0 威尼斯人新用户注册-APP安装下载

威尼斯人新用户注册 注册最新版下载

威尼斯人新用户注册 注册

威尼斯人新用户注册注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:屈浩伟 大小:Nzj6qmaL14739KB 下载:9FEWkCmL37840次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:h4wjfGSk49520条
日期:2020-08-05 10:52:39
安卓
福特

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."
2.  So saying she lashed the mules with her whip and they left theriver. The mules drew well and their hoofs went up and down upon theroad. She was careful not to go too fast for Ulysses and the maids whowere following on foot along with the waggon, so she plied her whipwith judgement. As the sun was going down they came to the sacredgrove of Minerva, and there Ulysses sat down and prayed to themighty daughter of Jove.
3.  "Antinous, insolent and wicked schemer, they say you are the bestspeaker and counsellor of any man your own age in Ithaca, but youare nothing of the kind. Madman, why should you try to compass thedeath of Telemachus, and take no heed of suppliants, whose witnessis Jove himself? It is not right for you to plot thus against oneanother. Do you not remember how your father fled to this house infear of the people, who were enraged against him for having gonewith some Taphian pirates and plundered the Thesprotians who were atpeace with us? They wanted to tear him in pieces and eat up everythinghe had, but Ulysses stayed their hands although they wereinfuriated, and now you devour his property without paying for it, andbreak my heart by his wooing his wife and trying to kill his son.Leave off doing so, and stop the others also."
4.  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.
5.  "They sang these words most musically, and as I longed to hearthem further I made by frowning to my men that they should set mefree; but they quickened their stroke, and Eurylochus and Perimedesbound me with still stronger bonds till we had got out of hearing ofthe Sirens' voices. Then my men took the wax from their ears andunbound me.
6.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.

计划指导

1.  The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."
2.  "You shall go to bed as soon as you please," replied Penelope,"now that the gods have sent you home to your own good house and toyour country. But as heaven has put it in your mind to speak of it,tell me about the task that lies before you. I shall have to hearabout it later, so it is better that I should be told at once."
3.  "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."
4.  "We agreed to do as she had said, and feasted through the livelongday to the going down of the sun, but when the sun had set and it cameon dark, the men laid themselves down to sleep by the stern cablesof the ship. Then Circe took me by the hand and bade me be seated awayfrom the others, while she reclined by my side and asked me allabout our adventures.
5.  "'I will do so gladly,' answered she, 'if you men will first swearme a solemn oath that you will do me no harm by the way.'
6.  "Alas," said he to himself, "what kind of people have I comeamongst? Are they cruel, savage, and uncivilized, or hospitable andhumane? I seem to hear the voices of young women, and they soundlike those of the nymphs that haunt mountain tops, or springs ofrivers and meadows of green grass. At any rate I am among a race ofmen and women. Let me try if I cannot manage to get a look at them."

推荐功能

1.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'
2.  Then spoke the aged hero Echeneus who was one of the oldest menamong them, "My friends," said he, "what our august queen has justsaid to us is both reasonable and to the purpose, therefore bepersuaded by it; but the decision whether in word or deed restsultimately with King Alcinous."
3.  "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.
4.  "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun wefeasted our fill on meat and drink, but when the sun went down andit came on dark, we camped upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I bade my men on board andloose the hawsers. Then they took their places and smote the greysea with their oars; so we sailed on with sorrow in our hearts, butglad to have escaped death though we had lost our comrades.
5.   Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."
6.  "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."

应用

1.  "You are asleep, Penelope: the gods who live at ease will not sufferyou to weep and be so sad. Your son has done them no wrong, so he willyet come back to you."
2.  Then Penelope's heart sank within her, and for a long time she wasspeechless; her eyes filled with tears, and she could find noutterance. At last, however, she said, "Why did my son leave me?What business had he to go sailing off in ships that make long voyagesover the ocean like sea-horses? Does he want to die without leavingany one behind him to keep up his name?"
3.  "I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him,and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, whenI saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him asplausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell ityou; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name isNoman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have alwayscalled me.'
4、  "Good heavens, this voyage of Telemachus is a very serious matter;we had made sure that it would come to nothing, but the young fellowhas got away in spite of us, and with a picked crew too. He will begiving us trouble presently; may Jove take him before he is fullgrown. Find me a ship, therefore, with a crew of twenty men, and Iwill lie in wait for him in the straits between Ithaca and Samos; hewill then rue the day that he set out to try and get news of hisfather."
5、  "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(ifvs7vl326774))

  • 张培莉 08-04

      "I stayed with Calypso seven years straight on end, and wateredthe good clothes she gave me with my tears during the whole time;but at last when the eighth year came round she bade me depart ofher own free will, either because Jove had told her she must, orbecause she had changed her mind. She sent me from her island on araft, which she provisioned with abundance of bread and wine. Moreovershe gave me good stout clothing, and sent me a wind that blew bothwarm and fair. Days seven and ten did I sail over the sea, and onthe eighteenth I caught sight of the first outlines of the mountainsupon your coast- and glad indeed was I to set eyes upon them.Nevertheless there was still much trouble in store for me, for at thispoint Neptune would let me go no further, and raised a great stormagainst me; the sea was so terribly high that I could no longer keepto my raft, which went to pieces under the fury of the gale, and I hadto swim for it, till wind and current brought me to your shores.

  • 胡泳 08-04

      "When we reached the harbour we found it land-locked under steepcliffs, with a narrow entrance between two headlands. My captains tookall their ships inside, and made them fast close to one another, forthere was never so much as a breath of wind inside, but it wasalways dead calm. I kept my own ship outside, and moored it to arock at the very end of the point; then I climbed a high rock toreconnoitre, but could see no sign neither of man nor cattle, onlysome smoke rising from the ground. So I sent two of my company with anattendant to find out what sort of people the inhabitants were.

  • 许淑华 08-04

       "I wish, child," answered Euryclea, "that you would take themanagement of the house into your own hands altogether, and look afterall the property yourself. But who is to go with you and light youto the store room? The maids would have so, but you would not letthem.

  • 白芙蓉 08-04

      "Leiodes, what are you talking about? Your words are monstrous andintolerable; it makes me angry to listen to you. Shall, then, this bowtake the life of many a chief among us, merely because you cannot bendit yourself? True, you were not born to be an archer, but there areothers who will soon string it."

  • 罗伯特·李 08-03

    {  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captive. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with horsemen and foot soldiers and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them. Jove, however, put it in my mind to do thus- and Iwish I had died then and there in Egypt instead, for there was muchsorrow in store for me- I took off my helmet and shield and dropped myspear from my hand; then I went straight up to the king's chariot,clasped his knees and kissed them, whereon he spared my life, bademe get into his chariot, and took me weeping to his own home. Manymade at me with their ashen spears and tried to kil me in theirfury, but the king protected me, for he feared the wrath of Jove theprotector of strangers, who punishes those who do evil.

  • 阿西木 08-02

      "'That,' said he, 'I can soon do Any ghost that you let taste of theblood will talk with you like a reasonable being, but if you do notlet them have any blood they will go away again.'}

  • 池杨 08-02

      "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.

  • 叶青纯 08-02

      Then Amphinomus drew his sword and made straight at Ulysses to tryand get him away from the door; but Telemachus was too quick forhim, and struck him from behind; the spear caught him between theshoulders and went right through his chest, so that he fell heavily tothe ground and struck the earth with his forehead. Then Telemachussprang away from him, leaving his spear still in the body, for hefeared that if he stayed to draw it out, some one of the Achaeansmight come up and hack at him with his sword, or knock him down, so heset off at a run, and immediately was at his father's side. Then hesaid:

  • 白建群 08-01

       So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had gotsafely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return tohis wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had gothim into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by,there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back toIthaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, histroubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun topity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasingand would not let him get home.

  • 李爱 07-30

    {  The suitors bit their lips as they heard him, and marvelled at theboldness of his speech. Then, Antinous, son of Eupeithes, said, "Thegods seem to have given you lessons in bluster and tall talking; mayJove never grant you to be chief in Ithaca as your father was beforeyou."

  • 庄孜 07-30

      "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"

提交评论