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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:安东尼·詹金斯 大小:KB6myfaZ79406KB 下载:jkmWRhyu64237次
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日期:2020-08-10 21:39:15
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汪光法

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When Eumaeus heard this he went straight to Ulysses and said,"Father stranger, my mistress Penelope, mother of Telemachus, has sentfor you; she is in great grief, but she wishes to hear anything youcan tell her about her husband, and if she is satisfied that you arespeaking the truth, she will give you a shirt and cloak, which are thevery things that you are most in want of. As for bread, you can getenough of that to fill your belly, by begging about the town, andletting those give that will."
2.  On this Minerva came close up to him and said, "Son of Arceisius-best friend I have in the world- pray to the blue-eyed damsel, andto Jove her father; then poise your spear and hurl it."
3.  "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.
4.  "Even so, however, I did not get them away without misadventure.We had with us a certain youth named Elpenor, not very remarkablefor sense or courage, who had got drunk and was lying on the house-topaway from the rest of the men, to sleep off his liquor in the cool.When he heard the noise of the men bustling about, he jumped up on asudden and forgot all about coming down by the main staircase, so hetumbled right off the roof and broke his neck, and his soul wentdown to the house of Hades.
5.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.
6.  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."

计划指导

1.  "I see, sir," said Ulysses, "that you are an excellent gardener-what pains you take with it, to be sure. There is not a singleplant, not a fig tree, vine, olive, pear, nor flower bed, but bearsthe trace of your attention. I trust, however, that you will not beoffended if I say that you take better care of your garden than ofyourself. You are old, unsavoury, and very meanly clad. It cannot bebecause you are idle that your master takes such poor care of you,indeed your face and figure have nothing of the slave about them,and proclaim you of noble birth. I should have said that you wereone of those who should wash well, eat well, and lie soft at nightas old men have a right to do; but tell me, and tell me true, whosebondman are you, and in whose garden are you working? Tell me alsoabout another matter. Is this place that I have come to really Ithaca?I met a man just now who said so, but he was a dull fellow, and hadnot the patience to hear my story out when I was asking him about anold friend of mine, whether he was still living, or was already deadand in the house of Hades. Believe me when I tell you that this mancame to my house once when I was in my own country and never yet didany stranger come to me whom I liked better. He said that his familycame from Ithaca and that his father was Laertes, son of Arceisius.I received him hospitably, making him welcome to all the abundanceof my house, and when he went away I gave him all customarypresents. I gave him seven talents of fine gold, and a cup of solidsilver with flowers chased upon it. I gave him twelve light cloaks,and as many pieces of tapestry; I also gave him twelve cloaks ofsingle fold, twelve rugs, twelve fair mantles, and an equal numberof shirts. To all this I added four good looking women skilled inall useful arts, and I let him take his choice."
2.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
3.  "When I had said this she went straight through the court with herwand in her hand and opened the pigsty doors. My men came out likeso many prime hogs and stood looking at her, but she went aboutamong them and anointed each with a second drug, whereon thebristles that the bad drug had given them fell off, and they becamemen again, younger than they were before, and much taller and betterlooking. They knew me at once, seized me each of them by the hand, andwept for joy till the whole house was filled with the sound of theirhullabalooing, and Circe herself was so sorry for them that she cameup to me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, go back at onceto the sea where you have left your ship, and first draw it on tothe land. Then, hide all your ship's gear and property in some cave,and come back here with your men.'
4.  "I lent it him," answered Noemon, "what else could I do when a manof his position said he was in a difficulty, and asked me to obligehim? I could not possibly refuse. As for those who went with himthey were the best young men we have, and I saw Mentor go on boardas captain- or some god who was exactly like him. I cannotunderstand it, for I saw Mentor here myself yesterday morning, and yethe was then setting out for Pylos."
5.  Here poor Ulysses would have certainly perished even in spite of hisown destiny, if Minerva had not helped him to keep his wits about him.He swam seaward again, beyond reach of the surf that was beatingagainst the land, and at the same time he kept looking towards theshore to see if he could find some haven, or a spit that should takethe waves aslant. By and by, as he swam on, he came to the mouth ofa river, and here he thought would be the best place, for there wereno rocks, and it afforded shelter from the wind. He felt that therewas a current, so he prayed inwardly and said:
6.  The king was delighted at this, and exclaimed to the Phaecians"Aldermen and town councillors, our guest seems to be a person ofsingular judgement; let us give him such proof of our hospitality ashe may reasonably expect. There are twelve chief men among you, andcounting myself there are thirteen; contribute, each of you, a cleancloak, a shirt, and a talent of fine gold; let us give him all this ina lump down at once, so that when he gets his supper he may do so witha light heart. As for Euryalus he will have to make a formal apologyand a present too, for he has been rude."

推荐功能

1.  Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."
2.  "This may not be, Agelaus," answered Melanthius, "the mouth of thenarrow passage is dangerously near the entrance to the outer court.One brave man could prevent any number from getting in. But I knowwhat I will do, I will bring you arms from the store room, for I amsure it is there that Ulysses and his son have put them."
3.  Then she went back to Olympus; but Telemachus stirred Pisistratuswith his heel to rouse him, and said, "Wake up Pisistratus, and yokethe horses to the chariot, for we must set off home."
4.  "My friend," said he, "you are the first person whom I have met within this country; I salute you, therefore, and beg you to be willdisposed towards me. Protect these my goods, and myself too, for Iembrace your knees and pray to you as though you were a god. Tellme, then, and tell me truly, what land and country is this? Who areits inhabitants? Am I on an island, or is this the sea board of somecontinent?"
5.   "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."
6.  When the servants had washed them and anointed them with oil, theybrought them woollen cloaks and shirts, and the two took their seatsby the side of Menelaus. A maidservant brought them water in abeautiful golden ewer, and poured it into a silver basin for them towash their hands; and she drew a clean table beside them. An upperservant brought them bread, and offered them many good things ofwhat there was in the house, while the carver fetched them plates ofall manner of meats and set cups of gold by their side.

应用

1.  "Pray do not scold her," replied Ulysses; "she is not to blame.She did tell me to follow along with the maids, but I was ashamedand afraid, for I thought you might perhaps be displeased if you sawme. Every human being is sometimes a little suspicious and irritable."
2.  "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.
3.  "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."
4、  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, I do not want to stay here; a beggar canalways do better in town than country, for any one who likes cangive him something. I am too old to care about remaining here at thebeck and call of a master. Therefore let this man do as you havejust told him, and take me to the town as soon as I have had a warm bythe fire, and the day has got a little heat in it. My clothes arewretchedly thin, and this frosty morning I shall be perished withcold, for you say the city is some way off."
5、  BOOK V.

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  • 梁豪谭 08-09

      MEANWHILE Ulysses and the swineherd had lit a fire in the hut andwere were getting breakfast ready at daybreak for they had sent themen out with the pigs. When Telemachus came up, the dogs did not bark,but fawned upon him, so Ulysses, hearing the sound of feet andnoticing that the dogs did not bark, said to Eumaeus:

  • 陈立民 08-09

      "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."

  • 约翰·安德森 08-09

       "'Then,' said they, 'if no man is attacking you, you must be ill;when Jove makes people ill, there is no help for it, and you hadbetter pray to your father Neptune.'

  • 于淼 08-09

      Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."

  • 李先忠 08-08

    {  "Stranger, I should like to speak with you briefly about anothermatter. It is indeed nearly bed time- for those, at least, who cansleep in spite of sorrow. As for myself, heaven has given me a life ofsuch unmeasurable woe, that even by day when I am attending to myduties and looking after the servants, I am still weeping andlamenting during the whole time; then, when night comes, and we all ofus go to bed, I lie awake thinking, and my heart comes a prey to themost incessant and cruel tortures. As the dun nightingale, daughter ofPandareus, sings in the early spring from her seat in shadiestcovert hid, and with many a plaintive trill pours out the tale howby mishap she killed her own child Itylus, son of king Zethus, even sodoes my mind toss and turn in its uncertainty whether I ought tostay with my son here, and safeguard my substance, my bondsmen, andthe greatness of my house, out of regard to public opinion and thememory of my late husband, or whether it is not now time for me togo with the best of these suitors who are wooing me and making me suchmagnificent presents. As long as my son was still young, and unable tounderstand, he would not hear of my leaving my husband's house, butnow that he is full grown he begs and prays me to do so, beingincensed at the way in which the suitors are eating up his property.Listen, then, to a dream that I have had and interpret it for me ifyou can. I have twenty geese about the house that eat mash out of atrough, and of which I am exceedingly fond. I dreamed that a greateagle came swooping down from a mountain, and dug his curved beak intothe neck of each of them till he had killed them all. Presently hesoared off into the sky, and left them lying dead about the yard;whereon I wept in my room till all my maids gathered round me, sopiteously was I grieving because the eagle had killed my geese. Thenhe came back again, and perching on a projecting rafter spoke to mewith human voice, and told me to leave off crying. 'Be of goodcourage,' he said, 'daughter of Icarius; this is no dream, but avision of good omen that shall surely come to pass. The geese arethe suitors, and I am no longer an eagle, but your own husband, who amcome back to you, and who will bring these suitors to a disgracefulend.' On this I woke, and when I looked out I saw my geese at thetrough eating their mash as usual."

  • 温连光 08-07

      Their hearts sank as they heard him, but Eurymachus again spokesaying:}

  • 黄康春 08-07

      Then the other maids in the house rose and lit the fire on thehearth; Telemachus also rose and put on his clothes. He girded hissword about his shoulder, bound his sandals on his comely feet, andtook a doughty spear with a point of sharpened bronze; then he went tothe threshold of the cloister and said to Euryclea, "Nurse, did youmake the stranger comfortable both as regards bed and board, or didyou let him shift for himself?- for my mother, good woman though sheis, has a way of paying great attention to second-rate people, andof neglecting others who are in reality much better men."

  • 冯开全 08-07

      Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:

  • 姜仁浩 08-06

       "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."

  • 陈静租 08-04

    {  Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

  • 金敬道 08-04

      Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."

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