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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张群忠 大小:vUSeJM0147340KB 下载:58BPd2Cn81070次
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日期:2020-08-03 09:49:11
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唐纳德·莱维斯

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer. He then led theway to his own house, followed by his sons and sons-in-law. Whenthey had got there and had taken their places on the benches andseats, he mixed them a bowl of sweet wine that was eleven years oldwhen the housekeeper took the lid off the jar that held it. As hemixed the wine, he prayed much and made drink-offerings to Minerva,daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove. Then, when they had made theirdrink-offerings and had drunk each as much as he was minded, theothers went home to bed each in his own abode; but Nestor putTelemachus to sleep in the room that was over the gateway along withPisistratus, who was the only unmarried son now left him. As forhimself, he slept in an inner room of the house, with the queen hiswife by his side.
2.  "Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating upthe estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must notexpect others to think well of them. Why then should you mind if mentalk as you think they will? This stranger is strong and well-built,he says moreover that he is of noble birth. Give him the bow, andlet us see whether he can string it or no. I say- and it shallsurely be- that if Apollo vouchsafes him the glory of stringing it,I will give him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a javelin to keepoff dogs and robbers, and a sharp sword. I will also give him sandals,and will see him sent safely whereever he wants to go."
3.  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.
4.  While he was thus in two minds Helen came down from her high vaultedand perfumed room, looking as lovely as Diana herself. Adraste broughther a seat, Alcippe a soft woollen rug while Phylo fetched her thesilver work-box which Alcandra wife of Polybus had given her.Polybus lived in Egyptian Thebes, which is the richest city in thewhole world; he gave Menelaus two baths, both of pure silver, twotripods, and ten talents of gold; besides all this, his wife gaveHelen some beautiful presents, to wit, a golden distaff, and asilver work-box that ran on wheels, with a gold band round the topof it. Phylo now placed this by her side, full of fine spun yarn,and a distaff charged with violet coloured wool was laid upon thetop of it. Then Helen took her seat, put her feet upon thefootstool, and began to question her husband.
5.  "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."
6.  "First observe this scar," answered Ulysses, "which I got from aboar's tusk when I was hunting on Mount Parnassus. You and my motherhad sent me to Autolycus, my mother's father, to receive thepresents which when he was over here he had promised to give me.Furthermore I will point out to you the trees in the vineyard whichyou gave me, and I asked you all about them as I followed you roundthe garden. We went over them all, and you told me their names andwhat they all were. You gave me thirteen pear trees, ten appletrees, and forty fig trees; you also said you would give me fifty rowsof vines; there was corn planted between each row, and they yieldgrapes of every kind when the heat of heaven has been laid heavyupon them."

计划指导

1.  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."
2.  "Stockman, and you swineherd, I have something in my mind which I amin doubt whether to say or no; but I think I will say it. Whatmanner of men would you be to stand by Ulysses, if some god shouldbring him back here all of a sudden? Say which you are disposed to do-to side with the suitors, or with Ulysses?"
3.  Every one approved of this, and then they went home to bed each inhis own abode. When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn,appeared, they hurried down to the ship and brought their cauldronswith them. Alcinous went on board and saw everything so securelystowed under the ship's benches that nothing could break adrift andinjure the rowers. Then they went to the house of Alcinous to getdinner, and he sacrificed a bull for them in honour of Jove who is thelord of all. They set the steaks to grill and made an excellentdinner, after which the inspired bard, Demodocus, who was afavourite with every one, sang to them; but Ulysses kept on turninghis eyes towards the sun, as though to hasten his setting, for hewas longing to be on his way. As one who has been all day ploughinga fallow field with a couple of oxen keeps thinking about his supperand is glad when night comes that he may go and get it, for it isall his legs can do to carry him, even so did Ulysses rejoice when thesun went down, and he at once said to the Phaecians, addressinghimself more particularly to King Alcinous:
4.  "I will tell you the truth, my son," answered Euryclea. "There arefifty women in the house whom we teach to do things, such as cardingwool, and all kinds of household work. Of these, twelve in all havemisbehaved, and have been wanting in respect to me, and also toPenelope. They showed no disrespect to Telemachus, for he has onlylately grown and his mother never permitted him to give orders tothe female servants; but let me go upstairs and tell your wife allthat has happened, for some god has been sending her to sleep."
5.  And Menelaus answered, "Telemachus, if you insist on going I willnot detain you. not like to see a host either too fond of his guest ortoo rude to him. Moderation is best in all things, and not letting aman go when he wants to do so is as bad as telling him to go if hewould like to stay. One should treat a guest well as long as he isin the house and speed him when he wants to leave it. Wait, then, tillI can get your beautiful presents into your chariot, and till you haveyourself seen them. I will tell the women to prepare a sufficientdinner for you of what there may be in the house; it will be at oncemore proper and cheaper for you to get your dinner before settingout on such a long journey. If, moreover, you have a fancy formaking a tour in Hellas or in the Peloponnese, I will yoke myhorses, and will conduct you myself through all our principalcities. No one will send us away empty handed; every one will giveus something- a bronze tripod, a couple of mules, or a gold cup."
6.  To which Ulysses answered, "Good luck to you too my friend, andmay the gods grant you every happiness. I hope you will not miss thesword you have given me along with your apology."

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1.  "'Your brother and his ships escaped, for Juno protected him, butwhen he was just about to reach the high promontory of Malea, he wascaught by a heavy gale which carried him out to sea again sorelyagainst his will, and drove him to the foreland where Thyestes used todwell, but where Aegisthus was then living. By and by, however, itseemed as though he was to return safely after all, for the godsbacked the wind into its old quarter and they reached home; whereonAgamemnon kissed his native soil, and shed tears of joy at findinghimself in his own country.
2.  Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."
3.  THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."
4.  This made Minerva still more furious, so she scolded Ulysses veryangrily. "Ulysses," said she, "your strength and prowess are no longerwhat they were when you fought for nine long years among the Trojansabout the noble lady Helen. You killed many a man in those days, andit was through your stratagem that Priam's city was taken. How comesit that you are so lamentably less valiant now that you are on yourown ground, face to face with the suitors in your own house? Comeon, my good fellow, stand by my side and see how Mentor, son ofAlcinous shall fight your foes and requite your kindnesses conferredupon him."
5.   "'Keep still,' said he in a low voice, 'or the others will hearyou.' Then he raised his head on his elbow.
6.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs,or aiming with spears at a mark on the levelled ground in front of thehouse, and behaving with all their old insolence. But when it wasnow time for dinner, and the flock of sheep and goats had come intothe town from all the country round, with their shepherds as usual,then Medon, who was their favourite servant, and who waited uponthem at table, said, "Now then, my young masters, you have hadenough sport, so come inside that we may get dinner ready. Dinner isnot a bad thing, at dinner time."

应用

1.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said, and yoked thefleet horses to the chariot. The housekeeper packed them up aprovision of bread, wine, and sweetmeats fit for the sons ofprinces. Then Telemachus got into the chariot, while Pisistratusgathered up the reins and took his seat beside him. He lashed thehorses on and they flew forward nothing loth into the open country,leaving the high citadel of Pylos behind them. All that day did theytravel, swaying the yoke upon their necks till the sun went down anddarkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae where Diocleslived, who was son to Ortilochus and grandson to Alpheus. Here theypassed the night and Diocles entertained them hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn; appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and drove out through the gateway under the echoinggatehouse. Pisistratus lashed the horses on and they flew forwardnothing loth; presently they came to the corn lands Of the opencountry, and in the course of time completed their journey, so welldid their steeds take them.
2.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
3.  Here he ended, and the guests sat all of them enthralled andspeechless throughout the covered cloister. Then Arete said to them:
4、  "I wish it may prove so," answered Telemachus. "If it does, I willshow you so much good will and give you so many presents that allwho meet you will congratulate you."
5、  With these words he placed the double cup in the hands ofTelemachus, while Megapenthes brought the beautiful mixing-bowl andset it before him. Hard by stood lovely Helen with the robe ready inher hand.

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  • 凯迪拉克凯雷德 08-02

      So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."

  • 曲珍 08-02

      "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"

  • 阿布·瑞恩烈士 08-02

       "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.

  • 李元伟 08-02

      "There it was that I heard news of Ulysses, for the king told mehe had entertained him, and shown him much hospitality while he was onhis homeward journey. He showed me also the treasure of gold, andwrought iron that Ulysses had got together. There was enough to keephis family for ten generations, so much had he left in the house ofking Pheidon. But the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the god's high oak tree, and know whetherafter so long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly, or insecret. Moreover the king swore in my presence, making drink-offeringsin his own house as he did so, that the ship was by the water side,and the crew found, that should take him to his own country. He sentme off however before Ulysses returned, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,and he told those in charge of her to be sure and take me safely toKing Acastus.

  • 秦玉龙 08-01

    {  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. She took his shape,and went round the town to each one of the crew, telling them tomeet at the ship by sundown. She went also to Noemon son ofPhronius, and asked him to let her have a ship- which he was veryready to do. When the sun had set and darkness was over all theland, she got the ship into the water, put all the tackle on board herthat ships generally carry, and stationed her at the end of theharbour. Presently the crew came up, and the goddess spokeencouragingly to each of them.

  • 西蒙·柯克雷尔 07-31

      "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?}

  • 杜金存 07-31

      "I also saw Maera and Clymene and hateful Eriphyle, who sold her ownhusband for gold. But it would take me all night if I were to nameevery single one of the wives and daughters of heroes whom I saw,and it is time for me to go to bed, either on board ship with my crew,or here. As for my escort, heaven and yourselves will see to it."

  • 童方 07-31

      They all held their peace except King Alcinous, who began, "Sir,we have had much pleasure in hearing all that you have told us, fromwhich I understand that you are willing to show your prowess, ashaving been displeased with some insolent remarks that have beenmade to you by one of our athletes, and which could never have beenuttered by any one who knows how to talk with propriety. I hope youwill apprehend my meaning, and will explain to any be one of yourchief men who may be dining with yourself and your family when you gethome, that we have an hereditary aptitude for accomplishments of allkinds. We are not particularly remarkable for our boxing, nor yet aswrestlers, but we are singularly fleet of foot and are excellentsailors. We are extremely fond of good dinners, music, and dancing; wealso like frequent changes of linen, warm baths, and good beds, sonow, please, some of you who are the best dancers set about dancing,that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as sailors, runners, dancers,minstrels. Demodocus has left his lyre at my house, so run some one orother of you and fetch it for him."

  • 萧裕 07-30

       Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."

  • 杨素云 07-28

    {  BOOK III.

  • 陈治清 07-28

      But King Neptune, who was returning from the Ethiopians, caughtsight of Ulysses a long way off, from the mountains of the Solymi.He could see him sailing upon the sea, and it made him very angry,so he wagged his head and muttered to himself, saying, heavens, so thegods have been changing their minds about Ulysses while I was awayin Ethiopia, and now he is close to the land of the Phaeacians,where it is decreed that he shall escape from the calamities that havebefallen him. Still, he shall have plenty of hardship yet before hehas done with it."

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