewords, without feare of receiving any reprehension, how cunningly aMonke compassed his deliverance, from a punishment intended towardshim.

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