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日期:2020-08-11 03:13:26
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  At the same time, and in our City of Florence also, there wasanother man, named Blondello, very low of stature, yet comly formed,quicke witted, more neat and brisk then a Butterflye, alwaieswearing a wrought silke cap on his head, and not a haire staring outof order, but the tuft flourishing above the forehead, and he suchanother trencher-fly for the table, as our forenamed Guiotto was. Itso fel out on a morning in the Lent time, that hee went into theFishmarket, where he bought two goodly Lampreyes, for Messer Vierode Cherchi, and was espied by Guiotto, who to Blondello) said. What isthe meaning of this cost, and for whom is it? Whereto Blondello thusanswered. Yesternight, three other Lampries, far fairer and fatterthen these, and a whole Sturgeon, were sent unto Messer CorsoDonati, and being not sufficient to feede divers Gentlemen, whom heehath invited this day to dine with him, hee caused me to buy these twobeside: Doest not thou intend to make one among them? Yes I warrantthee, replied Guiotto, thou knowst I can invite my selfe thither,without any other bidding.
2.  Bajazeth was a man of stearne lookes, rough and harsh both in speechand behaviour; yet causing the Lady to be honourably used divers dayestogether, shee became thereby well comforted and recovered. And seeingher beautie to exceede all comparison, he was afflicted beyondmeasure, that he could not understand her, nor she him, whereby heecould not know of whence or what she was. His amorous flamesencreasing more and more; by kinde, courteous, and affable actions, helaboured to compasse what he aymed at. But all his endeavour proved tono purpose, for she refused all familiar privacie with him, which somuch the more kindled the fury of his fire. This being well observedby the Lady, having now remained there a moneth and more, andcollecting by the customes of the Countrey, that she was among Turkes;and in such a place, where although she were knowne, yet it wouldlittle advantage her; beside, that long protraction of time wouldprovoke Bajazeth by faire meanes or force to obtaine his will: shepropounded to her selfe (with magnanimity of spirit) to tread allmisfortunes under her feete, commanding her Women (whereof shee hadbut three now remaining alive) that they should not disclose whatshe was, except it were in some such place, where manifest signesmight yeeld hope of regaining their liberty. Moreover, sheadmonished them stoutly to defend their honour and chastity;affirming, that she had absolutely resolved with her selfe, that neverany other shou enjoy her, but her intended husband: wherein herwomen did much commend her, promising to preserve their reputation,according as shee had commanded.
3.  Chynon being now wounded to the heart (where never any civillinstruction could before get entrance) with loves piercing dart, bythe bright beauty of Iphigenia, mooved much admiration (falling fromone change to another) in his Father, Kindred, and all else thatknew him. For first, he requested of his Father, that he might behabited and respected like to his other Brethren, whereto right gladlyhe condiscended. And frequenting the company of civill youths,observing also the cariage of Gentlemen, especially such as wereamorously enclined: he grew to a beginning in short time (to thewonder of every one) not onely to understand the first instructionof letters, but also became most skilfull, even amongst them that werebest exercised in Philosophy. And afterward, love to Iphigenia beingthe sole occasion of this happy alteration, not onely did his harshand clownish voyce convert it selfe more mildely, but also heebecame a singular Musitian, and could perfectly play on anyinstrument. Beside, he tooke delight in the riding and managing ofgreat horses, and finding himselfe of a strong and able body, heexercised all kinds of Military Disciplines, as well by Sea, as on theland. And, to be breefe, because I would not seeme tedious in therepetition of all his vertues, scarsly had he attained to the fourthyeare, after he was thus falne in love, but hee became generallyknowne, to be the most civil, wise, and worthy Gentleman, aswell forall vertues enriching the minde, as any whatsoever to beautifie thebody, that very hardly he could be equalled throughout the wholekingdome of Cyprus.What shall we say then (vertuous Ladies) concerning this Chynon?Surely nothing else, but that those high and divine vertues, infusedinto his gentle soule, were by envious Fortune bound and shut up insome small angle of his intellect, which being shaken and set atliberty by love, (as having a farre more potent power then Fortune, inquickning and reviving the dull drowsie spirits) declared his mightyand soveraigne Authority, in setting free so many faire and preciousvertues unjustly detayned, to let the worlds eye behold them truly, bymanifest testimony from whence he can deliver those spiritssubjected to his power, and guid them (afterward) to the highestdegrees of honour. And although Chynon by affecting Iphigenia,failed in some particular things; yet notwithstanding, his FatherAristippus duely considering, that love had made him a man, whereas(before) he was no better then a beast: not onely endured allpatiently, but also advised him therein, to take such courses asbest liked himselfe. Neverthelesse, Chynon (who refused to be calledGalesus, which was his naturall name indeed) remembring that Iphigeniatearmed him Chynon, and coveting (under this title) to accomplishthe issue of his honest amorous desire: made many motions toCiphaeus the Father of Iphigenia, that he would be pleased to lethim enjoy her in marriage. But Ciphaeus told him, that he hadalready passed his promise for her, to a Gentleman of Rhodes, namedPasimondo, which promise he religiously intended to performe.
4.  The man comming before him, hee demanded, if the accusationintimated against him, was true or no? Whereto the honest mananswered, that he could not denie the speaking of such words, anddeclared in what manner they were uttered. Presently the Inquisitor,most devoutly addicted to Saint John with the golden beard, saide;What? Doest thou make our Lord a drinker, and a curious quaffer ofwines, as if he were a glutton, a belly-god, or a Taverne haunter,as thou, and other drunkards are. Being an hypocrite, as thou art,thou thinkest this to be but a light matter, because it may seeme soin thine owne opinion: but I tell thee plainely, that it deservethfire and faggot, if I should proceede in justice to inflict it onthee: with these, and other such like threatning words, as also a verystearne and angry countenance, he made the man beleeve himselfe tobe an Epicure, and that hee denied the eternity of the soule;whereby he fell into such a trembling feare, as doubting indeede,least he should be burned; that, to be more mercifully dealt withal,he rounded him in the eare, and by secret meanes, so annointed hishands with Saint Johns golden grease (a verie singular remedie againstthe Disease Pestilentiall in covetous Priests, especially FriarsMinors, that dare touch no money) as the case became very quicklyaltered.
5.  Upon this conclusion, Albert departed, leaving Lisetta in nomeane pride of imagination, that God Cupid should be enamoured ofher beauty; and therefore she thought each houre a yeare, till shemight see him in the mortall shape of Friar Albert. And now was hisbraine wonderfully busied, to visite her in more then common or humanemanner; and therefore he made him a sute (close to his body) ofwhite Taffata, all poudred over with Starres, and spangles of Gold,a Bow and Quiver of Arrowes, with wings also fastened to his backebehinde him, and all cunningly covered with his Friars habit, whichmust be the sole meanes of his safe passage.
6.  The Abbot riding on, with newer crotchets in his braine then hehad before the sight of Alessandro, it fortuned, that after diversdayes of travaile, they came to a small Country Village, whichaffoorded little store of Lodging, and yet the Abbot would needeslye there. Alessandro, being well acquainted with the Hoste of thehouse, willed him to provide for the Abbot and his people, and then tolodge him where hee thought it meetest. Now before the Abbotscomming thither, the Harbenger that marshalled all such matters, hadprovided for his Traine in the Village, some in one place, andothers elsewhere, in the best maner that the Towne could yeelde. Butwhen the Abbot had supt, a great part of the night being spent, andevery one else at his rest; Alessandro demaunded of the Hoste, whatprovision he had made for him, and how hee should be lodged thatnight?

计划指导

1.  If any one I chance to finde,
2.  At the hearing of these words, the King began somewhat to admireat her gracious carriage, and saide within himselfe. What know I,whether this Virgin is sent to me by the direction of heaven, or no?Why should I disdaine to make proofe of her skill? Her promise is,to cure me in a small times compasse, and without any paine oraffliction to me: she shall not come so farre, to returne againewith the losse of he labour, I am resolved to try her cunning, andthereon saide. Faire Virgin, if you cause me to breake my setleddetermination, and faile of curing me, what can you expect to followthereon? Whatsoever great King (quoth she) shall please you. Let me bestrongly guarded, yet not hindered, when I am to prosecute thebusinesse: and then if I do not perfectly heale you within eightdaies, let a good fire be made, and therein consume my body untoashes. But if I accomplish the cure, and set your Highnesse freefrom all further greevance, what recompence then shall remaine to me?
3.  Alas sweet Madame, answered quaking and quivering Reniero, bee thenso favourable to me, as to free me from forth this open Court, wherethere is no shelter or helpe for me, the snow falling still soexceedingly, as a man might easily be more then halfe buried in it:let me but within your doore, and there I will wait your own goodleisure. Alas deare Reniero (answered Helena) I dare not doe it,because the doore maketh such a noyse in the opening, as it will betoo easily heard by my Brother: but I will goe and use such meanes, asshortly hee shall get him gone, and then I dare boldly give youentrance. Doe so good Madame, replyed Reniero, and let there be afaire fire made ready, that when I am within, I may the sooner warmemy selfe; for I am so strangely benummed with colde, as well-neere Iam past all sence of feeling.
4.  And questionlesse, being in his wounted drunken humour, hee hathlyen with one of his sweet Consorts, about whose toe he found thethred, and finding her as false to him, as he hath alwayes been to me:Did not onely beat her, but also cut the haire from her head. Andhaving not yet recovered his sences, is verily perswaded, and cannotbe altered from it; but that hee performed all this villany to me. Andif you doe but advisedly observe his countenance, he appeareth yetto be more then halfe drunke.
5.  THE FIFT DAY, THE FIFTH NOVELL
6.  My Lord, the question propounded by you, is faire and worthy, and toanswere my opinion truely thereof, doth necessarily require sometime of consideration, if it might stand with your liking to allow it:but if not, let me first make entrance to my reply, with a prettytale, and well worth the hearing. I have oftentimes heard it reported,that (long since) there was a very wealthy man, who (among otherprecious Jewels of his owne) had a goodly Ring of great valew; thebeauty and estimation whereof, made him earnestly desirous to leave itas a perpetuall memory and honour to his successors. Whereupon, hewilled and ordained, that he among his male children, with whom thisRing (being left by the Father) should be found in custody after hisdeath; hee and none other, was to bee reputed his heire, and to behonoured and reverenced by all the rest, as being the prime andworthiest person. That Sonne, to whom this Ring was left by him,kept the same course to his posterity, dealing (in all respects) ashis predecessor had done; so that (in short time) the Ring (fromhand to hand) had many owners by Legacie.

推荐功能

1.  After that Madame Eliza had made an end of her Song, which sheesealed up with an heart-breaking sigh: they all sate amazedlywondering at her moanes, not one among them being able toconjecture, what should be the reason of her singing in this manner.But the King being in a good and pleasing temper, calling Tindaro,commaunded him to bring his Bagge-pipe, by the sound whereof theydanced divers daunces: And a great part of the night being spent inthis manner, they all gave over, and departed to their Chambers.
2.  The King hearing these words, sodainely presumed, that by somecounterfeit person or other, the Queene had beene this night beguiled:wherefore (very advisedly) hee considered, that in regard the partywas unknowne to her, and all the women about her; to make no outwardappearance of knowing it, but rather concealed it to himselfe. Farrefrom the indiscretion of some haire-braind men, who presently wouldhave answered and sworne; I came hither this night, till now.Whereupon many dangers might ensue, to the dishonour and prejudiceof the Queene: beside, her error being discovered to her, mightafterward be an occasion, to urge a wandring in her appetite, and tocovet after change againe. But by this silence, no shame redoundedto him or her, whereas prating, must needs be the publisher of openinfamie: yet was hee much vexed in his minde, which neither bylookes or words hee would discover, but pleasantly said to the Queene,Why Madam, although I was once heere before to night, I hope youmislike not my second seeing you, nor if I should please to comeagaine. No truly Sir, quoth she, I onely desire you to have care ofyour health. Well, said the King, I will follow your counsaile, andnow returne to mine owne lodging againe, committing my Queene to hergood rest.
3.  In the meane while, Madame Helena remaining still on the Tower,began to comfort her selfe with a little vaine hope, yet sighing andweeping incessantly, seating her selfe so well as shee could, whereany small shelter might yeelde the least shade, in expectation ofthe Schollers returning: one while weeping, then againe hoping, butmost of all despairing, by his so long tarrying away with herGarments; so that beeing over-wearied with anguish and longwatching, she fell into a little slumbering. But the Sunne was soextreamly hot, the houre of noone being already past, that it meerlyparched her delicate body, and burnt her bare head so violently: asnot onely it seared all the flesh it touched; but also cleft andchinkt it strangely, beside blisters and other painfull scorchingsin the flesh which hindred her sleeping, to help her self (by allpossible means) waking. And the Turret being covered with Lead, gavethe greater addition to her torment; for, as she removed from oneplace to another, it yeelded no mitigation to the burning heate, butparched and wrinkled the flesh extraordinarily, even as when a pieceof parchment is throwne into the fire, and recovered out againe, cannever be extended to his former forme.
4.  THE SEVENTH DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
5.   Ferando having lyen entranced three dayes and three nights, felt hisstomacke well prepared to eate, and feeding very heartily, stillsaide; O my good Wife, O my loving Wife, long mayest thou live forthis extraordinary kindnesse. I promise thee (sweete heart) while Iwas alive, I cannot remember, that ever any foode and wine was halfeso pleasing to me. O my deare Wife; O my hony Wife. Canst thou(quoth the Monke) prayse and commend her now, using her sovillainously in thy life time? Then did he whip him more fiercely thenbefore, when Ferando holding up his hands, as craving for mercy,demanded wherefore he was so severely punished? I am so commanded(quoth the Monke) by supreme power, and twice every day must thou bethus disciplinde. Upon what occasion? replyed Ferando. Because(quoth the Monke) thou wast most notoriously jealous of thy Wife, sheebeing the very kindest woman to thee, as all the Countrey containethnot her equall. It is too true, answered Ferando, I was over-muchjealous of her indeede: but had I knowne, that jealousie was such ahatefull sinne against Heaven, I never would have offended therein.
6.  The Countesse having well observed her words, and considered thereonfrom point to point; debating soberly with her owne thoughts, insuch a doubtfull case what was best to be done. When she hadunderstood which was the house, the ancient Ladies name, andlikewise her daughters, to whom her husband was now soaffectionately devoted; she made choise of a fit and convenienttime, when (in her Pilgrimes habit) secretly she went to the house.There she found the mother and daughter in poore condition, and withas poore a family: whom after she had ceremoniously saluted, shetold the old Lady, that she requested but a little conference withher. The Lady arose, and giving her kinde entertainement, they wenttogether into a withdrawing Chamber, where being both set downe, theCountesse began in this manner.

应用

1.  What sweet content due understanding lends:
2.  No sooner were all the Neighbours gone, and the Maide at libertyfrom her Mistresse, but unlocking the doore, into the Chamber shewent; and finding Ruggiero sitting fast asleepe, she began to hunchand punche him, entreating him (softly) to awake: but all was to nopurpose, for he neither moved, or answered one word; whereat herpatience being somewhat provoked, she punched him more rudely, andangerly saide: Awake for shame thou drowsie dullard, and if thou be sodesirous of sleeping, get thee home to thine owne lodging, becausethou art not allowed to sleepe here. Ruggiero being thus rudelypunched, fell from off the Coffer flat on the ground, appearing noother in all respects, then as if he were a dead body. Whereat theMaide being fearfully amazed, plucking him by the nose and youngbeard, and what else she could devise to do, yet all her labourproving still in vaine: she was almost beside her wits, stamping andraving all about the roome, as if sense and reason had forsaken her;so violent was her extreame distraction.
3.  Which do most displease.
4、  "Modest shame makes me silent in my wealth and possessions, my mindetruely telling mee, that honest contented povertie, is the mostancient and richest inheritance, of our best and Noblest Romanes,which opinion, if it bee condemned by the understanding of theignorant multitude, and heerein wee shall give way to them bypreferring riches and worldly treasures, then I can say that I amaboundantly provided, not as ambitious, or greedily covetous, butsufficiently stored with the goods of Fortune.
5、  Love, if I can scape free, etc.

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网友评论(ENQiOMe877861))

  • 何建刚 08-10

      In good sadnesse Sir, I am not able to remember and tell you (withinthe compasse of a thousand yeares) what, and how manie severall kindesof Musicall Instruments, were continually played on before us; whatmultiplicity of Waxe lights burned in all partes of the roomes;neither the excessive store of rich Drugs, Marchpanes, Comfites, andrare Banquetting stuffe, consumed there at one Feasting, wherein therewanted no bounty of the best and purest wines. Nor do I (MasterDoctor) repute you so weakly witted, as to think, that in the timeof our being thus assembled there, any of us al were cloathed insuch simple and meane Garments, as ordinarily are worne in the streetson mens bodies, or any so silly as the verie best you have: No Sir,not any one man among us, but appeared by his apparrell, equall to thegreatest Emperour on the earth, his robe most sumptuouslyimbroidered with precious stones, Pearles, and Carbuncles, as theworld affoordeth not the like. But above all the rest, the delightsand pleasures there, are beyond my capacity to expresse, or(indeede) any comparison: as namely, store of goodly and beautifullwomen, brought thither from all parts of the world; alwayesprovided, if men bee desirous of their company: but for your easiercomprehension, I will make some briefe relation of them to you,according as I heard them there named.

  • 王朝跃 08-10

      The Lord Abbot recreated himselfe a while with his owne people, towhom he recounted, the course of his life since hee saw them; and theylikewise told him, how kindly they had bin initeated by Ghinotto.But when dinner time was come, the Lord Abbot and all his company,were served with costly viands and excellent Wines, without Ghinottoesmaking himselfe knowne to the Abbot: till after he had beeneentertained some few dayes in this order: into the great Hall of theCastle, Ghinotto caused all the Abbots goods and furniture to beebrought, and likewise into a spacious Court, wheron the windowes ofthe said Court gazed, all his mules and horses, with their sumpters,even to the very silliest of them, which being done, Ghinotto wentto the Abbot, and demaunded of him, how he felt his stomacke now,and whether it would serve him to venter on horsebacke as yet, orno? The Lord Abbot answered, that he found his stomacke perfectlyrecovered, his body strong enough to endure travell, and all thingswell, so hee were delivered from Ghinotto.

  • 屠知力 08-10

       Let us now convert our lookes to Wales, to Perotto; being leftethere with the other Lord Marshall, who was the President of thatCountrey. On hee grew in yeeres, choisely respected by his Lord,because hee was most comely of person, and forward to all valiantattempts: so that in Tourneyes, joustes, and other actions of Armes,his like was not to bee found in all the Island, being named onelyPerotto the valiant Piccard, and so was he famed farre and neere. AsGod had not forgotten his Sister, so in mercy he became as mindefullof him; for, a contagious mortalitie hapning in the Country, thegreater part of the people perished thereby, the rest flying thenceinto other partes of the Land, whereby the whole Province becamedispeopled and desolate.

  • 任鸣 08-10

      But truth lives not in men,

  • 马伟锋 08-09

    {  In the time of Azzo, Marquesse of Ferrara, there was a Marchantnamed Rinaldo de Este, who being one day at Bologna, about someespeciall businesse of his owne; his occasions there ended, and ridingfrom thence towards Verona, he fell in company with other Horsemen,seeming to be Merchants like himselfe, but indeede were Theeves, menof most badde life and conversation; yet he having no such mistrust ofthem, rode on, conferring with them very familiarly. They perceivinghim to be a Merchant, and likely to have some store of money abouthim, concluded betweene themselves to rob him, so soone as theyfound apt place and opportunity. But because he should conceive nosuch suspition, they rode on like modest men, talking honestly andfriendly with him, of good parts and disposition appearing in him,offering him all humble and gracious service, accounting themselveshappy by his companie, as hee returned the same courtesie to them,because hee was alone, and but one servant with him.

  • 李沛瑶 08-08

      Beastly drunken Knave as thou art, this night thou shalt not comewithin these doores, I am no longer able to endure thy base behaviour,it is more then high time, that thy course of life should beepubliquely known, and at what drunken houres thou returnest home tothy house. Tofano, being a man of very impatient Nature, was as bitterunto her in words on the other which the Neighbours about them (bothmen and Women) hearing; looked forth of their Windowes, and demaundinga reason for this their disquietnesse, Cheta (seeming as if shewept) sayde.}

  • 杨文丽 08-08

      True it is, that if it be spoken by way of answer, and theanswerer biteth doggedly, because himselfe was bitten in the samemanner before: he is the lesse to bee blamed, because hee makethpayment but with coine of the same stampe. In which respect, anespeciall care is to bee had, how, when, with whom, and where wejest or gibe, whereof very many proove too unmindfull, as appeared(not long since) by a Prelate of ours, who met with a byting, no lessesharpe and bitter, then had first come from himselfe before, asverie briefely I intend to tell you how.

  • 刘彬彬 08-08

      There is the great Lady of Barbanicchia; the Queene of Baschia;the Wife to the great Soldane, the Empresse of Osbeccho; theCiancianfera of Norniera; the Semistante of Berlinzona; and theScalpedra of Narsia. But why do I breake my braine, in numbering up somany to you? All the Queenes of the world are there, even so farreas to the Schinchimurra of Prester John, that hath a horne in themidst of her posteriores, albeit not visible to every eye.

  • 马奔牛 08-07

       After great consultation with Kindred and Friends, the match wasagreed upon, to the no little joy of Gianetta, who devoutly returnedinfinite thankes to heaven, for so mercifully respecting herdejected poore estate, after the bitter passage of so many miseries,and never tearming her selfe any otherwise, but the daughter of apoore Piccard. Soone was the yong Gentleman recovered and married,no man alive so well contented as he, and setting downe an absolutedetermination, to lead a loving life with his Gianetta.

  • 斯托克顿市 08-05

    {  There dwelt sometime in Arezzo (which is a faire Village of Tuscany)a rich man, named Tofano, who enjoyed in marriage a young beautifullwoman, called Cheta: of whom (without any occasion given, or reasonknowne to himselfe) he became exceeding- jealous. Which his wifeperceyving, she grew much offended thereat, and tooke it in greatscorne, that she should be servile to so vile and slavish a condition.Oftentimes, she demanded of him, from whence this jealousie in himreceived originall, he having never seene or heard of any; he couldmake her no other answer, but who his owne bad humour suggested, anddrove him every day (almost) to deaths doore, by feare of that whichno way needed. But, whether as a just scourge for this his grossefolly, or a secret decree, ordained to him by Fortune and the Fates, Iam not able to distinguish: It came so to passe, that a youngGallant made meanes to enjoy her favour, and she was so discreetlywise in judging of his worthinesse; that affection passed so farremutually betweene them, as nothing wanted, but effects to answerewords, suited with time and place convenient, for which order wastaken as best they might, yet to stand free from all suspition.

  • 亨利 08-05

      Faire Grizelda, if I make you my wife, will you doe your bestendeavour to please me, in all things which I shall doe or say? willyou also be gentle, humble, and patient? with divers other the likequestions: whereto she still answered, that she would, so neere asheaven (with grace) should enable her.

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