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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:萨韦洛夫 大小:Odr8ypJj33170KB 下载:CbJ2gf0g67960次
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日期:2020-08-11 10:09:52
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."
2.  Presently the sun set and it became dark, whereon the pair retiredinto the inner part of the cave and went to bed.
3.  They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."
4.  "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'
5.  "You say truly, my dear father," answered Telemachus, "and you shallsee, if you will, that I am in no mind to disgrace your family."
6.  He began with his victory over the Cicons, and how he thence reachedthe fertile land of the Lotus-eaters. He told her all about theCyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten hisbrave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received himhospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not toreach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out tosea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, wherethe people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himselfand his own ship only. Then he told of cunning Circe and her craft,and how he sailed to the chill house of Hades, to consult the ghost ofthe Theban prophet Teiresias, and how he saw his old comrades in arms,and his mother who bore him and brought him up when he was a child;how he then heard the wondrous singing of the Sirens, and went on tothe wandering rocks and terrible Charybdis and to Scylla, whom noman had ever yet passed in safety; how his men then ate the cattleof the sun-god, and how Jove therefore struck the ship with histhunderbolts, so that all his men perished together, himself alonebeing left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and thenymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wantedhim to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal sothat he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to lether do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to thePhaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, andsent him back in a ship to his own country after having given himgold, bronze, and raiment in great abundance. This was the lastthing about which he told her, for here a deep sleep took hold uponhim and eased the burden of his sorrows.

计划指导

1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."
2.  "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.
3.  "I am very much distressed," said Telemachus, "by what you have justtold me. How can I take this stranger into my house? I am as yetyoung, and am not strong enough to hold my own if any man attacksme. My mother cannot make up her mind whether to stay where she is andlook after the house out of respect for public opinion and thememory of her husband, or whether the time is now come for her to takethe best man of those who are wooing her, and the one who will makeher the most advantageous offer; still, as the stranger has come toyour station I will find him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with asword and sandals, and will send him wherever he wants to go. Or ifyou like you can keep him here at the station, and I will send himclothes and food that he may be no burden on you and on your men;but I will not have him go near the suitors, for they are veryinsolent, and are sure to ill-treat him in a way that would greatlygrieve me; no matter how valiant a man may be he can do nothingagainst numbers, for they will be too strong for him."
4.  As he spoke the sun set and it came on dark, whereon Minerva said,"Sir, all that you have said is well; now, however, order thetongues of the victims to be cut, and mix wine that we may makedrink-offerings to Neptune, and the other immortals, and then go tobed, for it is bed time. People should go away early and not keep latehours at a religious festival."
5.  "And now, O queen, have pity upon me, for you are the first person Ihave met, and I know no one else in this country. Show me the way toyour town, and let me have anything that you may have brought hitherto wrap your clothes in. May heaven grant you in all things yourheart's desire- husband, house, and a happy, peaceful home; forthere is nothing better in this world than that man and wife should beof one mind in a house. It discomfits their enemies, makes thehearts of their friends glad, and they themselves know more about itthan any one."
6.  And Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, if, then,the gods now mean that Ulysses should get home, we should first sendMercury to the Ogygian island to tell Calypso that we have made up ourminds and that he is to return. In the meantime I will go to Ithaca,to put heart into Ulysses' son Telemachus; I will embolden him to callthe Achaeans in assembly, and speak out to the suitors of his motherPenelope, who persist in eating up any number of his sheep and oxen; Iwill also conduct him to Sparta and to Pylos, to see if he can hearanything about the return of his dear father- for this will makepeople speak well of him."

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1.  "I was trying to come on here, but the gods detained me in Egypt,for my hecatombs had not given them full satisfaction, and the godsare very strict about having their dues. Now off Egypt, about as faras a ship can sail in a day with a good stiff breeze behind her, thereis an island called Pharos- it has a good harbour from which vesselscan get out into open sea when they have taken in water- and thegods becalmed me twenty days without so much as a breath of fairwind to help me forward. We should have run clean out of provisionsand my men would have starved, if a goddess had not taken pity upon meand saved me in the person of Idothea, daughter to Proteus, the oldman of the sea, for she had taken a great fancy to me.
2.  "If, therefore, you want my father to give you an escort and to helpyou home, do as I bid you; you will see a beautiful grove of poplarsby the road side dedicated to Minerva; it has a well in it and ameadow all round it. Here my father has a field of rich garden ground,about as far from the town as a man' voice will carry. Sit downthere and wait for a while till the rest of us can get into the townand reach my father's house. Then, when you think we must have donethis, come into the town and ask the way to the house of my fatherAlcinous. You will have no difficulty in finding it; any child willpoint it out to you, for no one else in the whole town has anythinglike such a fine house as he has. When you have got past the gates andthrough the outer court, go right across the inner court till you cometo my mother. You will find her sitting by the fire and spinning herpurple wool by firelight. It is a fine sight to see her as she leansback against one of the bearing-posts with her maids all ranged behindher. Close to her seat stands that of my father, on which he sitsand topes like an immortal god. Never mind him, but go up to mymother, and lay your hands upon her knees if you would get homequickly. If you can gain her over, you may hope to see your owncountry again, no matter how distant it may be."
3.  And Ulysses answered, "I will tell you all about it. If there weremeat and wine enough, and we could stay here in the hut with nothingto do but to eat and drink while the others go to their work, Icould easily talk on for a whole twelve months without everfinishing the story of the sorrows with which it has pleased heaven tovisit me.
4.  "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."
5.   Presently Ulysses got up to go towards the town; and Minerva sheda thick mist all round him to hide him in case any of the proudPhaecians who met him should be rude to him, or ask him who he was.Then, as he was just entering the town, she came towards him in thelikeness of a little girl carrying a pitcher. She stood right in frontof him, and Ulysses said:
6.  "Father," replied Telemachus, "you will come to know me by and by,and when you do you will find that I can keep your counsel. I do notthink, however, the plan you propose will turn out well for eitherof us. Think it over. It will take us a long time to go the round ofthe farms and exploit the men, and all the time the suitors will bewasting your estate with impunity and without compunction. Prove thewomen by all means, to see who are disloyal and who guiltless, but Iam not in favour of going round and trying the men. We can attend tothat later on, if you really have some sign from Jove that he willsupport you."

应用

1.  Here poor Ulysses would have certainly perished even in spite of hisown destiny, if Minerva had not helped him to keep his wits about him.He swam seaward again, beyond reach of the surf that was beatingagainst the land, and at the same time he kept looking towards theshore to see if he could find some haven, or a spit that should takethe waves aslant. By and by, as he swam on, he came to the mouth ofa river, and here he thought would be the best place, for there wereno rocks, and it afforded shelter from the wind. He felt that therewas a current, so he prayed inwardly and said:
2.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.
3.  "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."
4、  But she would not give him full victory as yet, for she wished stillfurther to prove his own prowess and that of his brave son, so sheflew up to one of the rafters in the roof of the cloister and sat uponit in the form of a swallow.
5、  "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."

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  • 姚亚香 08-10

      His father shed tears and answered, "Sir, you have indeed come tothe country that you have named, but it is fallen into the hands ofwicked people. All this wealth of presents has been given to nopurpose. If you could have found your friend here alive in Ithaca,he would have entertained you hospitably and would have requiredyour presents amply when you left him- as would have been only rightconsidering what you have already given him. But tell me, and tellme true, how many years is it since you entertained this guest- myunhappy son, as ever was? Alas! He has perished far from his owncountry; the fishes of the sea have eaten him, or he has fallen a preyto the birds and wild beasts of some continent. Neither his mother,nor I his father, who were his parents, could throw our arms about himand wrap him in his shroud, nor could his excellent and richly doweredwife Penelope bewail her husband as was natural upon his death bed,and close his eyes according to the offices due to the departed. Butnow, tell me truly for I want to know. Who and whence are you- tell meof your town and parents? Where is the ship lying that has brought youand your men to Ithaca? Or were you a passenger on some other man'sship, and those who brought you here have gone on their way and leftyou?"

  • 詹永胜 08-10

      Thus did he speak, and they all of them laughed heartily. Eurymachusthen said, "This stranger who has lately come here has lost hissenses. Servants, turn him out into the streets, since he finds itso dark here."

  • 窦德长 08-10

       "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'

  • 顾祝同 08-10

      Pisistratus thought how he should do as he was asked, and in the endhe deemed it best to turn his horses towards the ship, and putMenelaus's beautiful presents of gold and raiment in the stern ofthe vessel. Then he said, "Go on board at once and tell your men to doso also before I can reach home to tell my father. I know howobstinate he is, and am sure he will not let you go; he will come downhere to fetch you, and he will not go back without you. But he will bevery angry."

  • 费丹丹 08-09

    {  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.

  • 张金山 08-08

      "When Circe saw me sitting there without eating, and in great grief,she came to me and said, 'Ulysses, why do you sit like that asthough you were dumb, gnawing at your own heart, and refusing bothmeat and drink? Is it that you are still suspicious? You ought notto be, for I have already sworn solemnly that I will not hurt you.'}

  • 艾丽娅 08-08

      "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.

  • 麦克纳马拉 08-08

      Thus did he speak, and his saying pleased them well, so Mulius ofDulichium, servant to Amphinomus, mixed them a bowl of wine andwater and handed it round to each of them man by man, whereon theymade their drink-offerings to the blessed gods: Then, when they hadmade their drink-offerings and had drunk each one as he was minded,they took their several ways each of them to his own abode.

  • 伊丽莎白·莫斯 08-07

       And Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, if, then,the gods now mean that Ulysses should get home, we should first sendMercury to the Ogygian island to tell Calypso that we have made up ourminds and that he is to return. In the meantime I will go to Ithaca,to put heart into Ulysses' son Telemachus; I will embolden him to callthe Achaeans in assembly, and speak out to the suitors of his motherPenelope, who persist in eating up any number of his sheep and oxen; Iwill also conduct him to Sparta and to Pylos, to see if he can hearanything about the return of his dear father- for this will makepeople speak well of him."

  • 才进宝 08-05

    {  She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then, going upstairs with her handmaids into her room,she mourned her dear husband till Minerva shed sweet sleep over hereyes. But the suitors were clamorous throughout the covered cloisters,and prayed each one that he might be her bed fellow.

  • 冯慧秋 08-05

      With these words he led the way, and the others followed after. Aservant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of thecloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all thechief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd ofseveral thousands of people followed them, and there were manyexcellent competitors for all the prizes. Acroneos, Ocyalus, Elatreus,Nauteus, Prymneus, Anchialus, Eretmeus, Ponteus, Proreus, Thoon,Anabesineus, and Amphialus son of Polyneus son of Tecton. There wasalso Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and wasthe best looking man among the Phaecians except Laodamas. Three sonsof Alcinous, Laodamas, Halios, and Clytoneus, competed also.

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