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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:万寿路 大小:z45xeZ9Y50744KB 下载:5f1v3TpB24043次
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日期:2020-08-07 11:39:05
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朱迪·丹奇

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Medon said, "I wish, Madam, that this were all; but they areplotting something much more dreadful now- may heaven frustratetheir design. They are going to try and murder Telemachus as he iscoming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to get newsof his father."
2.  His father shed tears and answered, "Sir, you have indeed come tothe country that you have named, but it is fallen into the hands ofwicked people. All this wealth of presents has been given to nopurpose. If you could have found your friend here alive in Ithaca,he would have entertained you hospitably and would have requiredyour presents amply when you left him- as would have been only rightconsidering what you have already given him. But tell me, and tellme true, how many years is it since you entertained this guest- myunhappy son, as ever was? Alas! He has perished far from his owncountry; the fishes of the sea have eaten him, or he has fallen a preyto the birds and wild beasts of some continent. Neither his mother,nor I his father, who were his parents, could throw our arms about himand wrap him in his shroud, nor could his excellent and richly doweredwife Penelope bewail her husband as was natural upon his death bed,and close his eyes according to the offices due to the departed. Butnow, tell me truly for I want to know. Who and whence are you- tell meof your town and parents? Where is the ship lying that has brought youand your men to Ithaca? Or were you a passenger on some other man'sship, and those who brought you here have gone on their way and leftyou?"
3.  "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'
4.  Telemachus saw Eumaeus long before any one else did, and beckonedhim to come and sit beside him; so he looked about and saw a seatlying near where the carver sat serving out their portions to thesuitors; he picked it up, brought it to Telemachus's table, and satdown opposite him. Then the servant brought him his portion, andgave him bread from the bread-basket.
5.  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.
6.  "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying hisdamages, I will pay you myself." So Vulcan answered, "In this case Icannot and must not refuse you."

计划指导

1.  It was not long ere Penelope came to know what the suitors wereplotting; for a man servant, Medon, overheard them from outside theouter court as they were laying their schemes within, and went to tellhis mistress. As he crossed the threshold of her room Penelope said:"Medon, what have the suitors sent you here for? Is it to tell themaids to leave their master's business and cook dinner for them? Iwish they may neither woo nor dine henceforward, neither here noranywhere else, but let this be the very last time, for the waste youall make of my son's estate. Did not your fathers tell you when youwere children how good Ulysses had been to them- never doinganything high-handed, nor speaking harshly to anybody? Kings may saythings sometimes, and they may take a fancy to one man and dislikeanother, but Ulysses never did an unjust thing by anybody- which showswhat bad hearts you have, and that there is no such thing as gratitudeleft in this world."
2.  "She at once called her husband Antiphates from the place ofassembly, and forthwith he set about killing my men. He snatched upone of them, and began to make his dinner off him then and there,whereon the other two ran back to the ships as fast as ever theycould. But Antiphates raised a hue and cry after them, and thousandsof sturdy Laestrygonians sprang up from every quarter- ogres, not men.They threw vast rocks at us from the cliffs as though they had beenmere stones, and I heard the horrid sound of the ships crunching upagainst one another, and the death cries of my men, as theLaestrygonians speared them like fishes and took them home to eatthem. While they were thus killing my men within the harbour I drew mysword, cut the cable of my own ship, and told my men to row with alftheir might if they too would not fare like the rest; so they laid outfor their lives, and we were thankful enough when we got into openwater out of reach of the rocks they hurled at us. As for the othersthere was not one of them left.
3.  Outside the gate of the outer court there is a large garden of aboutfour acres with a wall all round it. It is full of beautiful trees-pears, pomegranates, and the most delicious apples. There are lusciousfigs also, and olives in full growth. The fruits never rot nor failall the year round, neither winter nor summer, for the air is sosoft that a new crop ripens before the old has dropped. Pear growson pear, apple on apple, and fig on fig, and so also with thegrapes, for there is an excellent vineyard: on the level ground of apart of this, the grapes are being made into raisins; in anotherpart they are being gathered; some are being trodden in the wine tubs,others further on have shed their blossom and are beginning to showfruit, others again are just changing colour. In the furthest partof the ground there are beautifully arranged beds of flowers thatare in bloom all the year round. Two streams go through it, the oneturned in ducts throughout the whole garden, while the other iscarried under the ground of the outer court to the house itself, andthe town's people draw water from it. Such, then, were thesplendours with which the gods had endowed the house of king Alcinous.
4.  Then he said to his friend Piraeus, "Piraeus, son of Clytius, youhave throughout shown yourself the most willing to serve me of allthose who have accompanied me to Pylos; I wish you would take thisstranger to your own house and entertain him hospitably till I cancome for him."
5.  "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came,but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, themale sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating aboutthe pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting;but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all thesheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find outthat the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was goingout, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of mycrafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:
6.  As he spoke he threw his shabby old tattered wallet over hisshoulders, by the cord from which it hung, and Eumaeus gave him astick to his liking. The two then started, leaving the station incharge of the dogs and herdsmen who remained behind; the swineherd ledthe way and his master followed after, looking like some broken-downold tramp as he leaned upon his staff, and his clothes were all inrags. When they had got over the rough steep ground and were nearingthe city, they reached the fountain from which the citizens drew theirwater. This had been made by Ithacus, Neritus, and Polyctor. There wasa grove of water-loving poplars planted in a circle all round it,and the clear cold water came down to it from a rock high up, whileabove the fountain there was an altar to the nymphs, at which allwayfarers used to sacrifice. Here Melanthius son of Dolius overtookthem as he was driving down some goats, the best in his flock, for thesuitors' dinner, and there were two shepherds with him. When he sawEumaeus and Ulysses he reviled them with outrageous and unseemlylanguage, which made Ulysses very angry.

推荐功能

1.  "The man is no fool," answered Penelope, "it would very likely be ashe says, for there are no such abominable people in the whole world asthese men are."
2.  Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."
3.  BOOK XXIII.
4.  Telemachus went through, and out of, the cloisters spear in hand-not alone, for his two fleet dogs went with him. Minerva endowed himwith a presence of such divine comeliness that all marvelled at him ashe went by, and the suitors gathered round him with fair words intheir mouths and malice in their hearts; but he avoided them, and wentto sit with Mentor, Antiphus, and Halitherses, old friends of hisfather's house, and they made him tell them all that had happened tohim. Then Piraeus came up with Theoclymenus, whom he had escortedthrough the town to the place of assembly, whereon Telemachus atonce joined them. Piraeus was first to speak: "Telemachus," said he,"I wish you would send some of your women to my house to take awathe presents Menelaus gave you."
5.   "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'
6.  "Then, being much troubled in mind, I said to my men, 'My friends,it is not right that one or two of us alone should know the propheciesthat Circe has made me, I will therefore tell you about them, sothat whether we live or die we may do so with our eyes open. First shesaid we were to keep clear of the Sirens, who sit and sing mostbeautifully in a field of flowers; but she said I might hear themmyself so long as no one else did. Therefore, take me and bind me tothe crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright,with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash therope's ends to the mast itself. If I beg and pray you to set mefree, then bind me more tightly still.'

应用

1.  "Hear me," she cried, "Daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove,unweariable. If ever Ulysses while he was here burned you fat thighbones of sheep or heifer, bear it in mind now as in my favour, andsave my darling son from the villainy of the suitors."
2.  "Ulysses," said Minerva, "noble son of Laertes, think how you canlay hands on these disreputable people who have been lording it inyour house these three years, courting your wife and making weddingpresents to her, while she does nothing but lament your absence,giving hope and sending your encouraging messages to every one ofthem, but meaning the very opposite of all she says'
3.  She went straight to the beautifully decorated bedroom in whichthere slept a girl who was as lovely as a goddess, Nausicaa,daughter to King Alcinous. Two maid servants were sleeping near her,both very pretty, one on either side of the doorway, which wasclosed with well-made folding doors. Minerva took the form of thefamous sea captain Dymas's daughter, who was a bosom friend ofNausicaa and just her own age; then, coming up to the girl's bedsidelike a breath of wind, she hovered over her head and said:
4、  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.
5、  "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."

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  • 木拉提别克 08-06

      And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."

  • 胡嘉许 08-06

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment drop theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become still more bitteragainst them. Now there happened to be among them a ribald fellow,whose name was Ctesippus, and who came from Same. This man,confident in his great wealth, was paying court to the wife ofUlysses, and said to the suitors, "Hear what I have to say. Thestranger has already had as large a portion as any one else; this iswell, for it is not right nor reasonable to ill-treat any guest ofTelemachus who comes here. I will, however, make him a present on myown account, that he may have something to give to the bath-woman,or to some other of Ulysses' servants."

  • 安努普利 08-06

       "'My son,' she answered, 'most ill-fated of all mankind, it is notProserpine that is beguiling you, but all people are like this whenthey are dead. The sinews no longer hold the flesh and bones together;these perish in the fierceness of consuming fire as soon as life hasleft the body, and the soul flits away as though it were a dream. Now,however, go back to the light of day as soon as you can, and noteall these things that you may tell them to your wife hereafter.'

  • 尹同跃 08-06

      She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.

  • 褚孟形 08-05

    {  Then he said to his friend Piraeus, "Piraeus, son of Clytius, youhave throughout shown yourself the most willing to serve me of allthose who have accompanied me to Pylos; I wish you would take thisstranger to your own house and entertain him hospitably till I cancome for him."

  • 尤威评 08-04

      BOOK XXII.}

  • 王海宇 08-04

      "Pisistratus, I hope you will promise to do what I am going to askyou. You know our fathers were old friends before us; moreover, we areboth of an age, and this journey has brought us together still moreclosely; do not, therefore, take me past my ship, but leave methere, for if I go to your father's house he will try to keep me inthe warmth of his good will towards me, and I must go home at once."

  • 贝弗利山塞缪尔·戈尔德温 08-04

      "Is that so?" exclaimed Minerva, "then you do indeed want Ulysseshome again. Give him his helmet, shield, and a couple lances, and ifhe is the man he was when I first knew him in our house, drinkingand making merry, he would soon lay his hands about these rascallysuitors, were he to stand once more upon his own threshold. He wasthen coming from Ephyra, where he had been to beg poison for hisarrows from Ilus, son of Mermerus. Ilus feared the ever-living godsand would not give him any, but my father let him have some, for hewas very fond of him. If Ulysses is the man he then was thesesuitors will have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.

  • 朱剑红 08-03

       "When at last we got to the island where we had left the rest of ourships, we found our comrades lamenting us, and anxiously awaitingour return. We ran our vessel upon the sands and got out of her onto the sea shore; we also landed the Cyclops' sheep, and dividedthem equitably amongst us so that none might have reason tocomplain. As for the ram, my companions agreed that I should have itas an extra share; so I sacrificed it on the sea shore, and burned itsthigh bones to Jove, who is the lord of all. But he heeded not mysacrifice, and only thought how he might destroy my ships and mycomrades.

  • 克·帕尔哈提 08-01

    {  And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."

  • 马蒂诺 08-01

      As he spoke he sprang from his seat, threw his crimson cloak fromhim, and took his sword from his shoulder. First he set the axes ina row, in a long groove which he had dug for them, and had Wadestraight by line. Then he stamped the earth tight round them, andeveryone was surprised when they saw him set up so orderly, thoughhe had never seen anything of the kind before. This done, he went onto the pavement to make trial of the bow; thrice did he tug at it,trying with all his might to draw the string, and thrice he had toleave off, though he had hoped to string the bow and shoot through theiron. He was trying for the fourth time, and would have strung ithad not Ulysses made a sign to check him in spite of all hiseagerness. So he said:

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