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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:柯某静 大小:Lp9BiV7p58963KB 下载:8x9Tyaj338075次
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日期:2020-08-10 09:02:46
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Where Beauties eye should make the deepest scarre.
2.  Neiphila cried out: "Mark this, Philostratus; in trying to teachus you might have had such a lesson as Masetto di Lamporechio had ofthe nuns, and recovered your speech just as your bare bones hadlearned to whistle without a master." Finding himself thus evenlymatched, Philostratus ceased his pleasantries; and beginning toconsider on the charge committed to his care, called the Master of thehoushold, to know in what estate all matters were, because where anydefect appeared, every thing might be the sooner remedied, for thebetter satisfaction of the company, during the time of hisauthority. Then returning backe to the assembly, thus he began. LovelyLadies, I would have you to know, that since the time of ability inme, to distinguish betweene good and evill, I have alwayes benesubject (perhaps by the meanes of some beauty heere among us) to theproud and imperious dominion of love, with expression of all duty,humility, and most intimate desire to please yet all hath prooved tono purpose, but still I have bin rejected for some other, whereby mycondition hath falne from ill to worse, and so still it is likely,even to the houre: of my death. In which respect, it best pleaseth me,that our conferences to morrow, shall extend to no other argument, bitonly such cases as are most conformable to my calamity, namely ofsuch, whose love hath had unhappy ending, because I await no otherissue of mine; nor willingly would I be called by any other name,but only, the miserable and unfortunate Lover.
3.  No sooner were they arrived, but Pasimondo, the intended Husband forIphigenia (who had already heard the tydings) went and complained tothe Senate, who appointed a Gentleman of Rhodes named Lysimachus,and being that yeere soveraigne Magistrate over the Rhodians, to gowell provided for the apprehension of Chynon and his company,committing them to prison, which accordingly was done. In this manner,the poore unfortunate lover Chynon, lost his faire Iphigenia, havingwon her in so short a while before, and scarsely requited with so muchas a kisse. But as for Iphigenia, she was royally welcommed by manyLords and Ladies of Rhodes, who so kindely comforted her, that shesoone forgotte all her greefe and trouble on the Sea, remaining incompany of those Ladies and Gentlewomen, untill the day determined forher marriage.
4.  A LIVELY DEMONSTRATION, THAT THE BEAUTY OF A WOMAN (OFTENTIMES)
5.  Some of them were ancient Signiors of the house, and yet but meereNovices (as all the rest were) in these cunning and politiquestratagems of the Lord Abbot, when hee intended to punish any one inPurgatory: and therefore, being affrighted, and amazed at this rareaccident; they fled away from him, running to the Abbot, who makinga shew to them, as if he were but new come forth of his Oratory, ina kinde of pacifying speeches, saide; Peace my deare Sonnes, be notaffraide, but fetch the Crosse and Holy-water hither; then followme, and I will shew you, what miracles the Fates have pleased toshew in our Convent, therefore be silent, and make no more noise;all which was performed according to his command.
6.  At such time as was prefixed for the purpose, counterfeit Letterscame to the Marquesse (as sent from Rome) which he caused to bepublikely read in the hearing of his subjects: that the Pope haddispensed with him, to leave Grizelda, and marry with another Wife,wherefore sending for her immediatly, in presence of them all, thus hespake to her. Woman, by concession sent me from the Pope, he hathdispensed with me, to make choyce of another Wife, and to free myselfe from thee. And because my predecessors have beene Noblemen,and great Lords in this Country, thou being the daughter of a pooreCountrey Clowne, and their blood and mine notoriously imbased, by mymarriage with thee: I intend to have thee no longer my Wife, butwill returne thee home to thy Fathers house, with all the rich Dowrythou broughtest me; and then I wil take another Wife, with whom I amalready contracted, better beseeming my birth, and farre morecontenting and pleasing to my people.

计划指导

1.  When I was yong, I entred first thy fights,
2.  When the King perceyved that Madame Pampinea had ended herdiscourse, he sat sadly a pretty while, without uttering one word, butafterward spake thus. Little goodnesse appeared in the beginning ofthis Novell, because it ministred occasion of mirth; yet the endingproved better, and I could wish, that worse inflictions had falne onthe venerious Friar. Then turning towards Madam Lauretta, he said;Lady, do you tell us a better tale, if possible it may be. Shesmiling, thus answered the King: Sir, you are over-cruelly bentagainst poore Lovers, in desiring, that their amourous processionsshould have harsh and sinister concludings. Neverthelesse, inobedience to your severe command, among three persons amourouslyperplexed, I will relate an unhappy ending; whereas all may be saideto speede as unfortunately, being equally alike, in enjoying the issueof their desires, and thus I purpose to proceed.
3.  Come lovely Nymphes, lend hands mine eyes to close,
4.  Be it nere so little:
5.  Now for your better understanding the quality of the place, and whatensued thereupon, it is not unnecessary to describe it, according to acommon use, observed in those parts. There was a narrow passage orentrie, as often we see reserved betweene two houses, for eithersbenefit to such a needfull place; and boards loosely lay upon thejoynts, which such as were acquainted withall, could easily avoide anyperille in passing to or from the stoole. But our so newly createdBrother, not dreaming to find a Queane to his Sister, receiving sofoule a fall into the vault, and knowing not how to helpe himselfe,being sorrowfull beyond measure; cryed out to the boy for light andaide, who intended not to give him any. For the crafty wag, (a meeteattendant for so honest a Mistresse) no sooner heard him to be fallen,but presently he ran to enforme her thereof, and shee as speedilyreturned to the Chamber, where finding his cloathes under the bedshead, shee needed no instruction for search of his pockets. But havingfound the gold, which Andrea indiscreetely carried alwayes abouthim, as thinking it could no where else be so safe: This was allshee aymed at, and for which shee had ensnared him, faigning her selfeto be of Palermo, and Daughter to Piero of Perouse, so that notregarding him any longer, but making fast the house of Office doore,there she left him in that miserable taking.Poore Andrea perceiving, that his calles could get no answere fromthe Lad; cryed out louder, but all to no purpose: when seeing into hisowne simplicity, and understanding his error, though somewhat toolate, hee made such meanes constrainedly, that he got over a wall,which severed that foule sinke from the Worlds eye; and being in theopen streete, went to the doore of the House, which then he knew toowell to his cost, making loud exclaimes with rapping and knocking, butall as fruitelesse as before. Sorrowing exceedingly, and manifestlybeholding his misfortune; Alas (quoth he) how soone have I lost aSister, and five hundred Crownes besides? With many other words,loud calles, and beatings uppon the doore without intermission, theneighbours finding themselves disturbed, and unable to endure any suchceaselesse vexation, rose from their beddes, and called to him,desiring him to be gone, and let them rest. A Maide also of the samehouse, looking forth at the window, and seeming as newly raised fromsleepe, called to him, saying; What noyse is that beneath? WhyVirgin (answered Andrea) know you not me? I am Andrea de Piero,Brother to your Mistresse Fiordeliza. Thou art a drunken knave replyedthe Maide, more full of drinke then wit: goe sleepe, goe sleepe, andcome againe to morrow: for I know no Andrea de Piero, neither hathmy Mistresse any such Brother. Get thee gone go ie good man, andsuffer us to sleepe I prythee. How now (quoth Andrea) doest thou notunderstand what I say? Thou knowest that I supt with thy Mistressethis night; but if our Sicilian kindred be so soone forgot, Iprythee give mee my Cloathes which I left in my Chamber, and thenverie gladly will I get mee gone. Hereat the Maide laughing outaloude, saide; Surely the man is mad, or walketh the streetes in adreame: and so clasping fast the Window, away she went and left him.Now could Andrea assure himselfe, that his Golde and cloathes werepast recovery, which mooving him to the mor impatience, his formerintercessions became converted into furie, and what hee could notcompasse by faire intreats, he intended to winne by outrage andviolence: so that taking up a great stone in his hand, hee layedupon the doore verie powerfull strokes. The neighbors hearing thismollestation still, admitting them not the least respite of rest,reputed him for a troublesome fellow, and that he used thosecounterfet words, onely to disturbe the Mistresse of the house, andall that dwelled neere about her; looking againe out at theirwindowes, they altogether beganne to rate and reprove him, even likeso many bawling Curres, barking at a strange dog passing through thestreet. This is shamefull villany (quoth one) and not to besuffered, that honest women should thus be molested in their houses,with foolish idle words, and at such an unseasonable time of thenight. For Gods sake (good man) be gone, and let us sleepe; if thouhave any thing to say to the Gentlewoman of the house, come tomorrowin the daytime, and no doubt but she will make thee sufficient answer.
6.  THE THIRD DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL

推荐功能

1.  Admit (myracle of Ladies) that I should die in this distresse: Alas,my death would be but your dishonour; I cannot be termed mine ownemurtherer, when the Dart came from your eye that did it, and mustremaine a witnes of your rigor. You cannot then chuse but call tominde, and say within your own soule: Alas, what a sinne have Icommitted, in being so unmercifull to my Magnifico. Repentance thenserves to no purpose, but you must answer for such unkinde cruelty.Wherefore, to prevent so blacke a scandall to your bright beauty,beside the ceaselesse acclamations, which will dog your walkes inthe day time, and breake your quiet sleepes in the night season,with fearefull sights and gastly apparitions, hovering and hauntingabout your bed; let all these moove you to milde mercy, and spillnot life, when you may save it.
2.  Bruno, seeming as if he were more then halfe sorrowfull, yetsupporting still his former jesting humor, saide: Now trust meeCalandrino, if it be so; they that did it are much too blame. If it beso? answered Calandrino, Belike thou wouldst have mee blasphemeHeaven, and all the Saints therein: I tell thee once againe Bruno,that this last night my Brawne was stolne. Be patient good Calandrino,replyed Buffalmaco, and if thy Brawne be stolne from thee, there aremeans enow to get it againe. Meanes enow to get it againe? saidCalandrino, I would faine heare one likely one, and let all the restgo by. I am sure Calandrino, answered Buffalmaco, thou art verilyperswaded, that no Theefe came from India, to steale thy Brawne fromthee: in which respect, it must needes then be some of thy Neighbours:whom if thou couldst lovingly assemble together, I knowe an experimentto be made with Bread and Cheese, whereby the party that hath it, willquickly be discovered.
3.  A Monke having committed an offence, deserving to be very greevouslypunished, freed himselfe from the paine to be inflicted on him, bywittily reprehending his Abbot, with the very same fault.
4.  It chanced on a day, that Alessandro rode somewhat neere to theAbbot, who stedfastly beholding him, perceived that he was a verycomely young man, so affable, lovely, and gracious, that even inthis first encounter, he had never seene any man before that betterpleased him. Calling him a little closer, he began to conferrefamiliarly with him, demanding what he was, whence he came, andwhether he travelled. Alessandro imparted freely to him all hisaffaires, in every thing satisfying his demands, and offering(although his power was small) to doe him all the service he could.
5.   Enricht with beautie, farre beyond all other:
6.  The reward for a precedent wrong committed, which Zeppa retortedupon Spinelloccio, was answerable to his desert, and no more thenequity required, in which respect, I am of opinion, that such menought not to be over-sharpely reproved, as do injurie to him, whoseeketh for it, and justly should have it, althogh Madam Pampinea (notlong since) avouched the contrary.

应用

1.  It is not unknowne to you, partly by intelligence from ourreverend predecessours, as also some understanding of your owne,that many time have resorted to our City of Florence, Potestates andOfficers, belonging to the Marquesate of Anconia; who commonly weremen of lowe spirit, and their lives so wretched and penurious, as theyrather deserved to be tearmed Misers, then men. And in regard ofthis their naturall covetousnesse and misery, the Judges would bringalso in their company, such Scribes or Notaries, as being paraleldewith their Masters: they all seemed like Swaines come from the Plough,or bred up in some Coblers quality, rather then Schollers, or Studentsof Law.
2.  Unto the place, which made me first to mourne.
3.  Wherefore, never be distrustfull of mee, but resolvedly buildeupon my courage. And in regard of my more honourable entertainment,I will then weare my Scarlet Gowne and Hood, wherein I receyved mygraduation; and then do both of you observe, what a rejoycing willbe among the whole company, at the entertaining of such a man as I am,enough to create me Captaine immediatly. You shall perceive also howthe case will go, after I have beene there but a while, in regard thatthe Countesse (having as yet never seene me) is so deepely enamored ofmee: she cannot choose but bestow the Bathe and Knighthood on me,which shee shall have the more honour of, in regard I am well ableto maintaine it, therefore referre all the rest to mee, and nevermisdoubt your injurie or mine.
4、  Now trust me Daughter, thy case is to be pittied, and so much therather, because thou art in the flowre and spring time of thy youth,when not a minute of time is to bee left: for there is no greater anerrour in this life, then the losse of time, because it cannot beerecovered againe; and when the fiends themselves affright us, yet ifwee keepe our embers still covered with warme ashes on the hearth,they have not any power to hurt us. If any one can truly speakethereof, then I am able to deliver true testimony; for I know, but notwithout much perturbation of minde, and piercing afflictions in thespirit; how much time I lost without any profit. And yet I lost notall, for I would not have thee thinke me to bee so foolish, that I didaltogether neglect such an especiall benefit; which when I call tomind, and consider now in what condition I am, thou must imagine, itis no small hearts griefe to mee, that age should make me utterlydespised, and no fire affoorded to light my tinder.
5、  Mithridanes sat an indifferent while meditating with his thoghtsbefore ie would returne any answer: but at the last, concluding torepose confidence in him (in regard of his pretended discontentment)with many circumstantial perswasions, first for fidelity, next forconstancie, and lastly for counsell and assistance, he declared to himtruly what he was, the cause of his comming thither, and the reasonurging him thereto. Nathan hearing these words, and the detestabledeliberation of Mithridanes, became quite changed in himself: yetwisely making no outward appearance thereof, with a bold courage andsetled countenance, thus he replyed.

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网友评论(1nbZ2mkj18513))

  • 胡为真 08-09

      If any man having in his house a good and faithfull servant, whofalling into extremity of sickenesse, shall be throwne forth intothe open street, without any care or pitty taken on him: A strangerchanceth to passe by, and (moved with compassion of his weakenesse)carryeth him home to his owne house, where using all charitable andnot sparing any cost, he recovereth the sicke person to his formerhealth. I now desire to know, if keeping the said restored person, andimploying him about his owne businesse: the first Master (bypretending his first right) may lawfully complaine of the second,and yeeld him backe againe to the first master, albeit he doe makechallenge of him?

  • 沙孜 08-09

      CHECKING THE ARROGANT PRIDE OF VAINE-HEADED WOMEN

  • 瓜迪奥拉 08-09

       Now by this meanes, he grew great in the grace of King Pedro, whoreplanted him in all the goods and honours which he had before, withverie high and eminent authority. Hereunto the Ambassador added,that hee was entertayned with extraordinary grace, and delivery ofpublike joy and exaltation, when his Wife and Sonne were knowne tobe living, of whom no tydings had at any time bene heard, since thehoure of his surprizall. Moreover, that a swift winged Bark was nowsent thither (upon the happy hearing of this newes) well furnishedwith noble Gentlemen, to attend till their returning backe. We needeto make no doubt concerning the tydings brought by this Ambassadour,nor of the Gentlemens welcome, thus sent to Madame Beritola andGeoffrey; who before they would sit downe at the Table, saluted MesserConrado and his kinde Lady (on the behalfe of Henriet) for all thegreat graces extended to her and her Sonne, with promise of any thing,lying in the power of Henriet, to rest continually at their command.The like they did to Signior Gasparino (whose liberall favours cameunlooked for) with certaine assurance, that when Henriet shouldunderstand what he had done for his other Sonne, the Poore expelled,there would be no defaylance of reciprocall courtesies.

  • 郭剑周 08-09

      Within a short while after, he drew neere the Campe belonging to theKing of Cappadocia, where boldly he gave him battell; chancing thereinto be slaine, his Army broken and discomfited, by meanes whereof,the King of Cappadocia remaining Conquerour, marched on towardesLajazzo, every one yeelding him obeysance all the way as he went. Inthe meane space, the servant to Osbech, who was named Antiochus, andwith whom the faire Ladie was left in guard; although hee was aged,yet seeing shee was so extraordinarily beautifull, he fell in lovewith her, forgetting the solemne vowes he had made to his master.One happinesse he had in this case to helpe him, namely, that heunderstood and could speake her Language: a matter of no meane comfortto her, who constrainedly had lived divers yeeres together, in thestate of a deafe or dumbe Woman, because every where else theyunderstoode her not, nor shee them, but by shewes and signes.

  • 刘珊珊 08-08

    {  LEARNING AND IGNORANCE, UPON JUDICIOUS APPREHENSION

  • 曹寅 08-07

      BEHALFE OF LOVE-SICKE LISANA}

  • 阳光之城·拉萨 08-07

      "I cannot count unto you, how many there have beene, who (againstthe will of their Fathers) have made choice of their husbands; northem that have fled away with their lovers into strange Countries,being first friends, before they were wives:

  • 刘世英 08-07

      Heereupon the Pilgrime stood up, and sodainly putting off hispoore linnen Frock, and the Hood from his head, using his Florentinetongue, he said; Tell me Madam, do you not know me? When she hadadvisedly beheld him, and knew him indeed to be Theobaldo, she wasstricken into a wonderfull astonishment, being as fearfull of him,as she was of the dead body which she saw lying in the street. And Idare assure you, that she durst not go neere him, to respect him asTheobaldo lately come from Cyprus, but (in terror) fled away from him;as if Theobaldo had bin newly risen out of his grave, and came thitherpurposely to affright her; wherefore he said. Be not affraid Madam,I am your Theobaldo, in health, alive, and never as yet died,neither have I received any wounds to kill mee, as you and my brethrenhad formerly imagined.

  • 潘渭滨 08-06

       Amongst these Merchants thus communing together, there was a youngproper man, named Ambroginolo of Placentia, who began to laugh atthe last prayses which Bernardo had used of his Wife, and seeming tomake a mockerie thereof, demaunded, if the Emperour had given him thispriviledge, above all other married men? Bernardo being somewhatoffended, answered: No Emperour hath done it, but the especiallblessing of heaven, exceeding all the Emperours on the earth in grace,and thereby have received this favour; whereto Ambroginolo presentlythus replyed. Bernardo, without all question to the contrary, Ibeleeve that what thou hast said, is true; but (for ought I canperceive) thou hast slender judgement in the Nature of things:because, if thou diddst observe them well, thou couldst not be of sogrosse understanding. For, by comprehending matters in their truekinde and nature, thou wouldst speake of them more correctly then thoudoest. And to the end, thou mayest not imagine, that we who havespoken of our Wives, doe thinke any otherwise of them, then as welland honestly as thou canst of thine, nor that any thing else didurge these speeches of them, or falling into this kinde ofdiscourse, but onely by a naturall instinct and admonition, I wilproceede familiarly, a little further with thee, uppon the matteralreadie propounded. I have evermore understoode, that man was themost noble creature, formed by God to live in this World, and woman inthe next degree to him: but man, as generally is beleeved, and as isdiscerned by apparant effects is the most perfect of both. Having thenthe most perfection in him, without all doubt, he must be so muchthe more firme and constant. So in like manner, it hath beene, andis universally graunted, that Woman is more various and mutable, maybe approved by and the reason thereof may be approved by many naturallcircumstances, which were needlesse now to make any mention of. If aman then be possessed of the greater stability, and yet cannotcontaine himselfe from condiscending, I say not to one thatentreates him, but to desire any other that please him; and beside, tocovet the enjoying of his owne pleasing contentment (a thing notchancing to him once in a moneth, but infinite times in a dayesspace). What can you then conceive of a fraile Woman, subject (bynature) to entreaties, flatteries, giftes, perswasions, and a thousandother inticing meanes, which a man (that is affected to her) canuse? Doest thou thinke then that she hath any power to containe?Assuredly, though thou shouldest rest so resolved, yet cannot I beof the same opinion. For I am sure thou beleevest, and must needesconfesse it, that thy wife is a Woman, made of flesh and blood, asother women are: if it be so, she cannot bee without the same desires,and the weaknesse or strength as other women have, to resistnaturall appetites as her owne are. In regard whereof, it is meerelyimpossible (although she be most honest) but she must needs doe thatwhich other Women doe: for there is nothing else possible, either tobe denied or affirmed to the contrary, as thou most unadvisedly hastdone.

  • 张李东 08-04

    {  And all in honour of the Spring.This Song, most sweetly sung by Madame Neiphila, was especiallycommended, both by the King, and all the rest of the Ladies. Whichbeing fully finished, the King gave oder, that everie one shouldrepaire to their Chambers, because a great part of the night wasalready spent.

  • 徐建国 08-04

      Greatly were the Ladies minds perplexed, when they heard, that thetwo poore Lovers were in danger to be burned: but hearing afterward oftheir happy deliverance, for which they were as joyfull againe; uponthe concluding of the Novell, the Queene looked on Madame Lauretta,enjoyning her to tell the next Tale, which willingly she undertooke todo, and thus began.

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