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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:金家凤 大小:vxsrQrnU33452KB 下载:rDnpBk0D10463次
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日期:2020-08-10 08:48:58
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  DECEIVING OTHERS, DO WELL DESERVE TO BE DECEIVED THEMSELVES
2.  Having taken her sad and sorrowfull farewell of them all,accompanied onely with her Maide, and one of her Kinsmen, away shewent, attired in a Pilgrimes habit, yet well furnished with moneyand precious jewels, to avoyde all wants which might: befall her intravaile; not acquainting any one whether she went. In no place stayedshe, untill she was arrived at Florence, where happening into apoore Widdowes house, like a poore Pilgrime, she seemed well contentedtherewith. And desiring to heare some tydings of the Count, the nextday shee saw him passe by the house on horse-backe, with hiscompany. Now, albeit shee knew him well enough, yet shee demanded ofthe good old Widdow, what Gentleman he was? She made answer, that hewas a stranger there, yet a Nobleman, called Count Bertrand ofRoussillion, a very courteous Knight, beloved and much respected inthe City. Moreover, that he was farre in love with a neighbour ofhers, a young Gentlewoman, but very poore and meane in substance,yet of honest life, vertuous, and never taxed with any evill report:onely her poverty was the maine imbarment of her marriage, dwelling inhouse with her mother, who was a wise, honest, and worthy Lady.
3.  His blood boyling with rage and distemper, by such a monstrousinjurie offered him; he wrapt his night-mantle about out and leavinghis Chamber, imagining, that whatsoever he was, needs he must be oneof his owne house: he tooke a light in his hand, and convayed itinto a little Lanthorne, purposing to be resolved in his suspition. Noguests or strangers were now in his Court, but onely such asbelonged to his houshold, who lodged altogether about the Escurieand Stables, being there appointed to divers beds. Now, this was hisconceite, that whosoever had beene so lately familiar with the Queene,his heart and his pulse could (as yet) be hardly at rest, but ratherwould be troubled with apparant agitation, as discovering the guilt ofso great an offender. Many Chambers had he passed thorow, where allwere soundly sleeping, and yet he felt both their brests and pulses.
4.  So that Frederigo departed thence, both with the losse of his labourand supper. But a neighbour of mine, who is a woman of good yeares,told me, that both the one and other were true, as she her selfeheard, when she was a little Girle. And concerning the latteraccident, it was not to John of Lorrayne, but to another, named Johnde Nello, that dwelt at S. Peters Gate, and of the same professionas John of Lorrayne was. Wherefore (faire Ladies) it remaineth in yourowne choice, to entertain which of the two prayers you please, or bothtogether if you will: for they are of extraordinary vertue in suchstrange occurrences, as you have heeretofore heard, and (upon doubt)may prove by experience. It shall not therefore be amisse for you,to learne them both by hart, for (peradventure) they may stand youin good sted, if ever you chance to have the like occasion.
5.  He happening (on a day) to meete him in the Church of Saint John,and seeing him seriously busied, in beholding the rare pictures, andthe curious carved Tabernacle, which (not long before) was placed onthe. high Altar in the said Church: considered with himselfe, thathe had now fit place and opportunity, to effect what hee had long timedesired. And having imparted his minde to a very intimate friend,how he intended to deale with simple Calandrino: they went both veryneere him, where he sate all alone, and making shew as if they saw himnot; began to consult between themselves, concerning the rareproperties of precious stones; whereof Maso discoursed as exactly,as he had beene a most skilfull Lapidarie; to which conference oftheirs, Calandrino lent an attentive eare, in regard it was matterof singular rarity.
6.  "I will prove it so sufficiently," says he, that you shall all bethoroughly convinced. Gentlemen," says he, "by how much a family ismost ancient by so much it is most noble. The family of the Baronchiis the most ancient in Florence, ergo it is the most noble. I havenothing, then, to prove but the antiquity of the Baronchi. This willappear in that Prometheus made them at the time that he first began tolearn to paint, and made others after he was master of his art. Toconvince you of this, do but examine the figures of the one and theother: you'll find art and proportion in the composition of the one,whereas the others are but rough-drawn and imperfect. Among theBaronchi you'll meet with one with a long narrow face, another witha prodigiously broad one; one is flat-nosed, another has a nose thatmeasures an ell; one has a long chin and jaws like an ass, another hashis short and flat, and is monkey-faced. Nay, there are some of themthat have but one eye either larger or lower than the others have.In a word, their faces for all the world resemble such as childrenmake when they first begin to draw. Prometheus, you will allow, mustbe no great master when he made these figures, as I told you before;and consequently they must be more noble as they are more ancient."

计划指导

1.  Let me advise
2.  THE EIGHT DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
3.  PASSE, UNDER THE COUNTERFEIT CLOAKE OF RELIGION
4.  With patience Madam I endured all before, but now (me thinkes) heproceedeth too farre, which is not any way to be suffered; andtherefore I intended to let you know it, that you may perceive, howwel you are rewarded for the faithfull and loyall love you bearehim, and for which, I was even at deaths dore. Now, because you may bethe surer of my speeches, not to be any lyes or fables, and that youmay (if you please) approve the truth by your owne experience, Icaused my wife to send him word, that she would meet him to morrowat the Bathing-house appointed, about the houre of noone-day, whenpeople repose themselves in regard of the heates violence; withwhich answer the woman returned very jocondly. Let me now tell youLady, I hope you have better opinion of my wit, then any meaning inme, to send my wife thither; I rather did it to this end, thathaving acquainted you with his treacherous intent, you should supplymy wives place, by saving both his reputation and your owne, andfrustrating his unkind purpose to me. Moreover, upon the view of hisowne delusion, wrought by my wife in meere love to you, he shall seehis foule shame, and your most noble care, to keepe the rites ofmarriage betweene you still unstained.
5.  When the next foode was sent to Ferando, so much of the powder wasmingled with the wine, as would serve onely for foure houresentrauncing, in which time, they clothed him in his owne wearingapparell againe, the Abbot himselfe in person, and his honest trustyMonke of Bologna, conveying and laying him in the same vault under theTombe, where at the first they gave him buriall. The next morningfollowing, the breake of day, Ferando recovered his senses, and thorowdivers chinkes and crannies of the Tombe, descried daylight, which heehad not see in tenne moneths space before. Perceiving then plainely,that he was alive, he cryed out aloude, saying: Open, open, and letmee forth of Purgatory, for I have beene heere long enough inconscience. Thrusting up his head against the cover of the Tombe,which was not of any great strength, neither well closed together; heeput it quite off the Tombe, and so got forth upon his feete: atwhich instant time, the Monks having ended their morning Mattins,and hearing the noyse, ran in hast thither, and knowing the voyce ofFerando, saw that he was come forth of the Monument.
6.  In good sadnesse Sir, I am not able to remember and tell you (withinthe compasse of a thousand yeares) what, and how manie severall kindesof Musicall Instruments, were continually played on before us; whatmultiplicity of Waxe lights burned in all partes of the roomes;neither the excessive store of rich Drugs, Marchpanes, Comfites, andrare Banquetting stuffe, consumed there at one Feasting, wherein therewanted no bounty of the best and purest wines. Nor do I (MasterDoctor) repute you so weakly witted, as to think, that in the timeof our being thus assembled there, any of us al were cloathed insuch simple and meane Garments, as ordinarily are worne in the streetson mens bodies, or any so silly as the verie best you have: No Sir,not any one man among us, but appeared by his apparrell, equall to thegreatest Emperour on the earth, his robe most sumptuouslyimbroidered with precious stones, Pearles, and Carbuncles, as theworld affoordeth not the like. But above all the rest, the delightsand pleasures there, are beyond my capacity to expresse, or(indeede) any comparison: as namely, store of goodly and beautifullwomen, brought thither from all parts of the world; alwayesprovided, if men bee desirous of their company: but for your easiercomprehension, I will make some briefe relation of them to you,according as I heard them there named.

推荐功能

1.  My thoughts did speake, for thoughts be alwayes free,
2.  Afterward, they waited on her into the Hall againe, being their trueSoveraigne Lady and Mistresse, as she was no lesse in her poorestGarments; where all rejoycing for the new restored Mother, and happyrecovery of so noble a son and daughter, the Festivall continuedmany months after. Now every one thought the Marquesse to be a nobleand wise Prince, though somewhat sharpe and unsufferable, in thesevere experiences made of his wife: but (above al) they reputedGrizelda, to be a most wise, patient, and vertuous Lady. The Countof Panago, within few daies after returned backe to Bologna; and theLord Marques, fetching home old Janiculo from his country drudgery, tolive with him (as his Father in law) in his Princely Palace, gavehim honorable maintenance, wherein hee long continued, and ended hisdaies. Afterward, he matched his daughter in a Noble marriage: heand Grizelda living a long time together, in the highest honor thatpossibly could be.
3.  Alas good man, like an armed Watchman, thou satst at thine ownedoore all a cold Winters night, perswading mee (poorelly credulouswoman) that, upon urgent occasions, thou must needs suppe and lodgefrom home. Remember thy selfe therefore better heereafter, become atrue understanding man, as thou shouldst bee, and make not thy selfe amocking stocke to them, who knoweth thy jealous qualities, as wellas I do, and be not so watchfull over me, as thou art. For I sweare bymy true honesty, that if I were but as willing, as thou artsuspitious: I could deceive thee, if thou hadst an hundred eyes, asNature affords thee but two, and have my pleasures freely, yet thou benot a jot the wiser, or my credit any way impaired.
4.  When shee had heard this whole discourse, then shee perceived,that other Women were subject to the like infirmitie, and as wisefor themselves, as shee could be, though these the like sinisteraccidents might sometime crosse them: and gladly shee wished, thatHerculanoes Wives excuse, might now serve to acquite her: butbecause in blaming others errours, our owne may sometime chance toescape discovery, and cleare us, albeit wee are as guilty; in a sharpereprehending manner, thus shee began. See Husband, heere is hansomebehaviour, of an holy faire-seeming, and Saint-like woman, to whom Idurst have confest my sinnes, I conceived such a religiousperswasion of her lives integrety, free from the least scruple oftaxation. A woman, so farre stept into yeeres, as shee is, to givesuch an evill example to younger women, is it not a sinne beyond allsufferance? Accursed be the houre, when she was borne into this World,and her selfe likewise, to bee so lewdly and incontinently given; anuniversall shame and slaunder, to all the good women of our City.
5.   Pedro perceiving, that the way was shut up, whereby (and none other)he was to mount the Ladder of his hopes; began to wax weary oflonger living: and if he could have won her fathers consent, hewould have maried her in the despight of all his friends.Neverthelesse, he had a conceit hammering in his head, which if themaid would bee as forward as himselfe, should bring the matter to fulleffect. Letters and secret intelligences passing still betweene, atlength he understood her ready resolution, to adventure with himthorough all fortunes whatsoever, concluding on their sodaine andsecret flight from Rome. For which Pedro did so well provide, thatvery early in a morning, and well mounted on horsebacke, they tookethe way leading unto Alagna, where Pedro had some honest friends, inwhom he reposed especiall trust. Riding on thus thorow the countrey,having no leysure to accomplish their marriage, because they stoodin feare of pursuite: they were ridden above foure leagues fromRome, still shortning the way with their amorous discoursing.
6.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, HOW EASILY A PLAINE AND SIMPLE MAN MAY BE

应用

1.  Thus the idle and loose love of Restagnone, with the frantickerage and jealousie of Ninetta and Folco, overturned all their longcontinued happinesse, and threw a disastrous ending on them all.
2.  About some three or foure nights after, Meucio being fast asleepe inhis bed, the ghoste of Tingoccio appeared to him, and called soloude that Meucio awaking, demanded who called him? I am thy friendTingoccio, replied the ghoste, who according to my former promisemade, am come again in vision to thee, to tell thee tidings out of thenether world. Meucio was a while somewhat amazed: but, recollectinghis more manly spirits together, boldly he said. My brother andfriend, thou art heartily welcome: but I thought thou hadst beeneutterly lost. Those things (quoth Tingoccio) are lost, which cannot berecovered againe, and if I were lost, how could I then be heere withthee? Alas Tingoccio, replyed Meucio, my meaning is not so: but Iwould be resolved, whether thou art among the damned soules, in thepainefull fire of hell torments, or no? No (quoth Tingoccio) I amnot sent thither, but for divers sinnes by mee committed I am tosuffer very great and grievous paines. Then Meucio demaundedparticularly, the punishments inflicted there, for the severall sinnescommitted heere: Wherein Tingoccio fully resolved him. And uponfurther question, what hee would have to be done for him here, madeanswere, That Meucio should cause Masses, Prayers and Almes-deeds tobe performed for him, which (he said) were very helpefull to thesoules abiding there, and Meucio promised to see them done.
3.  In the Spring season,
4、  By this time the gentle blast of Zephirus began to blow, because theSunne grew neere his setting, wherewith the King concluded his Novell,and none remaining more to be thus imployed: taking the Crowne fromoff his owne head, he placed it on Madame Laurettaes, saying,Madame, I Crowne you with your owne Crowne, as Queene of ourCompany. You shall henceforth command as Lady and Mistresse, in suchoccasions as shall be to your liking, and for the contentment of usall; With which words he set him downe. And Madame Lauretta beingnow created Queene, shee caused the Master of the houshold to beecalled, to whom she gave command, that the Tables should be prepared nthe pleasant vally, but at a more convenient houre, then formerlyhad beene, because they might (with better ease) returne backe tothe Pallace. Then shee tooke order likewise, for all such othernecessary matters, as should bee required in the time of f Regiment:and then turning her selfe to the whole Company, she began in thismanner.
5、  Moreover, in some apt and convenient place of thy house, theremust be a forge or furnace erected, framed in decent and formallfashion, and neere it a large table placed, ordered in such sort, asstanding upright on feete, and leaning the reines of thy backe againstit; thou must stande stedfastly in that manner every night, withoutthe least motion or stirring, untill the breake of day appeareth,and thine eyes still uppon the Furnace fixed, to keepe ever in memory,the true order which I have prescribed. So soone as the morning isseene, thou mayest (if thou wilt) walke, or rest a little upon thybed, and afterward go about thy businesse, if thou have any. Then goto dinner, attending readily till the evenings approch, preparing suchthings as I will readily set thee downe in writing, without whichthere is not any thing to bee done; and then returne to the same taskeagaine, not varying a jot from the course directed. Before the time befully expired, thou shalt perceive many apparant signes, that thestone is still in absolute forwardnesse, but it will bee utterlylost if thou fayle in the least of all the observances. And when theexperience hath crowned thy labour, thou art sure to have thePhilosophers stone, and thereby shalt be able to enrich all, and workewonders beside.

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网友评论(oyCe9TQX51141))

  • 张建华 08-09

      The Abbot causing Miserere to be devoutly sung, sprinkling Ferandowell with Holy-water, and placing a lighted Taper in his hand, senthim home so to his owne dwelling Village: where when the Neighboursbeheld him, as people halfe frighted out of their wits, they fled awayfrom him, so scared and terrified, as if they had seene some dreadfullsight, or gastly apporition; his wife being as fearfull of him, as anyof the rest. He called to them kindly by their severall names, tellingthem, that he was newly risen out of his grave, and was a man as hehad bin before. Then they began to touch and feele him, growing intomore certaine assurance of him, perceiving him to be a living manindeede: whereupon they demanded many questions of him; and id as ifhe were become farre wiser then before, told them tydings, fromtheir long deceased Kindred and Friends, as if he had met with themall in Purgatory, reporting a thousand lyes and fables to them,which (neverthelesse) they beleeved.

  • 杜世忠 08-09

      The Physitian interrupting him bashfully, turned himselfe untoBruno, saying. Did not I tell thee this before? Observe what a notablething it is, to speake well, and to frequent the company of theWise. A thousand other, meerely blockes and dullardes by Nature, couldnever so soone comprehend all the particularities of my knowledge,as this honest and apprehensive man hath done. Thou didst not searchinto it halfe so soone, nor (indeed) did I expresse a quarter of myingenuity to thee, as (since his comming) hath prodigally flownefrom me.

  • 魏庆杜 08-09

       FORTUNE, THEN IN ANY REGARD OF THEIR DUTIFULL SERVICES

  • 迟浩田 08-09

      Now, for their securer meeting, to stand cleare from all matter ofscandal or detection, they concluded in this order between themselves.Lazaro, for so was Peronellaes Husband named, being an earely riserevery morning, either to seeke for worke, or to effect it beingundertaken: this amorous friend being therewith acquainted, andstanding in some such convenient place, where hee could see Lazaroesdeparture from his house, and yet himselfe no way discerned; pooreLazaro was no sooner gone, but presently he enters the house, whichstood in a verie solitarie street, called the Avorio. Many morningshad they thus met together, to their no meane delight andcontentation, till one especial morning among the rest, when Lazarowas gone forth to worke, and Striguario (so was the amorous youngman named) visiting Peronella in the house: upon a verie urgentoccasion, Lazaro returned backe againe, quite contrary to his formerwont, keeping foorth all day, and never comming home till night.

  • 郭建军 08-08

    {  The Ladies sighed verie often, hearing the variety of wofullmiseries happening to Alathiella: but who knoweth, what occasionmooved them to those sighes? Perhappes there were some among them, whorather sighed they could not be so often maried as she was, ratherthen for any other compassion they had of her disasters. But leavingthat to their owne construction, they smiled merrily at the lastspeeches of Pamphilus: and the Queene perceyving the Novell to beended, shee fixed her eye upon Madame Eliza, as signifying thereby,that she was next to succeed in order; which shee joyfullyembracing, spake as followeth. The field is very large and spacious,wherein all this day we have walked, and there is not any one hereso wearied with running the former races, but nimbly would adventureon as many more, so copious are the alterations of Fortune, in sadrepetition of her wonderfull changes: and among the infinity of hervarious courses, I must make addition of another, which I trust,will no way discontent you.

  • 吴建民 08-07

      Here I am to tell you, that in the Campe or Army of theChristians, on the day when Saladine made his surprizal, there was aProvinciall Gentleman dead and buried, who was Signior Thorello deDignes, a man of very honourable and great esteeme, in which respect(Signior Thorello d'Istria, knowne throughout the Army, by hisNobility and valour) whosoever heard that Signior Thorello was dead:beleeved it to be Thorello d'Istria, and not he of Dignes, so thatThorello d'Istriaes unknowne surprizall and thraldome, made it also topasse for an assured truth.}

  • 亚努科维奇 08-07

      But still live in controule.

  • 吕向蕙 08-07

      A modest yong maiden named Lagina, following the same profession,and being an intimate familiar friend, Simonida tooke along in hercompany, and came to the Garden appointed by Pasquino; where she foundhim readily expecting her comming, and another friend also with him,called Puccino (albeit more usually tearmed Strambo) a secretwell-willer to Lagina, whose love became the more furthered by hisfriendly meeting. Each Lover delighting in his hearts chosenMistresse, caused them to walke alone by themselves, as thespaciousnesse of the Garden gave them ample liberty: Puccino withhis Lagina in one part, and Pasquino with his Simonida in another. Thewalke which they had made choise of, was by a long and goodly bed ofSage, turning and returning by the same bed their conference ministredoccasion, and as they pleased to recreate themselves, affecting ratherto continue still there, then in any part of the Garden.

  • 桂香 08-06

       THE SECOND DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

  • 潘逸阳 08-04

    {  Nothing wanted now, but a convenient company to assist him, andthe order how to have it done. Then he remembred Chynon and hisfriends, whom he detained as his prisoners, and perswaded himselfe,that he could not have a more faithfull friend in such a busines, thenChynon was. Hereupon, the night following, he sent for him into hisChamber, and being alone by themselves, thus he began. Chynon (quothhe) as the Gods are very bountifull, in bestowing their blessings onmen, so do they therein most wisely make proofe of their vertues,and such as they finde firme and constant, in all occurrences whichmay happen, then they make worthy (as valiant spirits) of t verybest and highest merites. Now, they being willing to have more certainexperience of thy vertues, then those which heretofore thou hastshewne, within the bounds and limits of thy fathers possessions, whichI know to be superabounding: perhaps do intend to present thee otheroccasions, of more important weight and consequence.

  • 张春浩 08-04

      Guion di Procida, being found familiarly conversing with a youngDamosell, which he loved; and had beene given (formerly) to Frederigo,King of Sicilie: was bound to a stake, to be consumed with fire.From which h dan ger (neverthelesse) he escaped, being knowne by DonRogiero de Oria, Lord Admirall of Sicilie, and afterward married theDamosell.

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