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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:史蒂夫·科尔 大小:abgVf8lc96132KB 下载:pNlCbAjH69212次
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日期:2020-08-05 19:30:06
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Titus, if thou hadst not neede of comfort, as plainly I see thouhast, I would justly complaine of thee to my selfe, as of the manwho hath violated our friendship, in keeping thine extreamitie so longtime concealed from mee, which hath beene overtedious for thee toendure. And although it might seeme to thee a dishonest case, andtherefore kept from the knowledge of thy friend, yet I plainly tellthee, that dishonest courses (in the league of amitie) deserve no moreconcealment, then those of the honestest nature. But leaving theseimpertinent wandrings, let us come to them of much greater necessitie.
2.  Being come unto Geneway, he and his company boorded a Galley, and(in few dayes after) arrived at Acres, where they joyned themselveswith the Christian Army, wherein there happened a verie dangerousmortality: During which time of so sharpe visitation (the causeunknowne whence it proceeded) whether thorough the industrie, orrather the good Fortune of Saladine, well-neere all the rest of theChristians (which escaped death) were surprized his prisoner(without a blow strucken) and sundred and imprisoned in diversTownes and Citties. Amongest the which number of prisoners, it wasSignior Thorelloes chaunce to be one, and walked in bonds toAlexandria, where being unknowne, and fearing least he should bediscovered: constrained thereto meerly by necessity, hee shewedhimselfe in the condition of a Faulconer; wherein he was veryexcellently experienced, and by which means his profession was madeknowne to Saladine, hee delivered out of prison, and created theSoldans Faulconer.
3.  A jealous man, clouded with the habite of a Priest, became theConfessour to his owne Wife; who made him beleeve, that she wasdeepely in love with a Priest, which came every night, and lay withher. By meanes of which confession, while her jealous Husbandwatched the doore of his house; to surprize the Priest when he came:she that never meant to do amisse, had the company of a secret Friend,who came over the toppe of the house to visite her, while herfoolish Husband kept the doore.
4.  These words pierced the heart of the King deepely, and so much themore afflicted him, because he knew them to be most true: wherefore,after he had ventred a very vehement sigh, thus he replyed. Beleeve menoble Count, there is not any enemy, how strong soever he be, but Ihold him weake and easie to be vanquished, by him who is skilfull inthe warre, where a man may learne to conquere his owne appetite. Butbecause he shall find it a laborious taske, requiring inestimablestrength and courage; your words have so toucht me to the quicke, thatit becommeth me to let you effectually perceive (and within thecompasse of few dayes) that as I have learned to conquer others, soI am not ignorant, in expressing the like power upon my selfe.Having thus spoken, within some few dayes after, the King beingreturned to Naples, he determined, as we to free himself from anythe like ensuing follie, as also to recompence Signior Neri, for thegreat kindnesse he had shewne to him (although it was a difficultthing, to let another enjoy, what he rather desired for himselfe) tohave the two Damosels married, not as the Daughters of Signior Neri,but even as if they were his owne. And by consent of the Father, hegave Genevera the faire, to Signior Maffeo da Palizzi, and Isottathe amiable, to Signior Gulielmo della Magna, two Noble Knights andhonourable Barons. After he had thus given them in marriage, in sadmourning he departed thence into Apuglia, where by following worthyand honourable actions, he so well overcame all inordinateappetites: that shaking off the enthraling fetters of love, he livedfree from all passions, the rest of his life time, and dyed as anhonourable King.
5.  Wherefore, never be distrustfull of mee, but resolvedly buildeupon my courage. And in regard of my more honourable entertainment,I will then weare my Scarlet Gowne and Hood, wherein I receyved mygraduation; and then do both of you observe, what a rejoycing willbe among the whole company, at the entertaining of such a man as I am,enough to create me Captaine immediatly. You shall perceive also howthe case will go, after I have beene there but a while, in regard thatthe Countesse (having as yet never seene me) is so deepely enamored ofmee: she cannot choose but bestow the Bathe and Knighthood on me,which shee shall have the more honour of, in regard I am well ableto maintaine it, therefore referre all the rest to mee, and nevermisdoubt your injurie or mine.
6.  At these wordes the Pilgrime sighed, and then proceeded on againethus. Surely Madame, this one onely sin, may justly torment you,because I know for a certainty, that Theobaldo never offered you anyin many, the day hee first became enamoured of you; and what graceor favour you affoorded him, was your owne voluntary gift, and (ashe tooke it) no more then in modesty might well become you; for heeloving you first, you had beene most cruell and unkinde, if you shouldnot have requited him with the like affection. If then he continued sojust and loyall to you, as (of mine owne knowledge) I am able to sayhe did; what should move you to repulse him so rudely? Such mattersought well to bee considered on before hand; for if you did imagine,that you should repent it as an action ill done, yet you could not doeit, because as hee became yours, so were you likewise onely his; andhe being yours, you might dispose of him at your pleasure, as beingtruely obliged to none but you. How could you then with-draw yourselfe from him, being onely his, and not commit most manifest theft, afarre unfitting thing for you to doe, except you had gone with hisconsent.

计划指导

1.  So a good wife and bad wife, a wand will make stirre.
2.  Buffalmaco, Bruno, and the whole company, perceiving how hecontinued still his coughing and spetting, saide all with one voyce,That Calandrino was the Theefe to him selfe: and gave him manie grossespeeches beside, all departing home unto their houses, very muchdispleased and angry with him. After they were gone, none remainedwith him but the Priest, Bruno and Buffalmaco, who thus spake toCalandrino. I did ever thinke, that thou wast the theefe thy selfe,yet thou imputedst thy robbery to some other, for feare we should oncedrinke freely of thy purse, as thou hast done many times of ours.Calandrino, who had not yet ended his coughing and spetting, swaremany bitter Oathes, that his Brawne was stolne from him. Talke so longas thou wilt, quoth Buffalmaco, thy knavery is both knowne andseene, and well thou mayst be ashamed of thy selfe. Calandrino hearingthis, grew desperately angry; and to incense him more, Bruno thuspursued the matter.
3.  Wearisome is my life to me,
4.  Massetto, who was not far off from them all this while, but seemedseriously busied about sweeping and making cleane the Court, heard allthese speeches; and being not a little joyfull of them; said tohimselfe. If once I come to worke in your Garden, let the proofe yeeldpraise of my skill and knowledge. When the Fac-totum perceived, thathe knew perfectly how to undergo his businesse, and had questioned himby signes, concerning his willingnesse to serve there still, andreceived the like answere also, of his dutifull readinesse thereto; hegave him order to worke in the Garden, because the season did nowrequire it; and to leave all other affayres for the Monastery,attending now onely the Gardens preparation.
5.  The Husband of this Gentlewoman (albeit descended of a worthieFamily) was, neverthelesse, immeasurably covetous, and a verie harshnatured man. Which the Lord Marshall understanding, made such amadde composition with him, as to give him five hundred Ducates ofGold, on condition, that hee would let him lye one night with hiswife, not thinking him so base minded as to give consent. Which in agreedy avaritious humour he did, and the bargaine being absolutelyagreed on; the Lord Marshall prepared to fit him with a payment,such as it should be. He caused so many peeces of silver to becunningly guilded, as then went for currant mony in Florence, andcalled Popolines, and after he had lyen with the Lady (contrary to herwill and knowledge, her husband had so closely carried thebusinesse) the money was duely paid to the cornuted Coxcombe.Afterwards, this impudent shame chanced to be generally knowne,nothing remaining to the wilful Wittoll, but losse of his expectedgaine, and scorne in every place where he went. The Bishop likewise(beeing a discreete and sober man) would seeme to take no knowledgethereof; but bare out all scoffes with a well setled countenance.
6.  No sooner had she ended her devoute conjuring prayer, but shesaide to her husband: Now John, cough and spet: which John accordinglydid. And Frederigo, being all this while without, hearing her wittyconjuration of a Spirit, which he himselfe was supposed to be, beingridde of his former jealous suspition: in the middst of all hismelancholy, could very hardly refraine from laughing, the jestappeared so pleasing to him: But when John cought and spet, softlyhe said to himselfe: When next thou spetst, spet out all thy teeth.

推荐功能

1.  Except he come, some comfort to procure,
2.  After that Madam Eliza sate silent, the last charge and labour ofthe like employment, remained to the Queene her selfe; whereuponshee beganne thus to speake: Honest and vertuous young Ladies, like asthe Starres (when the Ayre is faire and cleere) are the adorning andbeauty of Heaven, and flowers (while the Spring time lasteth) doegraciously embellish the Meadowes; even so sweete speeches andpleasing conferences, to passe the time with commendable discourses,are the best habit of the minde, and an outward beauty to the body:which ornaments of words, when they appeare to be short and sweete,are much more seemely in women, then in men; because long andtedious talking (when it may be done in lesser time) is a greaterblemish in women, then in men.
3.  Calandrino stampt and fretted exceedingly, saying: As I am a trueman to God, my Prince, and Countrey, I tell thee truly, that my Brawneis stolne. Say so still I bid thee (answered Bruno) and let all theworld beleeve thee, if they list to do so, for I will not. Wouldstthou (quoth Calandrino) have me damne my selfe to the divell? I seethou dost not credit what I say: but would I were hanged by the necke,if it be not true, that my Brawne is stolne. How can it possible be,replyed Bruno? Did not I see it in thy house yesternight? Wouldst thouhave me beleeve, that it is flowne away? Although it is not flowneaway (quoth Calandrino) yet I am certain, that it is stolne away:for which I am weary of my life, because I dare not go home to mineowne house, in regard my wife will never beleeve it; and yet if sheshould credite it, we are sure to have no peace for a twelve monthsspace.
4.  It fortuned, that Pedro having no certaine knowledge of the way, butfollowing a trackt guiding too farre on the left hand; rode quiteout of course, and came at last within sight of a small Castle, out ofwhich (before they were aware) yssued twelve Villaines, whomAngelina sooner espyed, then Pedro could do; which made her cry out tohim, saying: Helpe deere Love to save us, or else we shall beassayled. Pedro then turning his horse so expeditiously as he could,and giving him the spurres as need required; mainly he galloppedinto a neere adjoyning Forrest, more minding the following ofAngelina, then any direction of way, or them that endeavoured to beehis hindrance. So that by often winding and turning about, as thepassage appeared troublesome to him, when he thought him selfe freeand furthest from them, he was round engirt, and seized on by them.When they had made him to dismount from his horse, questioning himof whence and what he was, and he resolving them therein, they fellinto a secret consultation, saying thus among themselves. This manis a friend to our deadly enemies, how can wee then otherwisedispose of him, but dreame him of all he hath, and in despight ofthe Orsini (men in nature hatefull to us) hang him up heere on oneof these Trees?
5.   I never felt oppressing paine,
6.  Can it be possible (quoth Helena) that you should be so benummedwith colde? Then I plainely perceive, that men can lye in their loveletters, which I can shew under your own hand, how you fryed inflames, and all for my love, and so have you written to me in everyletter. Poore credulous women are often thus deluded, in beleevingwhat men write and speake out of passion: but I will returne backeto my Brother, and make no doubt of dispatch, because I would gladlyhave your Company.

应用

1.  "I know well enough, that you held it as a desired benefit, Gisippusbeing a Native of your Citie, should also be linked to you byalliance: but I know no reason, why I should not be as neere and deereto you at Rome, as if I lived with you heere. Considering, when I amthere, you have a ready and well wishing friend, to stead you in allbeneficiall and serviceable offices, as carefull and provident foryour support, yea, a protectour of you and your affaires, as wellpublique as particular. Who is it then, not transported withpartiall affection, that can (in reason) more approve your act, thenthat which my friend Gisippus hath done? Questionlesse, not any one,as I thinke. Sophronia is married to Titus Quintus Fulvius, a NobleGentleman by antiquitie, a rich Citizen of Rome, and (which is aboveall) the friend of Gisippus: therfore, such a one as thinkes itstrange, is sorrie for it, or would not have it to be; knoweth notwhat he doth.
2.  The Scholler, who (onely to delight himselfe) maintained this longdiscoursing with her, returned her this answere. Madame, you did notrepose such confidence in me, for any good will or afrection in youtowards me, but in hope of recovering him whom you had lost; whereinyou merit not a jot of favour, but rather the more sharpe and severeinfliction. And whereas you inferre, that your over-rash credulity,gave the onely meanes to my revenge: Alas! therein you deceive yourselfe; for I have a thousand crochets working continually in my brain,whereby to entrap a wiser creature then a woman, yet veiled allunder the cunning cloake of love, but sauced with the bitter Wormewoodof hate. So that, had not this hapned as now it doth, of necessity youmust have falne into another: but, as it hath pleased my happy starsto favour mee therein, none could proove more to your eternallscandall and disgrace, then this of your owne devising; which I madechoise of, not in regard of any ease to you, but onely to content myselfe.
3.  Every one there present answered, that they were well contented bothto eate and drinke, and let the shame fall where it deserved;whereupon, Bruno appointing them how they should sit, and placingCalandrino as one among them: he began his counterfeite exorcisme,giving each man a Pill, and Buffalmaco a Cup of Wine after it. Butwhen he came to Calandrino, hee tooke one of them which was made ofthe Dogges dates or Dowsets, and delivering it into his hand,presently hee put it into his mouth and chewed it. So soone as histongue tasted the bitter Aloes, he began to coughe and spet extreamly,as being utterly unable, to endure the bitternesse and noysomesmell. The other men that had receyved the Pils, beganne to gaze oneupon another, to see whose behaviour should discover him; and Brunohaving not (as yet) delivered Pils to them all, proceeded on stillin his businesse, as seeming not to heare any coughing, till onebehinde him, saide. What meaneth Calandrino by this spetting andcoughing?
4、  She knowing what remained to bee done on her behalfe, drewsomewhat neere him, and shewed her selfe more familiar then formerlyshe had done: by which favourable meanes, he touched her with thecharmed Parchment, which was no sooner done; but with out using anyother kinde of language, hee went to the hay-Barne, whitherNicholletta followed him, and both being entred, he closed the Barnedoore, and then stood gazing on her, as if hee had never seene herbefore. Standing stil as in a study, or bethinking himselfe what heshould say: she began to use affable gesture to him, and taking him bythe hand, made shew as if shee meant to kisse him, which yet sherefrained, though he (rather then his life) would gladly have hadit. Why how now deare Calandrino (quoth she) jewell of my joy, comfortof my heart, how many times have I longed for thy sweet Company? Andenjoying it now, according to mine owne desire, dost thou stand like aStatue, or man alla morte? The rare tunes of the Gitterne, but (muchmore) the melodious accents of thy voyce, excelling Orpheus orAmphion, so ravished my soule, as I know not how to expresse the depthof mine affection; and yet hast thou brought me hither, onely to lookebabies in mine eyes, and not so much as speake one kinde word to me?
5、  Being aboord the Carrack, they had a Cabine and small bedconveniently allowed them, where they slept together, that theymight the better be reputed as man and wife; for, to passeotherwise, would have beene very dangerous to them both. Andquestionlesse, their faithfull promise made at Rhodes to Antiochus,sickenesse on the Sea, and mutuall respect they had of each otherscredit, was a constant restraint to all wanton desires, and a motiverather to incite Chastitie, then otherwise, and so (I hope) you areperswaded of them. But howsoever, the windes blewe merrily, theCarracke sayled lustily, and (by this time) they are arrived at Baffa,where the Cyprian Merchant dwelt, and where shee continued a longwhile with him, no one knowing otherwise, but that shee was his wifeindeede.Now it fortuned, that there arrived also at the same Baffa (aboutsome especiall occasions of his) a Gentleman whose name was Antigonus,well stept into yeeres, and better stored with wisedome then wealth:because by medling in many matters, while hee followed the serviceof the King of Cyprus, Fortune had beene very adverse to him. Thisancient Gentleman, passing (on a day) by the house where the Lady lay,and the Merchant being gone about his bussinesse into Armenia: heechanced to see the Lady at a window of the house, and because shee wasvery beautifull, he observed her the more advisedly, recollectinghis sences together, that (doubtlesse) he had seene her before, but inwhat place hee could not remember. The Lady her selfe likewise, whohad so long time beene Fortunes tennis ball, and the terme of her manymiseries drawing now neere an ending: began to conceive (upon the veryfirst sight of Antigonus) that she had formerly seene him inAlexandria, serving her Father in place of great degree. Heereupon,a sodaine hope perswaded her, that by the advice and furtherance ofthis Gentleman, shee should recover her wonted Royall condition: andopportunity now aptly fitting her, by the absence of her pretendedMerchant-husband, shee sent for him, requesting to have a few wordswith him.

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网友评论(oh4bHqKy13705))

  • 朱佳 08-04

      Worthy Ladies, it is a matter very manifest, that deceits do appeareso much the more pleasing, when (by the selfesame meanes) the subtledeceyver is artificially deceived. In which respect, though you allhave reported very singular deceits: yet I meane to tel you one,that may prove as pleasing to you, as any of your owne. And so muchthe rather, because the woman deceived, was a great and cunningMistris in beguiling others; equalling (if not excelling) any ofyour former beguilers.

  • 申贤俊 08-04

      To her my bondage is free liberty,

  • 乌尔鹏 08-04

       Nathan lovingly raised Mithridanes from the ground, then kissing hischeeke, and tenderly embracing him, he said. Sonne, thou needest notto aske, much less to obtaine pardon, for any enterprise of thine,which thou canst not yet terme to be good or bad: because thousoughtest not to bereave me of my life, for any hatred thou barest me,but onely in coveting to be reputed the Woorthier man. Take thenthis assurance of me, and beleeve it constantly, that there is noman living, whom I love and honour, as I do thee: considering thegreatnesse of thy minde, which consisteth not in the heaping up ofmoney, as wretched and miserable Worldlings make it their onelyfelicity; but, contending in bounty to spend what is thine, didst holdit for no shame to kil me, thereby to make thy selfe so much themore worthily famous.

  • 宋增慧 08-04

      In company of other Genewayes with him, he brought him to a newerected house of his, a building of great cost and beauty; where,after he had shewne him all the variable rarieties, he beganne thus.Master Guillaume, no doubt but you have heard and seene many things,and you can instruct me in some queint conceit or device, to be fairlyfigured in painting, at the entrance into the great Hall of myHouse. Master Guillaume hearing him speake so simply, returned himthis answer: Sir, I cannot advise you in any thing, so rare or unseeneas you talk of: but how to sneeze (after a new manner) upon a full andover-cloyed stomacke, to avoyde base humours that stupifie the braine,or other matters of the like quality. But if you would be taught agood one indeede, and had a disposition to see it fairely effected,I could instruct you in an excellent Emblem, wherwith (as yet) younever came acquainted.

  • 禹晓光 08-03

    {  Madam Philippa, being accused by her Husband Rinaldo de Pugliese,because he tooke her in Adulterie, with a yong Gentleman namedLazarino de Guazzagliotri: caused her to bee cited before the Judge.From whom she delivered her selfe, by a sodaine, witty, and pleasantanswer, and moderated a severe strict Statute, formerly made againstwomen.

  • 夏三秋 08-02

      After they had ridden some distance of ground, much moyled andbemyred with their shuffling jades, flinging the dirt every wayabout them, that well they might be termed two filthy companions:the raine gave over, and the evening looking somewhat cleare, theybegan to confer familiarly together. Messer Forese, riding a loftyFrench trot, everie step being ready to hoise him out of his saddle,hearing Giottos discreete answers to every ydle question he made(for indeede he was a very elegant speaker) began to peruse andsurveigh him, even from the foote to the head, as we use to say. Andperceiving him to be so greatly deformed, as no man could be worse, inhis opinion: without any consideration of his owne mishaping as bad,or rather more unsightly then hee; in a scoffing laughing humour,hee saide. Giotto, doest thou imagine, that a stranger, who hadnever seene thee before, and should now happen into our companie,would beleeve thee to bee the best Painter in the world, as indeedethou art? Presently Giotto (without any further meditation) returnedhim this answere. Signior Forese, I think he might then beleeve it,when (beholding you) hee could imagine that you had learned yourA. B. C. Which when Forese heard, he knew his owne error, and saw hispayment returned in such Coine, as he sold his Wares for.}

  • 麦弗逊 08-02

      Mother (quoth he) if you can do so much for me, as that I may haveFrederigoes Faulcon, I am perswaded, that my sicknesse soone willcease. The Lady hearing this, sate some short while musing to herselfe, and began to consider, what she might best doe to compasseher Sonnes desire: for well she knew, how long a time Frederigo hadmost lovingly kept it, not suffering it ever to be out of his sight.Moreover, shee remembred, how earnest in affection he had bene to her,never thinking himselfe happy, but onely when he was in her company;wherefore, shee entred into this private consultation with her ownethoughts. Shall I send, or goe my selfe in person, to request theFaulcon of him, it being the best that ever flew? It is his onelyJewell of delight, and that taken from him, no longer can he wish tolive in this World. How farre then voyde of understanding shall I shewmy selfe, to rob a Gentleman of his sole felicity, having no other joyor comfort left him? These and the like considerations, wheeledabout her troubled braine, onely in tender care and love to her Sonne,perswading her selfe assuredly, that the Faulcon were her owne, if shewould but request it: yet not knowing whereon it were best to resolve,shee returned no answer to her Sonne, but sate still in her silentmeditations. At the length, love to the youth, so prevailed withher, that she concluded on his contentation, and (come of it whatcould) shee would not send for it; but go her selfe in person torequest it, and then returne home againe with it: whereupon thus shespake. Sonne, comfort thy selfe, and let languishing thoughts nolonger offend thee: for here I promise thee, that the first thing I doto morrow morning, shall bee my journey for the Faulcon, and assurethy selfe, that I will bring it with me. Whereat the youth was sojoyed, that he imagined, his sicknesse began instantly a little toleave him, and promised him a speedy recovery.

  • 杨成 08-02

      There dwelt sometime in Florence, one who was generally called bythe name of Guiotto, a man being the greatest Gourmand, and grossestfeeder, as ever was seene in any Countrey, all his meanes andprocurements meerly unable to maintaine expences for filling hisbelly. But otherwise he was of sufficient and commendable carriage,fairely demeaned, and well- discoursing on any argument: yet, not as acurious and spruce Courtier, but rather a frequenter of rich mensTables, where choice of good cheere is sildome wanting, and suchshould have his company, albeit not invited, yet (like a boldintruder) he had the courage to bid himselfe welcome.

  • 戴德 08-01

       Madam Eliza having ended her Tale, and heard what commendationsthe whole company gave thereof; the Queene commanded Philostratus,to tell a Novell agreeing with his owne minde, smiling thereat, thusreplyed. Faire Ladies, I have bene so often checkt and snapt, for myyesterdayes matter and argument of discoursing, which was both tediousand offensive to you; that if I intended to make you any amends, Ishould now undertake to tell such a Tale, as might put you into amirthfull humour. Which I am determined to do, in relating a briefeand pleasant Novell, not any way offensive (as I trust) butexemplary for some good notes of observation.

  • 梁婷 07-30

    {  Pyrrhus, who had often considered on Lescaes first message,concluded with himselfe; that if any more she moved the same matter:hee would returne her another kinde of answere, wholly yeelding tocontent his Lady; provided, that he might remaine assured,concerning the intyre truth of the motion, and that it was not urgedonely to trie him, wherefore, thus he replyed. Lesca, do not imaginemee so ignorant, as not to know the certaintie of all thy formerallegations, confessing them as freely as thou doest, or canst. Butyet let mee tell thee withall, that I knowe my Lord to be wise andjudicious, and having committed all his affaires to my care and trust:never blame mee to misdoubt, least my Ladie (by his counsell andadvice) make thee the messenger of this motion, therby to call myFidelitie in question.

  • 何亮 07-30

      While thus he went about, considering on all these things veryrespectively, he saw the Maister of the Abbots Houshold (becausethen it was the houre of dinner) command water to be brought forwashing hands, so everie one sitting down at the Tatle, it fell to thelot of Primasso, to sit directly against the doore, whereat theAbbot must enter into the Hall. The custome in this Court was such,that no manner of Foode should be served to any of the Table, untillsuch time as the Lord Abbot was himselfe set: whereupon, every thingbeing fit and ready, the Master of the Houshold went to tell his Lord,that nothing now wanted but his onely presence.

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