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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:徐进均 大小:rfsMOLnh79241KB 下载:UdtDwkpg32060次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:NhS5LkfT52009条
日期:2020-08-06 21:39:44
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夏友胜

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Pedro all this while sitting in the Tree, so full of griefe, as noman could be more; about the houre of midnight (by the brightsplendour of the Moone) espied about some twenty Wolves, who, so sooneas they got a sight of the Horse, ran and engirt him round about.The Horse when he perceived them so neere him, drew his head sostrongly back-ward, that breaking the reines of his bridle, helaboured to escape from them. But being beset on every side, andutterly unable to helpe himself, he contended with his teeth and feetein his owne defence, till they haled him violently to the ground,and tearing his body in pieces, left not a jot of him but the barebones, and afterward ran ranging thorow the Forest. At this sight,poore Pedro was mightily dismaied, fearing to speed no better then hisHorse had done, and therefore could not devise what was best to bedone; for he saw no likelihood, of getting out of the Forest withlife. But day-light drawing on apace, and he almost dead with cold,having stood quaking so long in the Tree; at length by continualllooking every where about him, to discerne the least glimpse of anycomfort; he espied a great fire, which seemed to be about halfe a mileoff from him.
2.  After dinner, they sung divers excellent Canzonnets, and then somewent to sleepe, others played at the Chesse, and some at the Tables:But Dioneus and Madam Lauretta, they sung the love-conflict betweeneTroylus and Cressida. Now was the houre come, of repairing to theirformer Consistory or meeting place, the Queene having theretogenerally summoned them, and seating themselves (as they were wontto doe) about the faire fountaine. As the Queene was commanding tobegin the first Novell, an accident suddenly happened, which never hadbefalne before: to wit, they heard a great noyse and tumult, among thehoushold servants in the Kitchin. Whereupon, the Queene caused theMaster of the Houshold to be called, demaunding of him, what noyseit was, and what might be the occasion thereof? He made answere,that Lacisca and Tindaro were at some words of discontentment, butwhat was the occasion thereof, he knew not. Whereupon, the Queenecommanded that they should be sent for, (their anger and violentspeeches still continuing) and being come into her presence, shedemaunded the reason of their discord; and Tindaro offering to makeanswere, Lacisca (being somewhat more ancient then he, and of afiercer fiery spirit, even as if her heart would have leapt out of hermouth) turned her selfe to him, and with a scornefull frowningcountenance, said. See how this bold, unmannerly and beastly fellow,dare presume to speake in this place before me: Stand by (saucyimpudence) and give your better leave to answere; then turning tothe Queene, thus shee proceeded.
3.  HEEREIN ALL MEN ARE ADMONISHED, NEVER TO DISTRUST THE POWERFULL
4.  The Tale delivered by Neiphila, maketh mee remember a doubtfullcase, which sometime hapned to another Jew. And because that God,and the truth of his holy Faith, hath bene already very welldiscoursed on: it shall not seeme unfitting (in my poore opinion) todescend now into the accidents of men. Wherefore, I will relate amatter unto you, which being attentively heard and considered; maymake you much more circumspect, in answering to divers questions anddemands, then (perhaps) otherwise you would be. Consider then (mostwoorthy assembly) that like as folly or dulnesse, many times hathoverthrowne some men from place of eminencie, into most great andgreevous miseries: even so, discreet sense and good understanding,hath delivered many out of irksome perils, and seated them in safestsecurity. And to prove it true, that folly hath made many fall fromhigh authority, into poore and despised calamity; may be avouched byinfinite examples, which now were needelesse to remember: But, thatgood sense and able understanding, may proove to be the occasion ofgreat desolation, without happy prevention, I will declare unto you invery few words, and make it good according to my promise.
5.  Why dost thou behold me so advisedly? Whereunto Nello answered,saying Hast thou felt any paine this last night past? Thou lookestnothing so well, as thou didst yesterday. Calandrino began instantlyto wax doubtfull, and replyed thus. Dost thou see any alteration in myface, whereby to imagine, I should feele some paine? In good faithCalandrino (quoth Nello) me thinks thy countenance is strangelychanged, and surely it proceedeth from some great cause, and so hedeparted away from him.
6.  Upon a day, he and she walking to a goodly Wood, plentifullyfurnished with spreading Trees: having out gone the rest of theircompany, they made choise of a pleasant place, very daintily shadedand beautified with all sorts of flowers. There they spent some timein amorous talking, beside some other sweete embraces, which though itseemed over-short to them, yet was it so unadvisedly prolonged, thatthey were on a sodain surprized, first by the mother, and next byMesser Conrado himselfe; who greeving beyond measure, to be thustreacherously dealt withall, caused them to be apprehended by three ofhis servants; and (without telling them any reason why) led bound toanother Castle of his, and fretting with extremity rage, concludedin his minde, that they should both shamefully be put to death.

计划指导

1.  A beautifull young Virgine, named Andreana, became enamoured of ayoung Gentleman called Gabriello. In conference together, she declareda dreame of hers to him, and he another of his to her; whereuponGabriello fell downe sodainly dead in her armes. She, and herChamber-maide were apprehended, by the Officers belonging to theSeigneury, as they were carrying Gabriello, to lay him before his ownedoore. The Potestate offering violence to the Virgin, and sheresisting him vertuously: it came to the understanding of herFather, who approved the innocence of his daughter, and compassedher deliverance. But she afterward, being weary of all worldlyfelicities, entred into Religion, and became a Nun.
2.  The morning put on a vermillion countenance and made the Sunne torise blushing red, when the Queene (and all the faire company) werecome abroad forth of their Chambers; the Seneshall or great Masterof the Houshold, having (long before); sent all things necessary tothe place of their next intended meeting. And the people whichprepared there every needfull matter, suddainely when they saw theQueene was setting forward, charged all the rest of their followers,as if it had beene prepatation for a Campe; to make hast away with thecarriages, the rest of the Familie remaining behind, to attend uponthe Ladies and Gentlemen.
3.  Not doing harme to John or me,
4.  By the conclusion of Pamphilus his Novel, wherein the womans readywit, at a time of such necessity, carried deserved commendations:the Queen gave command to Madam Pampinea, that she should next beginwith hers, and so she did, in this manner. In some discourses(gracious Ladies) already past among us, the truth of apparitions indreames hath partly bin approved, whereof very many have made amockery. Neverthelesse, whatsoever hath heeretofore bin sayde, Ipurpose to acquaint you with a very short Novell, of a strangeaccident happening unto a neighbour of mine, in not crediting a Dreamewhich her Husband told her.
5.  OVER-LIGHT BELEEFE
6.  WHEREIN OLDE MEN ARE WITTILY REPREHENDED, THAT WILL MATCH

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1.  Heereupon, the Gentlewoman her selfe, became the solicitour to herFather and Mother, telling them plainly, that slie was willing to bethe Wife of Anastasio: which newes did so highly content them, thatupon the Sunday next following, the marriage was very worthilysolemnized, and they lived and loved together very kindly. Thus thedivine bounty out of the malignant enemies secret machinations, cancause good effects to arise and succeede. For, from this conceite offearfull imagination in her, not onely happened this long desiredconversion, of a Maide so obstinately scornfull and proud; butlikewise all the women of Ravenna (being admonished by her example)grew afterward more kind and tractable to mens honest motions, thenever they shewed themselves before. And let me make some use hereof(faire Ladies) to you, not to stand over-nicely conceited of yourbeauty and good parts, when men (growing enamored of you by them)solicite you with their best and humblest services. Remember then thisdisdainfull Gentlewoman, but more especially her, who being thedeath of so kinde a Lover, was therefore condemned to perpetuallpunishment, and he made the minister thereof, whom she had cast offwith coy disdaine, from which I wish your minds to be as free, as mineis ready to do you any acceptable service.
2.  It is not unknowne to you, partly by intelligence from ourreverend predecessours, as also some understanding of your owne,that many time have resorted to our City of Florence, Potestates andOfficers, belonging to the Marquesate of Anconia; who commonly weremen of lowe spirit, and their lives so wretched and penurious, as theyrather deserved to be tearmed Misers, then men. And in regard ofthis their naturall covetousnesse and misery, the Judges would bringalso in their company, such Scribes or Notaries, as being paraleldewith their Masters: they all seemed like Swaines come from the Plough,or bred up in some Coblers quality, rather then Schollers, or Studentsof Law.
3.  Pamphilus hath declared to us, by his Tale, how the goodnesse of Godregardeth not our errors, when they proceede from things which weecannot discerne. And I intend to approove by mine, what argument ofinfallible truth, the same benignity delivereth of it selfe, byenduring patiently the faults of them, that (both in word and worke)should declare unfaigned testimony of such gracious goodnesse, and notto live so dissolutely as they doe. To the end, that othersillumined by their light of life, may beleeve with the strongerconstancy of minde.
4.  About Evening, and (in this manner) alone by himselfe, neere tothe Palace of Nathan, he met him solitarily walking, not in pompousapparrell, whereby to bee distinguished from a meaner man: and,because he knew him not, neyther had heard any relation of hisdescription, he demanded of him, if he knew where Nathan then was?Nathan, with a chearfull countenance, thus replyed. Faire Syr, thereis no man in these parts, that knoweth better how to shew you Nathanthen I do; and therefore, if you be so pleased, I will bring you tohim. Mithridanes said, therein he should do him a great kindnesse:albeit (if it were possible) he would bee neyther knowne nor seeneof Nathan. And that (quoth he) can I also do sufficiently for you,seeing it is your will to have it so, if you will goe along with me.
5.   Buffalmaco and Bruno, liked and allowed the counsell ofCalandrino, which when they had (by severall commendations) givenhim assurance of, Bruno saide. I doe not thinke it a convenient timenow, for us to go about so weighty a businesse: for the Sun is yetin the highest degree, and striketh such a heate on the plaine ofMugnone, as all the stones are extreamly dryed, and the veryblackest will nowe seeme whitest. But in the morning, after the dew isfalne, and before the Sunne shineth forth, every stone retaineth histrue colour. Moreover, there be many Labourers now working on theplaine, about such businesse as they are severally assigned, whoseeing us in so serious a serch: may imagine what we seeke for, andpartake with us in the same inquisition, by which meanes they maychance to speed before us, and so wee may lose both our trot andamble. Wherefore, by my consent, if your opinion jumpe with mine, thisis an enterprize onely to be perfourmed in an early morning, whenthe blacke stones are to be distinguisht from the white, and aFestivall day were the best of all other, for then there will benone to discover us.
6.  Yet I will honour thee.

应用

1.  Then if not I, what Lover else can sing,
2.  When they had washed, and were seated at the Tables, dinner wasserved in most magnificent sort; so that if the Emperor himself hadbin there, he could not have bin more sumptuously served. And althoughSaladine and his Baschaes were very Noble Lords, and wonted to seematters of admiration: yet could they do no lesse now, but ratherexceeded in marvaile, considering the qualitie of the Knight, whomthey knew to bee a Citizen, and no Prince or great Lord. Dinnerbeing ended, and divers familiar conferences passing amongst them:because it was exceeding hot, the Gentlemen of Pavia (as it pleasedThorello to appoint) went to repose themselves awhile, and hekeeping company with his three guests, brought them into a goodlyChamber, where, because he would not faile in the least scruple ofcourtesie, or conceale from them the richest jewell which he had; hesent for his Lady and wife, because (as yet) they had not seene her.
3.  Like mine poore amorous Maide?
4、  "For this, and no other reason, did I presume to use the secretcunning which now is openly made knowne unto you: and Gisippusdisposed himselfe thereunto, which otherwise hee never determined tohave done, in contracting the marriage for me, and shee consentingto me in his name.
5、  When he had walked through the thicket, it came to passe, that (evenas good Fortune guided him) hee came into a faire Meadow, on everyside engirt with and in one corner thereof stoode a goodlyFountaine, whose current was both coole and cleare. Hard by it, uponthe greene grasse, he espied a very beautifull young Damosell, seemingto be fast asleepe, attired in such fine loose garments, as hidde verylittle of her white body: onely from the girdle downward, she ware akirtle made close unto her, of interwoven delicate silke; and at herfeete lay two other Damosels sleeping, and a servant in the samemanner. No sooner had Chynon fixed his eye upon her, but he stoodleaning upon his staffe; and viewed her very advisedly, withoutspeaking word, and in no meane admiration, as if he had never seenethe forme of a woman before. He began then to feele in his harshrurall understanding (whereinto never till now, either by painfullinstruction, or all other good meanes used to him, any honest civilityhad power of impression) a strange kinde of humour to awake, whichinformed his grosse and dull spirite, that this Damosell was thevery fairest, which ever any living man beheld.

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  • 颖儿 08-05

      Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.

  • 谢博 08-05

      GOVERNMENT, OF THE HONOURABLE LADIE LAURETTA

  • 罗皓菱 08-05

       Lambertuccio sware many terrible oathes, to observe her directionsin every part, and having drawne forth his Sword, grasping it naked inhis hand, and setting worse lookes on the businesse, then evernature gave him, because he had spent so much labour in vaine; hefailed not in a jot of the Ladies injunction. Beltramo havingcommanded his horse to safe custody, and meeting Lambertucciodiscending downe the staires, so armed, swearing, and mostextreamely storming, wondring extraordinarily at his threatning words,made offer to imbrace him., and understand the reason of hisdistemper. Lambertuccio repulsing him rudely, and setting foote in thestirrup, mounted on his Gelding, and spake nothing else but this. Isweare by the fairest of all my fortunes, although I misse of theeheere: yet I will be sure to find thee some where else, and so hegallopped mainely away.

  • 詹姆斯·杰伊·卡拉法诺 08-05

      As Love sets a keene edge on the dullest spirit, and (by a smalladvantage) makes a man the more adventurous: so this little time ofunseene talke, inspired him with courage, and her with witty advice,by what meanes his accesse might be much neerer to her, and theircommunication concealed from any discovery, the scituation of theplace, and benefit of time duly considered. Night must be the cloud totheir amorous conclusion, and therefore, so much thereof beingspent, as was thought convenient, he returned thither againe, providedof such grappling-yrons, as is required when men will clamber, madefast unto his hands and knees; by their helpe hee attained to thetop of the wall, whence discending downe into the Garden, there hefound the maine yard of a ship, whereof before she had given himinstruction, and rearing it up against her Chamber window, made thathis meanes for ascending thereto, she having left it open for hiseasier entrance.

  • 侍俊 08-04

    {  At the first, Signior Gilberto waxed exceeding angry, but when hefurther considered withall, the pure and honest intention of his Wife;wisely he pacified his former distemper, and saide. Dianora, it is notthe part of a wise and honest woman, to lend an eare to ambassagesof such immodest nature, much lesse to compound or make agreementfor her honesty, with any person, under any condition whatsoever.Those perswasions which the heart listeneth to, by allurement of theeare, have greater power then many do imagine, and nothing is souneasie or difficult, but in a lovers judgement it appeareth possible.Ill didst thou therefore first of all to listen, but worse (afterward)to contract.

  • 吴陶 08-03

      And to the end, that my speeches may not savor of any untruthagainst them; these men which I speake of, have not any habite atall of religious men, but onely the colour of their garments, andwhereas they in times past, desired nothing more then the salvation ofmens soules; these fresher witted fellowes, covet after women andwealth, and employ all their paines by their whispering confessions,and figures of painted fearefull examples, to affright and terrifieunsetled and weake consciences, by horrible and blasphemousspeeches; yet adding perswasion withall, that their sinnes may bepurged by Almes-deedes and Masses. To the end, that such as creditthem in these their dayly courses, being guided more by apparance ofdevotion, then any true compunction of heart, to escape severepenances by them enjoyned: may some of them bring bread, otherswine, others coyne, all of them matter of commoditie and benefit,and simply say, these gifts are for the soules of their good friendsdeceased.}

  • 许志安 08-03

      Greatly did the Ladies commend Madame Philomenaes Novell, laughingheartily at poore Calandrino, yet grieving withall, that he shouldbe so knavishly cheated, not onely of his Brawne, but two couple ofCapons, and a Flaggon of Wine beside. But the whole discourse beingended; the Queene commanded Madame Pampinea, to follow next with herNovell, and presently she thus began. It hapneth oftentimes (brightbeauties) that mockery falleth on him, that intended the same untoanother: And there. fore I am of opinion, that there is very litlewisedom declared on him or her, who taketh delight in mocking anyperson. must needs confesse, that we have smiled at many mockeries anddeceits, related in those excellent Novels, which we have alreadyheard: without any due revenge returned, but onely in this last ofsilly Calandrino. Wherefore, it is now my determination, to urge akind of compassionate apprehension, upon a very just retribution,happening to a Gentlewoman of our Citie, because her scorne felldeservedly upon her selfe, remaining mocked, and to the perill ofher life. Let Me then assure you, that your diligent attention mayredound to your benefit, because if you keepe your selves(henceforward) from being scorned by others: you shall expresse thegreater wisedome, and be the better warned by their mishaps.

  • 叶赫那拉氏 08-03

      It fortuned within few dayes after that Madam Lisetta being incompany with one of her Gossips, and their conference (as commonlyit falleth out to be) concerning other women of the City; theirbeauty, behaviour, amorous suters and servants, and generall opinionconceived of their worth, and merit; wherein Lisetta was over-muchconceyted of her selfe, not admitting any other to be her equall.Among other speeches, savouring of an unseasoned braine: Gossip (quothshe) if you knew what account is made of my beauty, and who holdesit in no meane estimation, you would then freely confesse, that Ideserve to be preferred before any other. As women are ambitious intheir owne opinions, so commonly are they covetous of one anotherssecrets, especially in matter of emulation, whereupon the Gossipthus replyed. Beleeve me Madam, I make no doubt but your speechesmay be true, in regard of your admired beauty, and many otherperfections beside; yet let me tell you, priviledges, how great andsingular soever they be, without they are knowen to others, besidesuch as do particularly enjoy them; they carry no more account, thenthings of ordinary estimation. Whereas on the contrary, when anyLady or Gentlewoman hath some eminent and peculiar favour, which fewor none other can reach unto, and it is made famous by generallnotion; then do all women else admire and honor her, as the glory oftheir kinde, and a miracle of Nature.

  • 雷虎 08-02

       The last command of the Queene, remained upon Madam Elissa, orEliza, who (without any delaying) thus beganne. Young Ladies, ithath often beene seene, that much paine hath beene bestowed, andmany reprehensions spent in vaine, till a word happening at adventure,and perhaps not purposely determined, hath effectually done the deede:as appeareth by the Tale of Madame Lauretta, and another of mine owne,where with I intend briefly to acquaint you, approving that whengood words are discreetly observed, they are of soveraigne power andvertue.

  • 谭谟晓 07-31

    {  THE SEVENTH DAY, THE TENTH NOVELL

  • 郑剑萍 07-31

      Or in my death listen my Swan-like Dittie.

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