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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:宋爱荣 大小:j9f3mZrD88366KB 下载:aec8vo3C92975次
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日期:2020-08-03 18:33:28
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Stranger," replied Eumaeus, "as regards your question: sit still,make yourself comfortable, drink your wine, and listen to me. Thenights are now at their longest; there is plenty of time both forsleeping and sitting up talking together; you ought not to go to bedtill bed time, too much sleep is as bad as too little; if any one ofthe others wishes to go to bed let him leave us and do so; he can thentake my master's pigs out when he has done breakfast in the morning.We two will sit here eating and drinking in the hut, and telling oneanother stories about our misfortunes; for when a man has sufferedmuch, and been buffeted about in the world, he takes pleasure inrecalling the memory of sorrows that have long gone by. As regardsyour question, then, my tale is as follows:
2.  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."
3.  "'Ulysses,' he answered, 'noble son of Laertes, was not lost atsea in any storm of Neptune's raising, nor did my foes despatch meupon the mainland, but Aegisthus and my wicked wife were the deathof me between them. He asked me to his house, feasted me, and thenbutchered me most miserably as though I were a fat beast in aslaughter house, while all around me my comrades were slain like sheepor pigs for the wedding breakfast, or picnic, or gorgeous banquet ofsome great nobleman. You must have seen numbers of men killed eitherin a general engagement, or in single combat, but you never sawanything so truly pitiable as the way in which we fell in thatcloister, with the mixing-bowl and the loaded tables lying allabout, and the ground reeking with our-blood. I heard Priam's daughterCassandra scream as Clytemnestra killed her close beside me. I laydying upon the earth with the sword in my body, and raised my hands tokill the slut of a murderess, but she slipped away from me; shewould not even close my lips nor my eyes when I was dying, for thereis nothing in this world so cruel and so shameless as a woman when shehas fallen into such guilt as hers was. Fancy murdering her ownhusband! I thought I was going to be welcomed home by my childrenand my servants, but her abominable crime has brought disgrace onherself and all women who shall come after- even on the good ones.'
4.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."
5.  As he thus prayed, Minerva came close up to him in the likenessand with the voice of Mentor. "Telemachus," said she, "if you are madeof the same stuff as your father you will be neither fool nor cowardhenceforward, for Ulysses never broke his word nor left his workhalf done. If, then, you take after him, your voyage will not befruitless, but unless you have the blood of Ulysses and of Penelope inyour veins I see no likelihood of your succeeding. Sons are seldomas good men as their fathers; they are generally worse, not better;still, as you are not going to be either fool or cowardhenceforward, and are not entirely without some share of your father'swise discernment, I look with hope upon your undertaking. But mind younever make common cause with any of those foolish suitors, for theyhave neither sense nor virtue, and give no thought to death and to thedoom that will shortly fall on one and all of them, so that they shallperish on the same day. As for your voyage, it shall not be longdelayed; your father was such an old friend of mine that I will findyou a ship, and will come with you myself. Now, however, returnhome, and go about among the suitors; begin getting provisions readyfor your voyage; see everything well stowed, the wine in jars, and thebarley meal, which is the staff of life, in leathern bags, while Igo round the town and beat up volunteers at once. There are many shipsin Ithaca both old and new; I will run my eye over them for you andwill choose the best; we will get her ready and will put out to seawithout delay."
6.  "Hear me," he cried, "you god who visited me yesterday, and bademe sail the seas in search of my father who has so long beenmissing. I would obey you, but the Achaeans, and more particularly thewicked suitors, are hindering me that I cannot do so."

计划指导

1.  Then Dolius put out both his hands and went up to Ulysses. "Sir,"said he, seizing his master's hand and kissing it at the wrist, "wehave long been wishing you home: and now heaven has restored you to usafter we had given up hoping. All hail, therefore, and may the godsprosper you. But tell me, does Penelope already know of your return,or shall we send some one to tell her?"
2.  Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."
3.  While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.
4.  As he was speaking a bird flew by upon his right hand- a hawk,Apollo's messenger. It held a dove in its talons, and the feathers, asit tore them off, fell to the ground midway between Telemachus and theship. On this Theoclymenus called him apart and caught him by thehand. "Telemachus," said he, "that bird did not fly on your right handwithout having been sent there by some god. As soon as I saw it I knewit was an omen; it means that you will remain powerful and thatthere will be no house in Ithaca more royal than your own."
5.  On this they hurried off on their several errands. The heifer wasbrought in from the plain, and Telemachus's crew came from the ship;the goldsmith brought the anvil, hammer, and tongs, with which heworked his gold, and Minerva herself came to the sacrifice. Nestorgave out the gold, and the smith gilded the horns of the heifer thatthe goddess might have pleasure in their beauty. Then Stratius andEchephron brought her in by the horns; Aretus fetched water from thehouse in a ewer that had a flower pattern on it, and in his other handhe held a basket of barley meal; sturdy Thrasymedes stood by with asharp axe, ready to strike the heifer, while Perseus held a bucket.Then Nestor began with washing his hands and sprinkling the barleymeal, and he offered many a prayer to Minerva as he threw a lockfrom the heifer's head upon the fire.
6.  Then Penelope's heart sank within her, and for a long time she wasspeechless; her eyes filled with tears, and she could find noutterance. At last, however, she said, "Why did my son leave me?What business had he to go sailing off in ships that make long voyagesover the ocean like sea-horses? Does he want to die without leavingany one behind him to keep up his name?"

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1.  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."
2.  Thus he spoke, and Mercury, guide and guardian, slayer of Argus, didas he was told. Forthwith he bound on his glittering golden sandalswith which he could fly like the wind over land and sea. He took thewand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just ashe pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then heswooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of thesea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishingevery hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage inthe spray. He flew and flew over many a weary wave, but when at lasthe got to the island which was his journey's end, he left the seaand went on by land till he came to the cave where the nymph Calypsolived.
3.  "This was what she said, and we assented; whereon we could see herworking on her great web all day long, but at night she would unpickthe stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us in this way forthree years and we never found her out, but as time wore on and shewas now in her fourth year, one of her maids who knew what she wasdoing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work, soshe had to finish it whether she would or no. The suitors,therefore, make you this answer, that both you and the Achaeans mayunderstand-'Send your mother away, and bid her marry the man of herown and of her father's choice'; for I do not know what will happen ifshe goes on plaguing us much longer with the airs she gives herself onthe score of the accomplishments Minerva has taught her, and becauseshe is so clever. We never yet heard of such a woman; we know allabout Tyro, Alcmena, Mycene, and the famous women of old, but theywere nothing to your mother, any one of them. It was not fair of herto treat us in that way, and as long as she continues in the mind withwhich heaven has now endowed her, so long shall we go on eating upyour estate; and I do not see why she should change, for she getsall the honour and glory, and it is you who pay for it, not she.Understand, then, that we will not go back to our lands, neitherhere nor elsewhere, till she has made her choice and married someone or other of us."
4.  As he spoke he sat down, and Telemachus threw his arms about hisfather and wept. They were both so much moved that they cried aloudlike eagles or vultures with crooked talons that have been robbed oftheir half fledged young by peasants. Thus piteously did they weep,and the sun would have gone down upon their mourning if Telemachus hadnot suddenly said, "In what ship, my dear father, did your crewbring you to Ithaca? Of what nation did they declare themselves to be-for you cannot have come by land?"
5.   On this Minerva came close up to him and said, "Son of Arceisius-best friend I have in the world- pray to the blue-eyed damsel, andto Jove her father; then poise your spear and hurl it."
6.  Now the night came on stormy and very dark, for there was no moon.It poured without ceasing, and the wind blew strong from the West,which is a wet quarter, so Ulysses thought he would see whetherEumaeus, in the excellent care he took of him, would take off hisown cloak and give it him, or make one of his men give him one."Listen to me," said he, "Eumaeus and the rest of you; when I havesaid a prayer I will tell you something. It is the wine that makesme talk in this way; wine will make even a wise man fall to singing;it will make him chuckle and dance and say many a word that he hadbetter leave unspoken; still, as I have begun, I will go on. Wouldthat I were still young and strong as when we got up an ambuscadebefore Troy. Menelaus and Ulysses were the leaders, but I was incommand also, for the other two would have it so. When we had comeup to the wall of the city we crouched down beneath our armour and laythere under cover of the reeds and thick brush-wood that grew aboutthe swamp. It came on to freeze with a North wind blowing; the snowfell small and fine like hoar frost, and our shields were coated thickwith rime. The others had all got cloaks and shirts, and sleptcomfortably enough with their shields about their shoulders, but I hadcarelessly left my cloak behind me, not thinking that I should betoo cold, and had gone off in nothing but my shirt and shield. Whenthe night was two-thirds through and the stars had shifted their theirplaces, I nudged Ulysses who was close to me with my elbow, and heat once gave me his ear.

应用

1.  "'Stranger,' said she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you. Aboutthe time when the sun shall have reached mid heaven, the old man ofthe sea comes up from under the waves, heralded by the West windthat furs the water over his head. As soon as he has come up he liesdown, and goes to sleep in a great sea cave, where the seals-Halosydne's chickens as they call them- come up also from the greysea, and go to sleep in shoals all round him; and a very strong andfish-like smell do they bring with them. Early to-morrow morning Iwill take you to this place and will lay you in ambush. Pick out,therefore, the three best men you have in your fleet, and I willtell you all the tricks that the old man will play you.
2.  She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then going upstairs with her handmaids into her room, shemourned her dear husband till Minerva sent sweet sleep over hereyelids.
3.  Then they stood on one side and went to tell the girl, while Ulysseswashed himself in the stream and scrubbed the brine from his backand from his broad shoulders. When he had thoroughly washed himself,and had got the brine out of his hair, he anointed himself with oil,and put on the clothes which the girl had given him; Minerva then madehim look taller and stronger than before, she also made the hairgrow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders as askilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan andMinerva enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it- and his workis full of beauty. Then he went and sat down a little way off upon thebeach, looking quite young and handsome, and the girl gazed on himwith admiration; then she said to her maids:
4、  And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."
5、  His son, Theoclymenus, it was who now came up to Telemachus as hewas making drink-offerings and praying in his ship. "Friend'" said he,"now that I find you sacrificing in this place, I beseech you byyour sacrifices themselves, and by the god to whom you make them, Ipray you also by your own head and by those of your followers, tell methe truth and nothing but the truth. Who and whence are you? Tell mealso of your town and parents."

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  • 卫绍琴 08-02

      "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.

  • 陈小亮 08-02

      "Cease your weeping, lest some one should come outside and see us,and tell those who a are within. When you go in, do so separately, notboth together; I will go first, and do you follow afterwards; Let thismoreover be the token between us; the suitors will all of them tryto prevent me from getting hold of the bow and quiver; do you,therefore, Eumaeus, place it in my hands when you are carrying itabout, and tell the women to close the doors of their apartment. Ifthey hear any groaning or uproar as of men fighting about the house,they must not come out; they must keep quiet, and stay where theyare at their work. And I charge you, Philoetius, to make fast thedoors of the outer court, and to bind them securely at once."

  • 杰尔巴 08-02

       "But there! It rests with heaven to determine whether he is toreturn, and take his revenge in his own house or no; I would, however,urge you to set about trying to get rid of these suitors at once. Takemy advice, call the Achaean heroes in assembly to-morrow -lay yourcase before them, and call heaven to bear you witness. Bid the suitorstake themselves off, each to his own place, and if your mother'smind is set on marrying again, let her go back to her father, who willfind her a husband and provide her with all the marriage gifts that sodear a daughter may expect. As for yourself, let me prevail upon youto take the best ship you can get, with a crew of twenty men, and goin quest of your father who has so long been missing. Some one maytell you something, or (and people often hear things in this way) someheaven-sent message may direct you. First go to Pylos and askNestor; thence go on to Sparta and visit Menelaus, for he got homelast of all the Achaeans; if you hear that your father is alive and onhis way home, you can put up with the waste these suitors will makefor yet another twelve months. If on the other hand you hear of hisdeath, come home at once, celebrate his funeral rites with all duepomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make your mother marryagain. Then, having done all this, think it well over in your mindhow, by fair means or foul, you may kill these suitors in your ownhouse. You are too old to plead infancy any longer; have you not heardhow people are singing Orestes' praises for having killed his father'smurderer Aegisthus? You are a fine, smart looking fellow; show yourmettle, then, and make yourself a name in story. Now, however, Imust go back to my ship and to my crew, who will be impatient if Ikeep them waiting longer; think the matter over for yourself, andremember what I have said to you."

  • 司迎宾 08-02

      Then Minerva left Scheria and went away over the sea. She went toMarathon and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she enteredthe abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous,and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching thethreshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like thatof the sun or moon. The walls on either side were of bronze from endto end, and the cornice was of blue enamel. The doors were gold, andhung on pillars of silver that rose from a floor of bronze, whilethe lintel was silver and the hook of the door was of gold.

  • 徐凯 08-01

    {  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."

  • 王少武 07-31

      Thus did Ulysses sleep, and the young men slept beside him. Butthe swineherd did not like sleeping away from his pigs, so he gotready to go and Ulysses was glad to see that he looked after hisproperty during his master's absence. First he slung his sword overhis brawny shoulders and put on a thick cloak to keep out the wind. Healso took the skin of a large and well fed goat, and a javelin in caseof attack from men or dogs. Thus equipped he went to his rest wherethe pigs were camping under an overhanging rock that gave them shelterfrom the North wind.}

  • 邵杨 07-31

      "'My friends,' said I, 'we have meat and drink in the ship, let usmind, therefore, and not touch the cattle, or we shall suffer forit; for these cattle and sheep belong to the mighty sun, who seesand gives ear to everything. And again they promised that they wouldobey.

  • 保罗·克拉克 07-31

      With this he got up and made a bed for Ulysses by throwing somegoatskins and sheepskins on the ground in front of the fire. HereUlysses lay down, and Eumaeus covered him over with a great heavycloak that he kept for a change in case of extraordinarily badweather.

  • 胡玉梅 07-30

       "My friend," answered Nestor, "you recall a time of much sorrow tomy mind, for the brave Achaeans suffered much both at sea, whileprivateering under Achilles, and when fighting before the great cityof king Priam. Our best men all of them fell there- Ajax, Achilles,Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, aman singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant. But we sufferedmuch more than this; what mortal tongue indeed could tell the wholestory? Though you were to stay here and question me for five years, oreven six, I could not tell you all that the Achaeans suffered, and youwould turn homeward weary of my tale before it ended. Nine longyears did we try every kind of stratagem, but the hand of heaven wasagainst us; during all this time there was no one who could comparewith your father in subtlety- if indeed you are his son- I canhardly believe my eyes- and you talk just like him too- no one wouldsay that people of such different ages could speak so much alike. Heand I never had any kind of difference from first to last neither incamp nor council, but in singleness of heart and purpose we advisedthe Argives how all might be ordered for the best.

  • 裴伟 07-28

    {  "I spoke comfortingly to them and said, 'We must draw our ship on tothe land, and hide the ship's gear with all our property in some cave;then come with me all of you as fast as you can to Circe's house,where you will find your comrades eating and drinking in the midstof great abundance.'

  • 肖某德 07-28

      To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible,well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove givesprosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must takewhat he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now,however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not wantfor clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress mayreasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and willtell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I amdaughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."

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