0 街机捕鱼可下分-APP安装下载

街机捕鱼可下分 注册最新版下载

街机捕鱼可下分 注册

街机捕鱼可下分注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张明春 大小:usk1uPui57910KB 下载:uDZGjKfC21950次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:F66Q3q5m77552条
日期:2020-08-10 02:26:11
安卓
陈良锦

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When Manutio had ended the Song, the King demanded of him, whencethis Song came, because he had never heard it before? My graciousLord, answered Manutio, it must needes seeme straunge to your Majesty,because it is not fully three dayes, since it was invented, made,and set to the note. Then the King asked, whom it concerned? Sir(quoth Manutio) I dare not disclose that to any but onely yourselfe. Which answer made the King much more desirous, and beingrisen from the Table, he tooke him into his Bedchamber, whereManutio related all at large to him, according to the trust reposed inhim. Wherwith the King was wonderfully well pleased, greatlycommending the courage of the Maide, and said, that a Virgin of such avaliant spirit, did well deserve to have her case commiserated: andcommanded him also, to goe (as sent from him) and comfort her, withpromise, that the very same day, in the evening, he would not faile tocome and see her.
2.  A physitians wife laide a Lover of her Maides (supposing him to bedead) in a Chest, by reason that he had drunke Water, which usuallywas given to procure a sleepy entrancing. Two Lombard usurers,stealing the Chest, in hope of a rich booty, carryed it into theirowne house, where afterward the man awaking, was apprehended for aTheefe. The Chamber-maide to the Physitians wife, going before thebench of Justice, accuseth her selfe for putting the imagined deadbody into the Chest, by which meanes he escapeth hanging. And thetheeves which stole away the Chest, were condemned to pay a greatsumme of money.
3.  As shee grew in stature, so she did in beauty and vertuousqualities, as none was more commended throughout the whole City, forfaire, civill, and honest demeanour, which incited many amorously toaffect her. But (above all the rest) two very honest young men, ofgood fame and repute, who were so equally in love addicted to her,that being. jealous of each others fortune, in preventing of theirseverall hopefull expectation; a deadly hatred grew suddenlybetweene them, the one being named Giovanni de Severino, and the otherMenghino de Minghole. Either of these two young men, before theMaide was fifteene yeeres old, laboured to be possessed of her inmarriage, but her Guardian would give no consent thereto: wherefore,perceiving their honest intended meaning to be frustrated, they nowbegan to busie their braines, how to forestall one another by craftand circumvention.
4.  Seven times she rehearsed the charme to the Image, looking stillwhen the two Ladies would appeare in their likenesse, and so longshe held on her imprecations (feeling greater cold, then willinglieshe would have done) that breake of day began to shew it selfe, andhalfe despairing of the Ladies comming, according as the Schollerbad promised, she said to her selfe: I much misdoubt, that Renierohath quitted me with such another peece of night-service, as it was mylucke to bestow on him: but if he have done it in that respect, heewas but ill advised in his revenge, because the night wants nowthree parts of the length, as then it had: and the cold which hesuffered, was far superior in quality to mine, albeit it is more sharpnow in the morning, then all the time of night it hath bin.
5.  Now was the Sun upon his setting, when the poore honest country-man,because darke night should not overtake them, conducted the Ladyhome to his owne house: and gaining the assistance of his two brethrenand wife, setting the waiting-woman in a Chaire, thither theybrought her in like manner. And questionles, there wanted no diligenceand comfortable language, to pacifie the Ladyes continualllamentations. The good wife, led the Lady into hir own poorelodging, where (such cates as they had to feede on) lovingly she setbefore her: conveying her afterward into her owne bed, and taking suchgood order, that Ancilla was carried in the night time to Florence, toprevent all further ensuing danger, by reason of her legs breaking.
6.  If gallant youth

计划指导

1.  These words were not a little welcome to my Lord Abbot, because(thereby) he halfe assured himselfe, that Fortune had laid open thepath to his hoped pleasures. Whereupon he said. Deare daughter, I makeno question to the contrary, but it must needes be an exceedinginfelicity, to so faire and goodly a young woman as you are, to beplagued with so sottish an husband, brainsick, and without the useof common understanding; but yet subject to a more hellishaffliction then all these, namely jealousie, and therefore you beingin this wofull manner tormented, your tribulations are not only somuch the more credited, but also as amply grieved for, and pittied. Inwhich heavy and irksome perturbations, I see not any meanes of remedy,but onely one, being a kinde of physicke (beyond all other) to curehim of his foolish jealousie; which medicine is very familiar to me,because I know best how to compound it, alwayes provided, that you canbe of so strong a capacity, as to be secret in what I shall say untoyou.
2.  When she saw that this domesticke disquietnesse returned her nobenefit, but rather tended to her own consumption, then anyamendment in her miserable Husband, shee began thus to conferre withher private thoughts. This Husband of mine liveth with me, as if hewere no Husband, or I his Wife; the marriage bed, which should be acomfort to us both, seemeth hatefull to him, and as little pleasing tomee, because his minde is on his money, his head busied with worldlycogitations, and early and late in his counting-house, admitting nofamiliar conversation with me. Why should not I be as respectlesseof him, as he declares him selfe to be of me? I tooke him for anHusband, brought him a good and sufficient Dowry, thinking him to beman, and affected a woman as a man ought to doe, else he had neverbeene any Husband of mine. If he be a Woman hater, why did he makechoice of me to be his Wife? If I had not intended to be of the World,I could have coopt my selfe up in a Cloyster, and shorne my selfe aNunne, but that I was not born to such severity of life. My youthshall be blasted with age before I can truly understand what youth is,and I shall be branded with the disgraceful word barrennesse,knowing my selfe meete and able to be a Mother, were my Husband butwort the name of a Father, or expected issue and posterity, to leaveour memoriall to after times in our race, as all our predecessoursformerly have done, and for which mariage was chiefly instituted.Castles long besieged, doe yeeld at the last, and women wronged bytheir owne husbands, can hardly warrant their owne frailety,especially living among so many temptations, which flesh and bloud arenot alwaies able to resist. Well, I meane to be advised in thiscase, before I will hazard my honest reputation, either to suspitionor scandall, then which, no woman can have two heavier enemies, andvery few there are that can escape them.
3.  Admit (myracle of Ladies) that I should die in this distresse: Alas,my death would be but your dishonour; I cannot be termed mine ownemurtherer, when the Dart came from your eye that did it, and mustremaine a witnes of your rigor. You cannot then chuse but call tominde, and say within your own soule: Alas, what a sinne have Icommitted, in being so unmercifull to my Magnifico. Repentance thenserves to no purpose, but you must answer for such unkinde cruelty.Wherefore, to prevent so blacke a scandall to your bright beauty,beside the ceaselesse acclamations, which will dog your walkes inthe day time, and breake your quiet sleepes in the night season,with fearefull sights and gastly apparitions, hovering and hauntingabout your bed; let all these moove you to milde mercy, and spillnot life, when you may save it.
4.  Andreana, although her soule was extraordinarily sorrowfull, andteares flowed abundantly from her eyes; yet she listned attentively tohir maids counsell; allowing her first advice against desperation,to be truly good; but to the rest thus she replyed. God forbid(quoth she) that I should suffer so deere a loving friend, as hehath alwayes shewed himselfe to me; nay, which is much more, myhusband; by sacred and solemne vowes passed betweene us, to be putinto the ground basely, and like a dog, or else to be left in the openstreet. He hath had the sacrifice of my virgin teares, and if I canprevaile, he shall have some of his kindreds, as I have instantlydevised, what (in this hard case) is best to be done. Forthwith shesent the maid to her Chamber, for divers elles of white Damaskelying in her Chest, which when she had brought, they spread itabroad on the grasse, even in the manner of a winding sheete, andtherein wrapped the body of Gabriello, with a faire wrought pillowunder his head, having first (with their teares) closed his mouthand eyes, and placed a Chaplet of Flowers on his head, covering thewhole shrowd over in the same manner; which being done, thus she spaketo her Maid.
5.  The Judge hearing these words, was overcome with exceeding griefe,and when she was silent, thus he began. Alas deare Love, what ananswere is this? Hast thou no regard of thine owne honor, thy Parents,and friends? Canst thou rather affect to abide here, for the pleasuresof this man, and so sin capitolly, then to live at Pisa in the stateof my wife? Consider deare heart, when this man shall waxe weary ofthee, to thy shame and his owne disgrace, he will reject thee. Imust and shall love thee for ever, and when I dye, I leave thee Ladyand commandresse of all that is mine. Can an inordinate appetite,cause thee to be carelesse of thine honour, and of him that loves theeas his owne life? Alas, my fairest hope, say no more so, but returnehome with me, and now that I am acquainted with thy inclination; Iwill endeavour heereafter to give thee better contentment. Wherefore(deare heart) doe not denie me, but change thy minde, and goe with me,for I never saw merry day since I lost thee.Sir (quoth she) I desire no body to have care of mine honour,beside my selfe, because it cannot be here abused. And as for myParents, what respect had they of me, when they made me your wife?If then they could be so carelesse of mee, what reason have I toregard them now? And whereas you taxe me, that I cannot live herewithout capitall sin; farre is the thought thereof from me: for,here I am regarded as the wife of Pagamino, but at Pisa, you reputedme not worthy your society: because, by the point of the Moone, andthe quadratures of Geometrie; the Planets held conjunction betweeneyou and me, whereas here I am subject to no such constellations. Yousay beside, that hereafter you will strive to give me bettercontentment then you have done; surely, in mine opinion it is no waypossible, because our complexions are so farre different, as yce isfrom fire, or gold from drosse. As for your allegation, of thisGentlemans rejecting me, when his humour is satisfied; should it proveto be so (as it is the least part of my feare) what fortune soevershall betide me, never will I make any meanes to you, what miseries ormisadventures may happen to me; but the world will affoord me oneresting place or other, and more to my contentment, then if I werewith you. Therefore I tell you once againe, to live secured from alloffence to holy Saints, and not to injure their feasts, fasts,vigills, and other ceremonious seasons: here is my demourance, andfrom hence I purpose not to part.
6.  Madame Francesca, a Widdow of Pistoya, being affected by twoFlorentine Gentlemen, the one named Rinuccio Palermini, and theother Alessandro Chiarmontesi, and she bearing no good will toeyther of them; ingeniously freed her selfe from both theirimportunate suites. One of them she caused to lye as dead in agrave, and the other to fetch him from thence: so neither of themaccomplishing what they were enjoyned, fayled of obtaining his hopedexpectation.

推荐功能

1.  A lustie youthfull Priest of Varlungo, fell in love with a prettywoman, named Monna Belcolore. To compasse his amorous desire, heelefte his Cloake (as a pledge of further payment) with her. By asubtile sleight afterward, he made meanes to borrow a Morter of her,which when hee sent home againe in the presence of her Husband; hedemaunded to have his Cloake sent him, as having left it in pawnefor the Morter. To pacifie her Husband, offended that shee did notlend the Priest the Morter without a pawne: she sent him backe hisCloake againe, albeit greatly against her will.
2.  About some three or foure nights after, Meucio being fast asleepe inhis bed, the ghoste of Tingoccio appeared to him, and called soloude that Meucio awaking, demanded who called him? I am thy friendTingoccio, replied the ghoste, who according to my former promisemade, am come again in vision to thee, to tell thee tidings out of thenether world. Meucio was a while somewhat amazed: but, recollectinghis more manly spirits together, boldly he said. My brother andfriend, thou art heartily welcome: but I thought thou hadst beeneutterly lost. Those things (quoth Tingoccio) are lost, which cannot berecovered againe, and if I were lost, how could I then be heere withthee? Alas Tingoccio, replyed Meucio, my meaning is not so: but Iwould be resolved, whether thou art among the damned soules, in thepainefull fire of hell torments, or no? No (quoth Tingoccio) I amnot sent thither, but for divers sinnes by mee committed I am tosuffer very great and grievous paines. Then Meucio demaundedparticularly, the punishments inflicted there, for the severall sinnescommitted heere: Wherein Tingoccio fully resolved him. And uponfurther question, what hee would have to be done for him here, madeanswere, That Meucio should cause Masses, Prayers and Almes-deeds tobe performed for him, which (he said) were very helpefull to thesoules abiding there, and Meucio promised to see them done.
3.  What can now be saide to the contrary, but that poore CountryCottages, may yeeld as divine and excellent spirits, as the moststately and Royall mansions, which breed and bring uppe some, moreworthy to be Hog-rubbers, then hold any soveraignty over men? Where isany other (beside Grizelda) who not only without a wet eye, butimboldned by a valiant and invincible courage: that can suffer thesharpe rigors, and (never the like heard of proofes) made by theMarquesse? Perhaps he might have met with another, who would havequitted him in a contrary kinde, and for thrusting her forth of dooresin her smocke, could have found better succor somewhere else, ratherthen walke so nakedly in the cold streets.
4.  Credulano, being as credulous as his name imported, seemed readyto swoune with sodaine conceit: Alas good wife (quoth he) how hapnedthis? Sit downe sweet Husband said she, and I wil tell you al. Ourchild was sodainly taken with a swouning, wherein I being unskilful,did verily suppose him to be dead, not knowing what to doe, or say. Bygood hap, our Gossip Reynard came in, and taking the childe up inhis armes, said to me. Gossip, this is nothing else but Wormes inthe bellie of the childe, which ascending to the heart, must needskill the child, without all question to the contrary. But be of goodcomfort Gossip, and feare not, for I can charme them in such sort,that they shall all die, and before I depart hence, you shall see yourSon as healthfull as ever. And because the maner of this charm is ofsuch nature, that it required prayer and exorcising in two places atonce: Nurse went up with his Holye Brother into our Pigeon loft, toexercise their devotion there, while we did the like heere. For nonebut the mother of the childe must bee present at such a mystery, norany enter to hinder the operation of the charme; which was thereason of making fast the Chamber doore. You shall see Husband anonthe Childe, which is indifferently recovered in his armes, and ifNurse and his holy Brother were returned from theyr meditations; hesaith, that the charme would then be fully effected: for the childbeginneth to looke chearefull and merry.
5.   Ave Maria (quoth Simonida, crossing her selfe) Alas deareBrethren, I know not what you say, or meane, nor wherein my Husbandshould bee offended, or make any complaint at all of me. Arrigucciohearing this looked on her like a man that had lost his Senses: forwell he remembred, how many cruell blowes he had given her on theface, beside scratches of his nailes, and spurnes of his feet, as alsothe cutting of her haire, the least shew of all which misusage, wasnot now to be seene. Her brethren likewise briefly told her, the wholeeffect of her Husbands speeches, shewing her the thred, and in whatcruell manner he sware hee did beate her. Simonida, turning then toher Husband, and seeming as confounded with amazement, said. How isthis Husband? what doe I heare? would you have me supposed (to yourowne shame and disgrace) to be a bad woman, and your selfe a cruellcurst man, when (on either side) there is no such matter? When wereyou this night heere in the house with mee? Or when should you beatemee, and I not feele nor know it? Beleeve me (sweete heart) allthese are meerely miracles to me.
6.  No true love was worse spent,

应用

1.  Sicurano, upon this answere, was ten times more desirous thenbefore, and saide: If Fortune favoured thee in friendly maner, bythe obtaining of these things: if it may be spoken, tell mee howthou hadst them. My Lord (answered Ambroginolo) these things (withmany more besides) were given me by a Gentlewoman of Geneway, namedMadam Genevra, the wife to one Bernardo Lomellino, in recompence ofone nights lodging with her, and she desired me to keepe them forher sake. Now, the maine reason of my smiling, was the remembranceof her husbands folly, in waging five thousand Duckets of Gold,against one thousand of mine, that I should not obtaine my will of hisWife; which I did, and thereby won the wager. But hee, who betterdeserved to be punished for his folly, then shee, who was but sicke ofall womens disease; returning from Paris to Geneway, caused her tobe slaine, as afterward it was reported by himselfe.
2.  Poore Lady, how strangely was her soule afflicted, hearing theseharsh and unpleasing speeches? Teares flowed aboundantly from herfaire eies, and like tempestuous windes embowelled in the earth, sodid vehement sighes breake mainly from her heart, and after atedious time of silence, she spake in this manner. My Lord andhusband, you have done a most disloyall and damnable deede,misguided by your owne wicked jealous opinion, and not by any justcause given you, to murther so worthy and Noble a Gentleman. I protestunto you upon my soule, which I wish to be confounded in eternallperdition, if ever I were unchaste to your bed, or allowed him anyother favour, but what might well become so honourable a friend. Andseeing my body hath bene made the receptacle for so precious a kindeof foode, as the heart of so valiant and courteous a Knight, such aswas the Noble Guardastagno; never shall any other foode hereafter,have entertainment there, or my selfe live the Wife to so bloody aHusband.
3.  Because I cannot once againe returne;
4、  Neverthelesse, as womens wits are alwayes best upon suddenconstraints, looking forth of her window, and espying her Husbandpreparing to come up: she threw her selfe on her day Couch, speakingthus (earnestly) to Lambertuccio. Sir, if ever you loved mee, andwould have me faithfully to beleeve it, by the instant safety bothof your owne honour, and my life, doe but as I advise you. Forthdraw your Sword, and, with a stearne countenance, threatning death anddestruction: run downe the staires, and when you are beneath, say. Isweare by my best fortunes, although I misse of thee now heere, yetI will be sure to finde thee some where else. And if my Husbandoffer to stay you, or moove any question to you: make no otheranswere, but what you formerly spake in fury. Beside, so soone asyou are mounted on horsebacke, have no further conference with him,upon any occasion whatsoever; to prevent all suspition in him, ofour future intendments.
5、  HONOURABLE PHILSTRATUS: AND CONCERNING SUCH

旧版特色

!

网友评论(uLAwoeky46660))

  • 格萨尔 08-09

      Adalietta, sweetly hugging him in her armes, and melting her selfein kisses, sighes, and teares on his face, said. Well Sir, I will doso much as I am able, in this your most kinde and loving imposition:and when I shall bee compelled to the contrary: yet rest thusconstantly assured, that I will not breake this your charge, so muchas in thought. Praying ever heartily to the heavenly powers, that theywill direct your course home againe to me, before your prefixeddate, or else I shall live in continual languishing. In the knittingup of this woful parting, embracing and kissing either infinittimes, the Lady tooke a Ring from off her finger, and giving it to herhusband, said. If I chaunce to die before I see you againe, rememberme when you looke on this. He receiving the Ring, and bidding allthe rest of his Friends farewell, mounted on horsebacke, and rode awaywel attended.

  • 章汉夫 08-09

      His Subjects beleeving, that he had caused the children to beeslaine, blamed him greatly, thought him to be a most cruell man, anddid highly compassionate the Ladies case: who when shee came incompany of other Gentlewomen, which mourned for their deceassedchildren, would answere nothing else: but that they could not bemore pleasing to her, then they were to the father that begot them.

  • 吕某阳 08-09

       The night being over-past with infinite feares and afrights, andbright day saluting the world againe, with the expence of ninehoures and more, she fell to her former fruitlesse travailes. Beingsomewhat sharply bitten with hunger, because the former day andnight shee had not tasted any foode: shee made therefore a benefitof necessity, and fed on the greene hearbes so well as she could,not without any piercing afflictions, what should become of her inthis extraordinary misery. As shee walked in these pensivemeditations, she saw a Goate enter into a Cave, and (within a whileafter) come forth againe, wandring along thorow the woods. Whereuponshe stayed, and entred where she saw the beast issue foorth, where shefound two young Kids, yeaned (as it seemed) the selfesame day, whichsight was very pleasing to her, and nothing in that distresse couldmore content her.

  • 细川护熙 08-09

      Alas sweet Madame, answered quaking and quivering Reniero, bee thenso favourable to me, as to free me from forth this open Court, wherethere is no shelter or helpe for me, the snow falling still soexceedingly, as a man might easily be more then halfe buried in it:let me but within your doore, and there I will wait your own goodleisure. Alas deare Reniero (answered Helena) I dare not doe it,because the doore maketh such a noyse in the opening, as it will betoo easily heard by my Brother: but I will goe and use such meanes, asshortly hee shall get him gone, and then I dare boldly give youentrance. Doe so good Madame, replyed Reniero, and let there be afaire fire made ready, that when I am within, I may the sooner warmemy selfe; for I am so strangely benummed with colde, as well-neere Iam past all sence of feeling.

  • 范允富 08-08

    {  When the Father had given this cruell sentence, both against hisowne Daughter, and her young Sonne, the servant readier to do evill,then any good, went to the place where his Daughter was kept. Poorecondemned Pedro, (as you have heard) was led whipt to the Gibbet,and passing (as it pleased the Captaines Officers to guide him) by afaire Inne: at the same time were lodged there three chiefe persons ofArminia, whom the King of the Countrey had sent to Rome, asAmbassadours to the Popes Holinesse, to negociate about an importantbusinesse neerely concerning the King and State. Reposing there forsome few dayes, as being much wearied with their journey., andhighly honoured by the Gentlemen of Trapani, especially SigniorAmarigo; these Ambassadours standing in their Chamber window, heardthe wofull lamentations of Pedro in his passage by.

  • 谭显辉 08-07

      The Abbot, being a man of quicke apprehension, perceived instantlyby this answere; that the Monke not onely knew as much as he did,but also had seene (what was intended) that hee should not. Wherefore,finding himselfe to be as faulty as the Monke, and that hee couldnot shame him, but worthily had deserved as much himselfe; pardoninghim, and imposing silence on eithers offence: they convayed thepoore abused Damosell forth of their doores, she purposing (neverafter) to transgresse in the like manner.}

  • 胡锦涛 08-07

      DOTH OFTENTIMES APPEASE THE FURIOUS CHOLLER OF AN

  • 巴德斯利 08-07

      While thus he continued in this extremity, it came to passe, thatthe Husband to Madam Giana fell sicke, and his debility of bodybeing such, as little, or no hope of life remained: he made his lastwill and testament, ordaining thereby, that his Sonne (alreadygrowne to indifferent stature) should be heire to all his Lands andriches, wherein he abounded very greatly. Next unto him, if he chancedto die without a lawfull heire, he substituted his Wife, whom mostdearely he affected, and so departed out of this life. Madam Gianabeing thus left a widdow; as commonly it is the custome of our CityDames, during the Summer season, she went to a house of her owne inthe Countrey, which was somewhat neere to poore Frederigoes Farme, andwhere he lived in such an honest kind of contented poverty.

  • 谌鄂湘 08-06

       The Gossip inwardly smiling at her idle speeches, which(nevertheles) she avouched with very vehement asseverations: fellinstantly sicke of womens naturall disease, thinking every minute atedious month, till she were in company with some other Gossips, tobreake the obligation of her vertuous promise, and that others (aswell as her selfe) might laugh at the folly of this shallow-wittedwoman. The next day following, it was her hap to be at a wedding,among a great number of other women, whom quickly she acquaintedwith this so strange a wonder; as they did the like to their husbands:and passing so from hand to hand, in lesse space then two dayes, allVenice was fully possessed with it. Among the rest, the brethren tothis foolish woman, heard this admirable newes concerning theirSister; and they discreetly concealing it to themselves, closelyconcluded to watch the walks of this pretended God: and if he soarednot too lofty a flight, they would clip his wings, to come thebetter acquainted with him. It fortuned, that the Friar hearing hisCupidicall visitations over-publikely discovered, purposed to checkand reprove Lisetta for her indiscretion. And being habitedaccording to his former manner, his Friarly Cowle covering all hisformer bravery, he left his companion where he used to stay, andclosely walked along unto the house. No sooner was he entred, butthe Brethren being ambushed neere to the doore, went in after him, andascending the staires, by such time as he had uncased himselfe, andappeared like God Cupid, with his spangled wings displayed: theyrushed into the Chamber, and he having no other refuge, opened a largeCasement, standing directly over the great gulfe or River, andpresently leapt into the water; which being deepe, and he skilfullin swimming, he had no other harme by his fall, albeit the sodaineaffright did much perplex him.

  • 拉得 08-04

    {  Now, it evidently appeareth, that Spinelloccio well deserved whatwas done to him, and I purpose to speake of another, who needs wouldseeke after his owne disgrace.

  • 宋馨跟 08-04

      OF SOME BLAME OR SCANDALL, ESCAPING WITHOUT SIGHT, KNOWLEDGE,

提交评论