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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:塔希尔 大小:KJGV6Hzb68708KB 下载:mOS7dwO048933次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:bG2lhzqK28787条
日期:2020-08-06 06:37:06
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穆铁礼甫·哈斯木

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."
2.  "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?
3.  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."
4.  They gathered round the ghost of the son of Peleus, and the ghost ofAgamemnon joined them, sorrowing bitterly. Round him were gatheredalso the ghosts of those who had perished with him in the house ofAeisthus; and the ghost of Achilles spoke first.
5.  "Son of Atreus," it said, "we used to say that Jove had loved youbetter from first to last than any other hero, for you were captainover many and brave men, when we were all fighting together beforeTroy; yet the hand of death, which no mortal can escape, was laid uponyou all too early. Better for you had you fallen at Troy in thehey-day of your renown, for the Achaeans would have built a mound overyour ashes, and your son would have been heir to your good name,whereas it has now been your lot to come to a most miserable end."
6.  On this he gave his orders to the servants, who got the waggonout, harnessed the mules, and put them to, while the girl broughtthe clothes down from the linen room and placed them on the waggon.Her mother prepared her a basket of provisions with all sorts ofgood things, and a goat skin full of wine; the girl now got into thewaggon, and her mother gave her also a golden cruse of oil, that sheand her women might anoint themselves. Then she took the whip andreins and lashed the mules on, whereon they set off, and their hoofsclattered on the road. They pulled without flagging, and carried notonly Nausicaa and her wash of clothes, but the maids also who werewith her.

计划指导

1.  When it was time for them to start home, and they were folding theclothes and putting them into the waggon, Minerva began to considerhow Ulysses should wake up and see the handsome girl who was toconduct him to the city of the Phaeacians. The girl, therefore,threw a ball at one of the maids, which missed her and fell intodeep water. On this they all shouted, and the noise they made wokeUlysses, who sat up in his bed of leaves and began to wonder what itmight all be.
2.  The others all agreed, but Ulysses, to throw them off the scent,said, "Sirs, an old man like myself, worn out with suffering, cannothold his own against a young one; but my irrepressible belly urgesme on, though I know it can only end in my getting a drubbing. Youmust swear, however that none of you will give me a foul blow tofavour Irus and secure him the victory."
3.  Thus did he speak. The others all of them applauded his saying,and sent their servants to fetch the presents. Then Euryalus said,"King Alcinous, I will give the stranger all the satisfaction yourequire. He shall have sword, which is of bronze, all but the hilt,which is of silver. I will also give him the scabbard of newly sawnivory into which it fits. It will be worth a great deal to him."
4.  BOOK III.
5.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said; they went tothe store room, which they entered before Melanthius saw them, forhe was busy searching for arms in the innermost part of the room, sothe two took their stand on either side of the door and waited. By andby Melanthius came out with a helmet in one hand, and an olddry-rotted shield in the other, which had been borne by Laertes whenhe was young, but which had been long since thrown aside, and thestraps had become unsewn; on this the two seized him, dragged him backby the hair, and threw him struggling to the ground. They bent hishands and feet well behind his back, and bound them tight with apainful bond as Ulysses had told them; then they fastened a nooseabout his body and strung him up from a high pillar till he wasclose up to the rafters, and over him did you then vaunt, Oswineherd Eumaeus, saying, "Melanthius, you will pass the night on asoft bed as you deserve. You will know very well when morning comesfrom the streams of Oceanus, and it is time for you to be driving inyour goats for the suitors to feast on."
6.  "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."

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1.  On this Telemachus strode off through the yards, brooding hisrevenge upon the When he reached home he stood his spear against abearing-post of the cloister, crossed the stone floor of thecloister itself, and went inside.
2.  The suitors now aimed a second time, but again Minerva made theirweapons for the most part without effect. One hit a bearing-post ofthe cloister; another went against the door; while the pointed shaftof another struck the wall. Still, Amphimedon just took a piece of thetop skin from off Telemachus's wrist, and Ctesippus managed to grazeEumaeus's shoulder above his shield; but the spear went on and fell tothe ground. Then Ulysses and his men let drive into the crowd ofsuitors. Ulysses hit Eurydamas, Telemachus Amphimedon, and EumaeusPolybus. After this the stockman hit Ctesippus in the breast, andtaunted him saying, "Foul-mouthed son of Polytherses, do not be sofoolish as to talk wickedly another time, but let heaven direct yourspeech, for the gods are far stronger than men. I make you a presentof this advice to repay you for the foot which you gave Ulysses whenhe was begging about in his own house."
3.  "I stayed with Calypso seven years straight on end, and wateredthe good clothes she gave me with my tears during the whole time;but at last when the eighth year came round she bade me depart ofher own free will, either because Jove had told her she must, orbecause she had changed her mind. She sent me from her island on araft, which she provisioned with abundance of bread and wine. Moreovershe gave me good stout clothing, and sent me a wind that blew bothwarm and fair. Days seven and ten did I sail over the sea, and onthe eighteenth I caught sight of the first outlines of the mountainsupon your coast- and glad indeed was I to set eyes upon them.Nevertheless there was still much trouble in store for me, for at thispoint Neptune would let me go no further, and raised a great stormagainst me; the sea was so terribly high that I could no longer keepto my raft, which went to pieces under the fury of the gale, and I hadto swim for it, till wind and current brought me to your shores.
4.  Thus did they converse; but the others, when they had finished theirwork and the feast was ready, left off working, and took each hisproper place on the benches and seats. Then they began eating; byand by old Dolius and his sons left their work and came up, fortheir mother, the Sicel woman who looked after Laertes now that he wasgrowing old, had been to fetch them. When they saw Ulysses and werecertain it was he, they stood there lost in astonishment; butUlysses scolded them good-naturedly and said, "Sit down to yourdinner, old man, and never mind about your surprise; we have beenwanting to begin for some time and have been waiting for you."
5.   By and by morning came and woke Nausicaa, who began wonderingabout her dream; she therefore went to the other end of the house totell her father and mother all about it, and found them in their ownroom. Her mother was sitting by the fireside spinning her purpleyarn with her maids around her, and she happened to catch her fatherjust as he was going out to attend a meeting of the town council,which the Phaeacian aldermen had convened. She stopped him and said:
6.  "Telemachus," said one youngster, "means to be the death of us; Isuppose he thinks he can bring friends to help him from Pylos, oragain from Sparta, where he seems bent on going. Or will he go toEphyra as well, for poison to put in our wine and kill us?"

应用

1.  "Pisistratus, I hope you will promise to do what I am going to askyou. You know our fathers were old friends before us; moreover, we areboth of an age, and this journey has brought us together still moreclosely; do not, therefore, take me past my ship, but leave methere, for if I go to your father's house he will try to keep me inthe warmth of his good will towards me, and I must go home at once."
2.  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."
3.  "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.
4、  "Queen Penelope," answered Eurymachus, "we do not suppose thatthis man will take you away with him; it is impossible; but we areafraid lest some of the baser sort, men or women among the Achaeans,should go gossiping about and say, 'These suitors are a feeble folk;they are paying court to the wife of a brave man whose bow not oneof them was able to string, and yet a beggarly tramp who came to thehouse strung it at once and sent an arrow through the iron.' This iswhat will be said, and it will be a scandal against us."
5、  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:

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  • 王少薇 08-05

      "'Be sure, therefore,' continued Agamemnon, 'and not be too friendlyeven with your own wife. Do not tell her all that you know perfectlywell yourself. Tell her a part only, and keep your own counsel aboutthe rest. Not that your wife, Ulysses, is likely to murder you, forPenelope is a very admirable woman, and has an excellent nature. Weleft her a young bride with an infant at her breast when we set outfor Troy. This child no doubt is now grown up happily to man's estate,and he and his father will have a joyful meeting and embrace oneanother as it is right they should do, whereas my wicked wife didnot even allow me the happiness of looking upon my son, but killedme ere I could do so. Furthermore I say- and lay my saying to yourheart- do not tell people when you are bringing your ship to Ithaca,but steal a march upon them, for after all this there is no trustingwomen. But now tell me, and tell me true, can you give me any newsof my son Orestes? Is he in Orchomenus, or at Pylos, or is he atSparta with Menelaus- for I presume that he is still living.'

  • 胡方 08-05

      "On this Hercules went down again into the house of Hades, but Istayed where I was in case some other of the mighty dead should cometo me. And I should have seen still other of them that are gonebefore, whom I would fain have seen- Theseus and Pirithous gloriouschildren of the gods, but so many thousands of ghosts came round meand uttered such appalling cries, that I was panic stricken lestProserpine should send up from the house of Hades the head of thatawful monster Gorgon. On this I hastened back to my ship and orderedmy men to go on board at once and loose the hawsers; so theyembarked and took their places, whereon the ship went down thestream of the river Oceanus. We had to row at first, but presently afair wind sprang up.

  • 毛一鸣 08-05

       "O queen," he said, "I implore your aid- but tell me, are you agoddess or are you a mortal woman? If you are a goddess and dwell inheaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana,for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the otherhand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are yourfather and mother- thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters;how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scionas yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all willhe be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who takes youto his own home. I never yet saw any one so beautiful, neither man norwoman, and am lost in admiration as I behold you. I can only compareyou to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growingnear the altar of Apollo- for I was there, too, with much people afterme, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all mytroubles. Never yet did such a young plant shoot out of the groundas that was, and I admired and wondered at it exactly as I nowadmire and wonder at yourself. I dare not clasp your knees, but I amin great distress; yesterday made the twentieth day that I had beentossing about upon the sea. The winds and waves have taken me allthe way from the Ogygian island, and now fate has flung me upon thiscoast that I may endure still further suffering; for I do not thinkthat I have yet come to the end of it, but rather that heaven hasstill much evil in store for me.

  • 李一芳 08-05

      Penelope answered, "My son, I am so lost in astonishment that Ican find no words in which either to ask questions or to answerthem. I cannot even look him straight in the face. Still, if he reallyis Ulysses come back to his own home again, we shall get to understandone another better by and by, for there are tokens with which we twoare alone acquainted, and which are hidden from all others."

  • 何啸明 08-04

    {  Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."

  • 赛珍珠 08-03

      When he was in this plight, Ino daughter of Cadmus, also calledLeucothea, saw him. She had formerly been a mere mortal, but hadbeen since raised to the rank of a marine goddess. Seeing in whatgreat distress Ulysses now was, she had compassion upon him, and,rising like a sea-gull from the waves, took her seat upon the raft.}

  • 邓宁 08-03

      "As he spoke he pulled the herb out of the ground an showed mewhat it was like. The root was black, while the flower was as white asmilk; the gods call it Moly, and mortal men cannot uproot it, butthe gods can do whatever they like.

  • 陈独秀 08-03

      "Is that so?" exclaimed Minerva, "then you do indeed want Ulysseshome again. Give him his helmet, shield, and a couple lances, and ifhe is the man he was when I first knew him in our house, drinkingand making merry, he would soon lay his hands about these rascallysuitors, were he to stand once more upon his own threshold. He wasthen coming from Ephyra, where he had been to beg poison for hisarrows from Ilus, son of Mermerus. Ilus feared the ever-living godsand would not give him any, but my father let him have some, for hewas very fond of him. If Ulysses is the man he then was thesesuitors will have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.

  • 洛马诺夫 08-02

       Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.

  • 刘毅 07-31

    {  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.

  • 吴雪岚 07-31

      "'Stay where you are, then, 'answered I, 'eating and drinking at theship, but I must go, for I am most urgently bound to do so.'

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