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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:严民范 大小:jP8n9eLf72986KB 下载:dIe9IBY725496次
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日期:2020-08-11 10:16:41
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When he felt his amourous assaults, to exceed all power of longersufferance: he resolved determinately with himselfe, (being unprovidedof any better meanes) to take her away from her Father, and notonely she, but her Sister also; discovering both his love and intentto Count Guy de Montforte, who being a very worthy and vertuousLord, and meet to be a Counseller for a King, delivered his mind inthis manner.
2.  These two speciall observations, allowable in my judgement, andliving now in mee, seizing on my youthfull blood and yeeres, havefound no mean inducement to love, in regard of my husbands fardistance from me, medling in the rude uncivill actions of warre,when he should rather be at home in more sweet imployment. You seeSir, that these Oratours advance themselves here in your presence,to acquaint you with the extremity of my over-commanding agony: and ifthe same power hath dominion in you, which your discretion(questionlesse) cannot be voide of; then let me entreate such advicefrom you, as may rather helpe, then hinder my hopes. Beleeve it thenfor trueth Sir, that the long absence of my husband from me, thesolitary condition wherein I am left, il agreeing with the hot bloodrunning in my veines, and the temper of my earnest desires: have soprevailed against my strongest resistances, that not onely so weakea woman as I am, but any man of much more potent might, (living inease and idlenesse as I do) cannot withstand such continuall assaults,having no other helpe then flesh and blood.
3.  But I behold
4.  The Damosell delivered her message accordingly, and it was notlong before Mayster Doctor Simon came, with Bruno also in his company,and sitting downe on the beds side by Calandrino, hee began to tastehis pulse, and within a small while after, his Wife being come intothe Chamber, he said. Observe me well Calandrino, for I speake to theein the nature of a true friend; thou hast no other disease, but onlythou art great with child.
5.  At the same time, Signior Nicoluccio being absent from Bologna,and his Lady at a Farme-house of his in the Countrey (about threemiles distant from the City) because she was great with child,; andsomewhat neere the time of her teeming: it came to passe, that somedangerous accident befell her, which was so powerfull in operation, asno signe of life appeared remained in her, but she was reputed (evenin the judgement of the best Phisitians, whereof she wanted noattendance) to be verily dead. And because in the opinion of herparents and neerest kinred, the time for her deliverance was yet sofarre off, as the Infant within her, wanted much of a perfectcreature: they made the lesse mourning; but in the next Church, asalso the vault belonging to her Ancestors, they gave her buriallvery speedily.
6.  Hereupon, he brought him into the hall where his furniture was, asalso all his people, and commanding a window to be opned, wherat hemight behold his horses, he said. My Lord, let me plainely give you tounderstand, that neither cowardise, or basenesse of minde, inducedGhinotto di Tacco (which is my selfe) to become a lurking robber onthe high-wayes, an enemy to the Pope, and so (consequently) to theRomane Court: but onely to save his owne life and honour knowinghimselfe to be a Gentleman cast out of his owne house, and having(beside) infinite enemies. But because you seeme to be a worthyLord, I will not (although I have cured your stomacks disease) dealewith you as I doe to others, whose goods (when they fall into mypower) I take such part of as I please: but rather am wellcontented, that my necessities being considered by your selfe, youspare me out a proportion of the things you have heere, answerableto your owne liking. For all are present here before you, both in thisHall, and in the Court beneath, free from any spoyle, or the leastimpairing. Wherefore, give a part, or take all, if you please, andthen depart hence when you will, or abide heere still, for now you areat your owne free liberty.

计划指导

1.  In the time of this plague and dreadful visitation, the LordPresident, his Lady, Sonnes, Daughters, Brothers, Nephewes, andKindred dyed, none remaining alive, but one onely Daughtermarriageable, a few of the houshold servants, beside Perotto, whom(after the sickenesse was more mildly asswaged) with counsell andconsent of the Countrey people, the young Lady accepted to be herhusband, because hee was a man so worthy and valiant; and of all theinheritance left by her deceased Father, she made him Lord, and solecommander. Within no long while after, the King of Englandunderstanding that his President of Wales was dead, and Fame liberallyrelating the vertues, valour, and good parts of Perotto the Piccard,hee created him President thereof, and to supply the place of hisdeceased Lord. These faire fortunes, within the compasse of so short atime, fell to the two innocent children of the Count D'Angiers afterthey were left by him as lost and forlorne.
2.  Mervaile and amazement, encreased in Nicostratus far greater thenbefore, hearing him to avouch still so constantly what he had seene,no contradiction being able to alter him, which made him rashly sweareand say. I will see my selfe, whether this Peare-tree bee enchanted,or no: and such wonders to be seene when a man is up in it, as thouwouldst have us to beleeve. And being mounted up so hy, that they weresafe from his sodaine comming on them, Lydia had soone forgotten hersicknes, and the promised kisse cost her above twenty more, besideverie kinde and hearty embraces, as lovingly respected and entertainedby Pyrrhus. Which Nicostratus beholding aloft in the tree; cryed outto her, saying. Wicked woman, What doest thou meane? And thouvillain Pyrrhus, Darst thou abuse thy Lord, who hath reposed so muchtrust in thee? So, descending in haste downe againe, yet crying soto them still: Lydia replyed, Alas my Lord, Why do you raile andrave in such sort? So, he( found her seated as before, and Pyrrhuswaiting with dutiful reverence, even as when he climbed up the Tree:but yet he thought his sight not deceyved, for all their demure andformall behaviour, which made him walke up and downe, extreamelyfuming and fretting unto himselfe, and which in some milder mannerto qualifie, Pyrrhus spake thus to him.
3.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, THAT SOMETIME BY ADVENTUROUS ACCIDENT,
4.  Moreover, he prosecuted his impious purpose with such alluringperswasions: that being a weake woman, and not willing to endureover many Amorous proofes (onely to acquaint you with his mostsawcie immodestie, and to revenge your selfe uppon him as best youmay; your selfe beeing best able to pronounce him guiltie) I madehim promise, to meete him in our Garden, presently aftermidde-night, and to finde mee sitting under the Pine-Tree; nevermeaning (as I am vertuous) to be there. But, that you may know thedeceite and falshoode of your Servant, I would have you to put on myNight-gowne, my head Attire, and Chinne-cloath, and sitting but ashort while there underneath the Pine-Tree: such is his insatiatedesire, as he will not faile to come, and then you may proceede, asyou finde occasion.
5.  Now, to proceede where we left, Friar Onyon having left thisserviceable youth at his lodging, to see that no bodie should meddlewith his commodities, especially his Wallet, because of the sacredthings therein contained: Guccio Imbrata, who as earnestly affected tobe in the Kitchin, as Birds to hop from branch to branch,especially, when anie of the Chamber-maides were there, espyed oneof the Hostesses Female attendants, a grosse fat Trugge, low ofstature, ill faced, and worse formed, with a paire of brests liketwo bumbards, smelling loathsomely of grease and sweate; downe sheedescended into the Kitchin, like a Kite upon a peece of Carion. ThisBoy, or Knave, chuse whither you will style him, having carelesly leftFryar Onyons Chamber doore open, and all the holy things so much to beneglected, although it was then the moneth of August, when heate is inthe highest predominance, yet hee would needs sit downe by the fire,and began to conferre with this amiable creature, who was called bythe name of Nuta.
6.  Having acquainted his Father with this determination, he concludedwith him, to have that from him in a moment which might supply hiswants because he would be clothed gallantly, and mounted honourably.And seeking for a servant necessary to attend on him, it chancedthat Fortarigo hearing thereof, came presently to Aniolliero,intreating him in the best manner he could, to let him waite on him ashis serving man, promising both dutiful and diligent attendance: yetnot to deaund any other wages, but onely payment of his ordinaryexpences. Aniolliero made him answere, that he durst not give himentertainment, not in regard of his insufficiency, and unaptnessefor service: but because he was a great Gamester, and divers timeswould be beastly drunke? whereto Fortarigo replyed that hee wouldrefraine from both those foule vices, and addict all his endeavorwholly to please him, without just taxation of any grosse errour;making such solemne vowes and protestations beside, as conqueredAniolliero, and won his consent.

推荐功能

1.  While matters went on in this successefull manner, although he couldnot chuse, but still he remembred his cruell Mistresse, and was verydesperately transported for her love, as coveting (above all thingselse) to see her once more; yet was he of such powerfull constancy, as7 whole yeeres together, he vanquished all those fierce conflicts. Buton a day it chanced he heard a song sung in Cyprus, which hehimselfe had formerly made, in honour of the love he bare to hisMistresse, and what delight he conceived, by being dayly in herpresence; whereby he gathered, that it was impossible for him toforget her, and proceeded on so desirously, as he could not live,except he had a sight of her once more, and therefore determined onhis returne to Florence. Having set all his affaires in due order,accompanied with a servant of his onely, he passed to Ancona, wherewhen he was arrived, he sent his Merchandises to Florence, in nameof the Merchant of Ancona, who was his especiall friend and partner;travayling himselfe alone with his servant, in the habite of aPilgrime, as if he had beene newly returned from Jerusalem.
2.  In the morning, he sent to the Bridegroom, and advertised him,that he (with a stranger newly arrived) intended to dine with him,which the Gentleman accepted in thankefull manner. And when dinnertime came, Thorello in his strange disguise went with the Abbot to theBridegroomes house, where he was lookt on with admiration of all theguests, but not knowne or suspected by any one; because the Abbotreported him to be a Sarracine, and sent by the Soldane (in Ambassage)to the King of France. Thorello was seated at a by-table, but directlyopposite to the new Bride, whom hee much delighted to looke on, andeasily collected by her sad countenance, that shee was scarcely wellpleased with this new nuptialls. She likewise beheld him very often,not in regard of any knowlege she took of him: for the bushiness ofhis beard, strangeness of habit, (but most of all) firm beleefe of hisdeath, was the maine prevention.
3.  In his riding towards France, as he passed by Naples, heeovertooke another yong Gentleman, a native of Antioch, and namedGiosefo, whose journey lay the same way as the others did. Havingridden in company some few dayes together, as it is a custome commonlyobserved among Travellers, to understand one anothers Countrey andcondition, as also to what part his occasions call him: so happened itwith them, Giosefo directly telling him, that he journyed, towards thewise King Salomon, to desire his advise what meanes he shouldobserve in the reclaiming of a wilfull wife, the most froward andselfe-willed woman that ever lived; whom neither faire perswasions,nor gentle courtesies could in any manner prevaile withall.Afterward he demaunded of Melisso, to know the occasion of histravell, and whither.
4.  Beside, many Italians returning home, and carrying this report forcredible; some were so audaciously presumptuous, as they avouched upontheir oathes, that not onely they saw him dead, but were present athis buriall likewise. Which rumour comming to the eare of his Wife,and likewise to his kinred and hers: procured a great and grievousmourning among them, and all that happened to heare thereof.
5.   Never speake so faire and flattering to us, for we are movedbeyond all compasse of patience. All misfortunes in the worlde fallupon you, and an evill death may you dye, like the most false andperfidious Traitor living on the earth. We must beate our braines, andmove all our most endeared friends, onely for your honor andadvancement: while wee were well neere starved to death in the coldlike Dogs, and, by your breach of promise, have bin this night soextreamly beaten, as if (like Asses) we should have beene driven toRome.
6.  Neiphila cried out: "Mark this, Philostratus; in trying to teachus you might have had such a lesson as Masetto di Lamporechio had ofthe nuns, and recovered your speech just as your bare bones hadlearned to whistle without a master." Finding himself thus evenlymatched, Philostratus ceased his pleasantries; and beginning toconsider on the charge committed to his care, called the Master of thehoushold, to know in what estate all matters were, because where anydefect appeared, every thing might be the sooner remedied, for thebetter satisfaction of the company, during the time of hisauthority. Then returning backe to the assembly, thus he began. LovelyLadies, I would have you to know, that since the time of ability inme, to distinguish betweene good and evill, I have alwayes benesubject (perhaps by the meanes of some beauty heere among us) to theproud and imperious dominion of love, with expression of all duty,humility, and most intimate desire to please yet all hath prooved tono purpose, but still I have bin rejected for some other, whereby mycondition hath falne from ill to worse, and so still it is likely,even to the houre: of my death. In which respect, it best pleaseth me,that our conferences to morrow, shall extend to no other argument, bitonly such cases as are most conformable to my calamity, namely ofsuch, whose love hath had unhappy ending, because I await no otherissue of mine; nor willingly would I be called by any other name,but only, the miserable and unfortunate Lover.

应用

1.  Of sighes or teares, which joy doth countercheck:
2.  But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.
3.  WHEREBY THE AUTHOR, APPROVING THE CHRISTIAN FAITH,
4、  HIS NEIGHBOUR; MAY RECEIVE THE LIKE INJURY (IF
5、  The time being come, which was concluded on for Iphigeniaesmarriage, in regard that the affianced husband had sent for her:Chynon thus communed with his owne thoughts. Now is the time (quothhe) to let my divine Mistresse see, how truly and honourably I doeaffect her, because (by her) I am become a man. But if I could bepossessed of her, I should growe more glorious, then the commoncondition of a mortall man, and have her I will, or loose my life inthe adventure. Being thus resolved, he prevailed with divers youngGentlemen his friends, making them of his faction, and secretlyprepared a Shippe, furnished with all things for a Naval fight,setting sodainly forth to Sea, and hulling abroad in those parts bywhich the vessell should passe, that must convey Iphigenia to Rhodesto her husband. After many honours done to them, who were to transporther thence unto Rhodes, being imbarked, they set saile upon theirBon viaggio.

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网友评论(Tg5DOayY48637))

  • 桂治华 08-10

      Goe love, and tell the torments, etc.

  • 凌情 08-10

      The Father and Mother, much dismayed and displeased at this haplesseaccident, applying her with continuall comforts, Phisicke, and thebest skill remayning in all the Phisitions, sought all possible meaneswayes to give her succour: but all proved to no effect, because inregard of her choyce (which could sort to none other then adesperate end) she was desirous to live no longer. Now it fortuned,that her parents offering her whatsoever remained in their power toperforme, a sudden apprehension entred her minde, to wit, that (ifit might possible be done) before she dyed, she would first have theKing to know, in what manner she stood affected to him. Wherefore, oneday she entreated her Father that a Gentleman, named Manutio deArezza, might be permitted to come see her. This Manutio was (in thosetimes) held to be a most excellent Musitian, both for his voyce insinging, and exquisite skill in playing on Instruments, for which hewas highly in favour with King Piero, who made (almost) daily use ofhim, to heare him both sing and play.

  • 陈无择 08-10

       The Marquesse of Saluzzo, named Gualtiero, being constrained bythe importunate solliciting of his Lords, and other inferiourpeople, to joyne himselfe in marriage; tooke a woman according tohis owne liking, called Grizelda, she being the daughter of a pooreCountriman, named Janiculo, by whom he had two children, which hepretended to be secretly murdered. Afterward, they being grown toyeres of more stature, and making shew of taking in marriage anotherwife, more worthy of his high degree and Calling: made a seemingpublique liking of his owne daughter, expulsing his wife Grizeldapoorely from him. But finding her incomparable patience; moredearely (then before) hee received her into favour againe, brought herhome to his owne Pallace, where (with her children) hee caused her andthem to be respectively honoured, in despight of all her adverseenemies.

  • 雷友建 08-10

      Honourable Praetor, mine owne horrid and abominable actions, haveinduced me thus to intrude my selfe, for clearing the strictcontention betweene these two persons. And questionlesse, some Godor greater power, hath tormented my wretched soule, and socompunctually solicited me, as I cannot chuse, but make openconfession of my sinne. Here therefore, I doe apparantly publish, thatneither of these men is guilty of the offence, wherewith so wilfullyeach chargeth himselfe. I am the villaine, who this morning murderedthe man in the Cave, one of no greater honesty then my selfe, andseeing this poore man lie there sleeping, while we were dividing thestolne booties betweene us; I slew my Companyon, because I would bethe sole possessor. As for Noble Lord Titus, he had no reason thusto accuse himselfe, because [he] is a man of no such base quality: letthem both then be delivered, and inflict the sentence of death on me.

  • 邓琦饶 08-09

    {  All these in one faire flower,

  • 徐海东 08-08

      ALL THINGS, AS SHALL MAKE HIM FORGETFULL}

  • 李莹莹 08-08

      I can tell you (faire Ladies) a short Novell, against such as arecontinually offensive to us, yet we being no way able to offend him;at least, in the same manner as they do injurie us. And for yourbetter understanding what and who they be, they are our lusty Priests,who advance their Standard, and make their publike predicationsagainst our wives, winning such advantage over them, that they canpardon them both of the sinne and punnishment, whensoever they areonce subjected unto theyr perswasions, even as if they brought theSoldane bound and captived, from Alexandria to Avignon. Whichimperious power, we (poore soules) cannot exercise on them,considering, we have neither heart nor courage, to do our devoire injust revenge on their Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, and Friends, withthe like spirit as they rise in armes against our wives. Andtherefore, I meane to tell you a tale of a Country mans wife, moreto make you laugh at the conclusion thereof; then for anysingularity of words or matter: yet this benefite you may gainethereby, of an apparant proofe, that such Sinamon, amorous andperswading Priests, are not alwayes to be credited on their words orpromises.

  • 刘仪伟 08-08

      Let me tell you then, that (as it is afermed by many) in the time ofthe Emperour Frederick, first of that name, the Christians, for thebetter recovery of the holy land, resolved to make a generall voyageover the Seas. Which being understood by Saladine, a very worthyPrince, and then Soldan of Babylon: he concluded with himselfe, thathe would (in person) goe see, what preparation the ChristianPotentates made for this Warre, that hee might the better providefor himselfe. Having setled all things orderly in Aegypt for thebusines, and making an outward appearance, as if he purposed apilgrimage to Mecha: he set onward on his journey, habited like aMerchant, attended onely with two of his most Noble and wisestBaschaes, and three waiting servants.

  • 杜鹏 08-07

       These words were not a little welcome to my Lord Abbot, because(thereby) he halfe assured himselfe, that Fortune had laid open thepath to his hoped pleasures. Whereupon he said. Deare daughter, I makeno question to the contrary, but it must needes be an exceedinginfelicity, to so faire and goodly a young woman as you are, to beplagued with so sottish an husband, brainsick, and without the useof common understanding; but yet subject to a more hellishaffliction then all these, namely jealousie, and therefore you beingin this wofull manner tormented, your tribulations are not only somuch the more credited, but also as amply grieved for, and pittied. Inwhich heavy and irksome perturbations, I see not any meanes of remedy,but onely one, being a kinde of physicke (beyond all other) to curehim of his foolish jealousie; which medicine is very familiar to me,because I know best how to compound it, alwayes provided, that you canbe of so strong a capacity, as to be secret in what I shall say untoyou.

  • 杨础维 08-05

    {  The Pope, who was of a magnanimious spirit, and one that highlyaffected men of vertue, hearing the commendable motion made by theAbbot; returned answere, that he was as willing to grant it, as theother desired it, sending Letters of safe conduct for his commingthither. Ghinotto receiving such assurance from the Court of Rome,came thither immediatly, to the great joy of the Lord Abbot: and thePope finding him to be a man of valor and worth, uponreconciliation, remitted all former errors, creating him knight, andLord Prior of the very chiefest Hospitall in Rome. In which Officehe lived long time after, as a loyall servant to the Church, and anhonest thankefull friend to the Lord Abbot of Clugny.

  • 柯南道尔 08-05

      Madam Eliza having ended her compassionate discourse, which indeedehad moved all the rest to sighing; the Queene, who was faire, comelyof stature, and tarrying a very majesticall countenance, smilingmore familarly then the other, spake to them thus. It is verynecessary, that the promise made to Dioneus, should carefully be kept,and because now there remaineth none, to report any more Novels, butonely he and my selfe: I must first deliver mine, and he (who takes itfor an honour) to be the last in relating his owne, last let him befor his owne deliverance. Then pausing a little while, thus shebegan againe. Many times among vulgar people, it hath passed as acommon Proverbe: That the deceiver is often trampled on, by such as hehath deceived. And this cannot shew it selfe (by any reason) to betrue, except such accidents as awaite on treachery, doe really makea just discovery thereof. And therefore according to the course ofthis day observed, I am the woman that must make good what I havesaide for the approbation of that Proverbe: no way (I hope)distastfull to you in the hearing, but advantageable to preserve youfrom any such beguiling.

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